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Best codec for encoding video for archive purposes.

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Anonymous
January 4, 2005 1:24:10 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Hi all!

I am looking for advice on which codec to use to archive video footage
captured from analogue VHS for the purpose of buring to a DVD-R and
editing at a later date.

I will be using roughtly 45 minutes of tape per DVD-R so any bitate
advice you can give too would be appreciated.

Thansk,

Engelkott
Anonymous
January 4, 2005 9:03:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

If it fits (eg. dual layer disc), then DV codec AVI files are the best.

Otherwise, you'll have to use something else with higher compression:
PicVideo MJPEG (adjustable compression), HuffYUV, DIVX/XVID/MPEG-4, MPEG-2.

Out of these, MPEG-2 is a pretty easy pick for easy of encoding and
decoding - just about everything works with this nowadays. After that,
MJPEG because it's fast, easily adjustable, and a quick&easy one to try
before the others. After that, DIVX/XVID/etc. with a lot of adjusting
and testing; same with Huffyuv - these can get very high quality
multi-pass encodings, but can take forever to encode and to tweak.
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 5:55:20 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

On Tue, 04 Jan 2005 18:03:13 -0800, David Chien <chiendh@uci.edu>
wrote:

>If it fits (eg. dual layer disc), then DV codec AVI files are the best.
>
>Otherwise, you'll have to use something else with higher compression:
>PicVideo MJPEG (adjustable compression), HuffYUV, DIVX/XVID/MPEG-4, MPEG-2.
>
>Out of these, MPEG-2 is a pretty easy pick for easy of encoding and
>decoding - just about everything works with this nowadays. After that,
>MJPEG because it's fast, easily adjustable, and a quick&easy one to try
>before the others. After that, DIVX/XVID/etc. with a lot of adjusting
>and testing; same with Huffyuv - these can get very high quality
>multi-pass encodings, but can take forever to encode and to tweak.

For the amount of footage he wants on each DVD-R and the fact
he wants to edit it later, I'd say MJPEG at a low compression setting
would be his best bet. MPEG-2 wouldn't be a good choice, because of
the later editing requirement.

-----------------------------------------------------
Neil Nadelman arvy@navzr-genafyngbe.pbz (ROT13)
-----------------------------------------------------
I have no fears in life,
for I have already survived Theta-G!
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Anonymous
January 5, 2005 5:55:21 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

It all comes down to the tradeoff of space/quality.
If you want to edit later, highly-compressed codecs
like MPEG2 may not be what you should be looking at.
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 7:11:17 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

With a single sided disk, you can get about 22mins of DV AVI on a
single disk, so if you don't object to splitting your 45 min tapes
across 2 discs, this may be an option for you. It will certainly
result in the best quality and ease of editing later on, with the
downside obviously being the cost. If you don't have too many tapes,
perhaps this is the way to go. (I'm assuming here that you're
capturing as DV... you don't actually state that)
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 12:09:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Engelkott wrote:
> On 5 Jan 2005 04:11:17 -0800, "stankley" <pstankley@hotmail.com>
> wrote:
>
> >With a single sided disk, you can get about 22mins of DV AVI on a
> >single disk, so if you don't object to splitting your 45 min tapes
> >across 2 discs, this may be an option for you. It will certainly
> >result in the best quality and ease of editing later on, with the
> >downside obviously being the cost. If you don't have too many
tapes,
> >perhaps this is the way to go. (I'm assuming here that you're
> >capturing as DV... you don't actually state that)
>
> Hi!
>
> Thansk for your reply! I did mention that i was capturing from
> analogue VHS tape in my original post witht he end product being on
> dvd for storage.
>
> You reply has been very helpful and much appreciated!
>
> Thanks!
>
> Engelkott

Right, but you haven't told us in what form you're capturing the VHS
source. If thru a digital camcorder, then it will be DV (13Gb/hour).
If you're using a capture card, then it could be MPEG2, MJPEG or other
forms, each of which has its own data rate.
Ultimately, of course, you have to convert to MPEG2 to burn to DVD.
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 6:29:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

On Wed, 05 Jan 2005 02:55:20 -0500, Neil Nadelman
<arvy@navzr-genafyngbe.pbz (ROT13)> wrote:

>On Tue, 04 Jan 2005 18:03:13 -0800, David Chien <chiendh@uci.edu>
>wrote:
>
>>If it fits (eg. dual layer disc), then DV codec AVI files are the best.
>>
>>Otherwise, you'll have to use something else with higher compression:
>>PicVideo MJPEG (adjustable compression), HuffYUV, DIVX/XVID/MPEG-4, MPEG-2.
>>
>>Out of these, MPEG-2 is a pretty easy pick for easy of encoding and
>>decoding - just about everything works with this nowadays. After that,
>>MJPEG because it's fast, easily adjustable, and a quick&easy one to try
>>before the others. After that, DIVX/XVID/etc. with a lot of adjusting
>>and testing; same with Huffyuv - these can get very high quality
>>multi-pass encodings, but can take forever to encode and to tweak.
>
> For the amount of footage he wants on each DVD-R and the fact
>he wants to edit it later, I'd say MJPEG at a low compression setting
>would be his best bet. MPEG-2 wouldn't be a good choice, because of
>the later editing requirement.
>
>-----------------------------------------------------
>Neil Nadelman arvy@navzr-genafyngbe.pbz (ROT13)
>-----------------------------------------------------
> I have no fears in life,
> for I have already survived Theta-G!

Thanks for your reply! I think i will go the MJPEG route. I seem to
remember buying the Morgan codec about 2 years ago, i just have to
find it! :) 

Thanks again!

Engelkott
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 6:29:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

On 5 Jan 2005 04:11:17 -0800, "stankley" <pstankley@hotmail.com>
wrote:

>With a single sided disk, you can get about 22mins of DV AVI on a
>single disk, so if you don't object to splitting your 45 min tapes
>across 2 discs, this may be an option for you. It will certainly
>result in the best quality and ease of editing later on, with the
>downside obviously being the cost. If you don't have too many tapes,
>perhaps this is the way to go. (I'm assuming here that you're
>capturing as DV... you don't actually state that)

Hi!

Thansk for your reply! I did mention that i was capturing from
analogue VHS tape in my original post witht he end product being on
dvd for storage.

You reply has been very helpful and much appreciated!

Thanks!

Engelkott
!