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Question about combining Hi8 and VHS-C to DVD-R

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  • Tuner Cards
  • Video
  • DVD Writers
  • Graphics
Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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Anonymous
December 24, 2004 1:44:07 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Hello all...
I have about 75 mixed tapes in Hi8 and VHS-C formats. Because of the
content and dates of these tapes, I will need to combine both formats
onto DVD-R Discs. Capturing the video into the PC is no problem as it
is set to DV" (capture at full DV quality through ADVC-100) and does so
quite nicely. My question is this:
Because of the formats I am using (Hi8, VHS-C) and Assuming that the
Hi8 tapes are going to be the best quality scenes,(requiring the
highest lines of resolution) how much video time should I expect to get
on a DVD-R and at what rate (KB/S) should I record back to DVD after my
authoring is finished?

TIA

Joeman

More about : question combining hi8 vhs dvd

Anonymous
December 24, 2004 4:19:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Hey Dave,

I would prefer to get 2 hours but could probably live with an hour and
a half on each DVD. Is there really a big difference between an hours
worth and 2 hours on a DVD?
What do you lose when going down from 8000 to 6000 to 4500 etc, etc..
Is it overall quality of video?, or is it things like color,
brightness, and texture/pixelation that is affected?
Thanks again,

Joeman
Anonymous
December 24, 2004 9:23:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Jman wrote:
> Hey Dave,
>
> I would prefer to get 2 hours but could probably live with an hour and
> a half on each DVD. Is there really a big difference between an hours
> worth and 2 hours on a DVD?
> What do you lose when going down from 8000 to 6000 to 4500 etc, etc..
> Is it overall quality of video?, or is it things like color,
> brightness, and texture/pixelation that is affected?
> Thanks again,
>
> Joeman


All of the above will be affected. Think of the quality difference
recording a program on VHS tape at the 2 hr. speed vs. the 6 hr. speed and
you'll get a rough idea.

Mike
Anonymous
December 25, 2004 11:57:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"Jman" <mooglieman@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1103913847.461536.28230@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> Hello all...
> I have about 75 mixed tapes in Hi8 and VHS-C formats. Because of the
> content and dates of these tapes, I will need to combine both formats
> onto DVD-R Discs. Capturing the video into the PC is no problem as it
> is set to DV" (capture at full DV quality through ADVC-100) and does so
> quite nicely. My question is this:
> Because of the formats I am using (Hi8, VHS-C) and Assuming that the
> Hi8 tapes are going to be the best quality scenes,(requiring the
> highest lines of resolution) how much video time should I expect to get
> on a DVD-R and at what rate (KB/S) should I record back to DVD after my
> authoring is finished?
>
> TIA
>
> Joeman
>

When you capture these various formats into the PC in full DV quality using
the ADVC-100 each and every clip, regardless of the original format, have
the same frame resolution, color depth, and data rate. Origin of format has
nothing to do with eventual output/encoding. There is no particular formula
for quality versus bit rate on DVD that can be given. The overall quality of
the DVD will depend on several factors.

If your video is mostly scenes of family sitting around having conversations
and dinners, etc. then a low bit rate of CBR 4 could be chosen to give more
time per disc. If there are a lot of faster action scenes like family
football games, sack races, or tennis where there is more camera/subject
movement then a higher bit rate of 6 CBR would probably work better. In this
respect I would not attempt to cram much more than 1 hour and a half to
maybe 1 hour 45 minutes. Remember, menus take disc space as well. The more
menus and the more complex the menus the more disc space. Even adding
chapter points add to disc space even though that pointer file is rather
small. Also, the bit rate chosen for the video may be CBR 6 but the audio
adds to it yielding something closer to 7. Don't assume the video is the
only consideration for building the overall DVD.

Having an encoder which will do multi-pass VBR would help tremendously. As I
said before, there is no true formula for someone to hand you, and
experimentation will be the best way to find out how and when to use various
bit rate choices. Overall I use a bit rate of 6 CBR and the video looks
fine. But, I am also satisfied with placing about an hour and a half on a
disc. They are cheap enough, why not?
--
Larry Johnson
Digital Video Solutions
webmaster@digitalvideosolutions.com
http://www.digitalvideosolutions.com
877-227-6281 Toll Free Sales Assistance
386-672-1941 Customer Service
386-672-1907 Technical Support
386-676-1515 Fax
Anonymous
December 28, 2004 3:31:18 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Hey Thanks Larry,

Makes sense to me..... Gonna give it a try in the new year and
experiment with
several of your suggestions and see how these movies turn out !!
Joeman.....
!