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Desaturating Digital Video

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Anonymous
January 5, 2005 6:46:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

To save memory space while using an editor program, is it possible to
desaturate or reduce video to a filter/sketch format?

Many image processing applications allow this for individual pictures,
but it may be helpful to have something like this for bulk video
treatment.

Thanks.
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 1:33:54 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

doctor_meticulous wrote ...
> To save memory space while using an editor program, is it
> possible to desaturate or reduce video to a filter/sketch format?

Desaturating (or even full conversion to black&white) won't
save you any space unless you want to invent your own custom
codec.

> Many image processing applications allow this for individual
> pictures, but it may be helpful to have something like this for
> bulk video treatment.

The traditional way of editing with smaller files is to use lower-
resolution and sometimes even lower-speed (15FPS, etc.)

Of course, you need to have some system of capturing the EDL
(edit decision list) and then going back and doing "online edit"
with the REAL video and the EDL. With the progress in computers
and hard drives, this offline/online method is disappearing into
the dust.
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 4:32:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Thank you for answering.

I've never used an editing program, so I was curious about memory size
and management. How much raw footage can a desktop pc manage now?

I was thinking in terms of having the digital edit as only a guideline
for the actual cutting and splicing of film stock.


kk
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Anonymous
January 6, 2005 9:18:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

doctor_meticulous wrote ...
> I've never used an editing program, so I was curious about
> memory size and management. How much raw footage can
> a desktop pc manage now?

Scores to hundreds of hours with newer large disk drives and
drive arrays. (Limited by hard drive space, not by RAM or
CPU)

> I was thinking in terms of having the digital edit as only
> a guideline for the actual cutting and splicing of film stock.

There is a thriving segment of NLE devoted to offline film
editing. Most of the edit applications above the bottom-rung
likely support 24FPS, etc. to keep conforming and negative
cutting simple.
January 7, 2005 11:08:14 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

doctor_meticulous@yahoo.com wrote:

>To save memory space while using an editor program, is it possible to
>desaturate or reduce video to a filter/sketch format?
>
>Many image processing applications allow this for individual pictures,
>but it may be helpful to have something like this for bulk video
>treatment.
>
>Thanks.

The Pinnacle Studio line of editing do this now. Studio always uses a
low-resolution rendering of the video for editing. You have two
options for capturing if you are using a DV cam as your source.

1: capture full quality, edit with Studio's normal reduced
resolution stream, then render or play back to a vcr at the original
high-quality.
2: capture at reduced quality (using much less disc space), edit
the low-quality stream, then when you get ready to render or play the
final version, Studio will re-capture at high quality, adding all your
editing.

However, with computers now being so powerful and hard-drive space
being so cheap, it really doesn't make sense to deal with anything
except full quality, full tape captures.

At one time it was necessary to use edit lists and only capture the
tiny bits one needed to edit a project, but I haven't used a batch
capture or reduced-quality capture in years.

Hope this helps.

Susan
Anonymous
January 7, 2005 4:09:49 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

When it comes down to lines of resolution, film still holds the record
at around 4000 lines per frame. If one sticks with the output of even
the best digital cameras, quality of the image suffers.
!