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Seeking no-brainer, easiest to use DVD Authoring Program

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Anonymous
January 6, 2005 8:12:58 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

My company has been approached by a potential client who wants us to
create a kiosk type of device (to use at conventions, etc.) where a
user can choose their favorite sports moment, re-record their own
voiceover for it (emulating the sports announcer), and then have the
machine spit out a custom DVD that contains the sports moment with
their voiceover on it.

Although there are many additional details related to the project that
I don't feel are necessary to explain, .. what I am inquiring about is
if someone here might know of a DVD authoring application that's easy
enough for a non-technical person to use without too much mental
exertion. The kiosk booth will be manned by an "engineer" of sorts,
but this engineer is apparently going to be a mere non-paid intern with
no technical knowlege as it relates to DVD authoring. So I need to find
a program that has a very easy to use wizard-based type of approach and
that will be easy to demonstrate how to use. Ideally, The program will
need to have the following features:

1) Must be for the PC platform and relatively stable
2) The ability to have animated menus (video clip as the menu
background)
3) Built in graphic / button creation tools
4) The capability to burn and verify the DVD directly through the
program
5) The resulting discs must be compatible with a standard set-top DVD
player

If anyone knows of a program they could reccommend that has all of
these features, and that they think would be well suited for the
project I've described, please let me know. Any advice would be
greatly appreciated.

Thanks!
- yvan
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 10:38:11 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

<yvan@ideasdesign.com> wrote ...
> My company has been approached by a potential client who wants us to
> create a kiosk type of device (to use at conventions, etc.) where a
> user can choose their favorite sports moment, re-record their own
> voiceover for it (emulating the sports announcer), and then have the
> machine spit out a custom DVD that contains the sports moment with
> their voiceover on it.

You may be in over your head. I would investigate sub-contracting
to someone who specializes in kiosk/custom software development.
I don't think that ANY of the commercially available DVD authoring
software is suitable for reliable full-automatic kiosk use.

I'd guess that the most reliable and lowest-cost development would be
a full-custom application written for Linux to take advantage of the
open-source modules available for the various functions.
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 10:52:52 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

>> Although there are many additional details related to the project
that
>> I don't feel are necessary to explain, ..

I'm not sure what got lost in the translation here. Would someone be
so kind as to answer my question, rather than nit pick my intentionally
vaguely described project? And once again, Linux is not an option.

Easy to use wizard-based DVD Authoring software. PC platform. I'll
handle the remaining details, thank you :) 

- yvan
Related resources
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 11:31:10 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

<yvan@ideasdesign.com> wrote in message
news:1105017178.522979.15410@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> My company has been approached by a potential client who wants us to
> create a kiosk type of device (to use at conventions, etc.) where a
> user can choose their favorite sports moment, re-record their own
> voiceover for it (emulating the sports announcer), and then have the
> machine spit out a custom DVD that contains the sports moment with
> their voiceover on it.
>
> Although there are many additional details related to the project that
> I don't feel are necessary to explain, .. what I am inquiring about is
> if someone here might know of a DVD authoring application that's easy
> enough for a non-technical person to use without too much mental
> exertion. The kiosk booth will be manned by an "engineer" of sorts,
> but this engineer is apparently going to be a mere non-paid intern with
> no technical knowlege as it relates to DVD authoring. So I need to find
> a program that has a very easy to use wizard-based type of approach and
> that will be easy to demonstrate how to use. Ideally, The program will
> need to have the following features:
>
> 1) Must be for the PC platform and relatively stable
> 2) The ability to have animated menus (video clip as the menu
> background)
> 3) Built in graphic / button creation tools
> 4) The capability to burn and verify the DVD directly through the
> program
> 5) The resulting discs must be compatible with a standard set-top DVD
> player
>
> If anyone knows of a program they could reccommend that has all of
> these features, and that they think would be well suited for the
> project I've described, please let me know. Any advice would be
> greatly appreciated.
>
> Thanks!
> - yvan
>

I guess I should look on it as, "Oh how far we've come!"

The first thought I had was "Why a DVD and not a VCD? Will this
be a multi-hour "Sports Moment"? How long would this "user" be
allowed to try to make his "Howard Cosell" moment? If he were
trying to do even a two minute spot, it could take a lot more time
than a "Kiosk type of device" should allow. I doubt you would
want your "user" to spend the time it would take to do a 5 or 10
minute spot, much less a DVD's worth.

Who would need to be able to use the capabilities of # 2 & 3
above? The "mere non-paid intern with no technical knowledge as it
relates to DVD authoring" or your "user"? You would be better off
having a number of pre-made menus for the "user" to select from and
then personalize. Remember though: the more choice for your "user",
the longer the process will take.

Luck;
Ken
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 2:51:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Thank you Larry. I never meant to come across seeming rude in one of
my earlier responses. I just didn't feel it was necessary to explain
every detail of how I'd planned to approach this project, in the
interest of getting an answer to the one outstanding question that I
had.

To clarify, . .the term "kiosk" might have been somewhat misleading, as
this will not be a box that is intended to have all aspects of the dvd
production being automated (even though that's be ideal). It will be
manned by an individual, who will control the scene selection /
previewing, the audio recording sessions, and the DVD production.

Also, all potential copyright considerations have been thoroughly
researched and relayed to the client, .. and they have already taken
the necessary steps to secure the content (they are a high-profile
sports radio station with all the right connections.)

Sports moments will be no more 2 mins in length, and when recording the
voicever, we intend to play appropriately selected background crowd
noises to retain the needed sense of ambience.

2 PCS will be used: One to serve as the user interface for selecting
and previewing the video clips, and for recording voiceovers, .. and
the 2nd PC for the dvd authoring and burning. Both will be networked
together, so that recorded WAV files can be quickly and easily
transferred from one machine to the other.

When previewing the sports moments, windows media files will be used.
When recording audio voicevers, DV format video clips will be used
which have the audio tracks replaced with crowd noises. When building
the DVD, .. pre-created project files will be readily on hand, .. each
of which will contain the specific already-endcoded MPEG2 files (video
only), as well as the pre-created animated menu background.

I am certainly fully capable of taking on the project, though I would
not be the least bit reluctant to outsource it if was able to find the
right candidate for it. By the way "Nap" (not sure what you're name
is) -- you can email me at ideasdesignINC (dot com) - just add the inc
to the previous address you tried to email me at.

One again, -- thank you for your thoughtful and informative response :) 
Cheers,
- yvan
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 3:17:15 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

yvan@ideasdesign.com wrote:
> Thank you Larry. I never meant to come across seeming rude in one of
> my earlier responses. I just didn't feel it was necessary to explain
> every detail of how I'd planned to approach this project, in the
> interest of getting an answer to the one outstanding question that I
> had.
>
> To clarify, . .the term "kiosk" might have been somewhat misleading,
as
> this will not be a box that is intended to have all aspects of the
dvd
> production being automated (even though that's be ideal). It will be
> manned by an individual, who will control the scene selection /
> previewing, the audio recording sessions, and the DVD production.
>
> Also, all potential copyright considerations have been thoroughly
> researched and relayed to the client, .. and they have already taken
> the necessary steps to secure the content (they are a high-profile
> sports radio station with all the right connections.)
>
> Sports moments will be no more 2 mins in length, and when recording
the
> voicever, we intend to play appropriately selected background crowd
> noises to retain the needed sense of ambience.
>
> 2 PCS will be used: One to serve as the user interface for selecting
> and previewing the video clips, and for recording voiceovers, .. and
> the 2nd PC for the dvd authoring and burning. Both will be networked
> together, so that recorded WAV files can be quickly and easily
> transferred from one machine to the other.
>
> When previewing the sports moments, windows media files will be used.
> When recording audio voicevers, DV format video clips will be used
> which have the audio tracks replaced with crowd noises. When
building
> the DVD, .. pre-created project files will be readily on hand, ..
each
> of which will contain the specific already-endcoded MPEG2 files
(video
> only), as well as the pre-created animated menu background.
>
> I am certainly fully capable of taking on the project, though I would
> not be the least bit reluctant to outsource it if was able to find
the
> right candidate for it. By the way "Nap" (not sure what you're name
> is) -- you can email me at ideasdesignINC (dot com) - just add the
inc
> to the previous address you tried to email me at.
>
> One again, -- thank you for your thoughtful and informative response
:) 
> Cheers,
> - yvan

Ok, without making any suggestions on methodology, copyright
infringements etc
any of the brand name products will do more or less what you want.

Look at Ulead, Pinnacle, Adobe, Sony (multimedia.sony.com). You should
be able to download a demo of each. There is also shareware software
around.

There is a little learning to be done but from your description you
will simply be reburning the same project after having replaced the
voice track.

As to playing a disk back in any DVD player - NO - I have not found any
burning software the will guarentee a DVD or video CD will play in ANY
player.

Good luck with your endevour.
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 3:21:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

<yvan@ideasdesign.com> wrote in message
news:1105026772.392337.33670@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
>>> Although there are many additional details related to the project
> that
>>> I don't feel are necessary to explain, ..
>
> I'm not sure what got lost in the translation here. Would someone be
> so kind as to answer my question, rather than nit pick my intentionally
> vaguely described project? And once again, Linux is not an option.
>
> Easy to use wizard-based DVD Authoring software. PC platform. I'll
> handle the remaining details, thank you :) 
>
> - yvan
>

Gee, with an attitude like that, I'll just rush out and research the
field for the perfect software for you. Don't worry, just sit back
and wait.

Luck;
Ken
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 3:56:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

yvan wrote:

> To clarify, . .the term "kiosk" might have been somewhat misleading,
as
> this will not be a box that is intended to have all aspects of the
dvd
> production being automated (even though that's be ideal). It will be
> manned by an individual, who will control the scene selection /
> previewing, the audio recording sessions, and the DVD production.

That is a very different environment than the traditional
definition of a "kiosk" where the end-user drives (like an
ATM machine, for example)

If you have a human operator (who can have some minimal
training, presumably), then indeed a simple commercial
product running on a standard platform (MSwin or Mac,
etc.) sounds like the logical choice.

I have had success only with ~high-end Adobe Encore,
so I'll leave it to others to suggest reliable simple
and/or inexpensive DVD authoring application suggestions.
I'd kinda be interested in that myself.
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 9:00:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

I can develop this for you. But your mail got bounced back.


<yvan@ideasdesign.com> wrote in message
news:1105017178.522979.15410@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> My company has been approached by a potential client who wants us to
> create a kiosk type of device (to use at conventions, etc.) where a
> user can choose their favorite sports moment, re-record their own
> voiceover for it (emulating the sports announcer), and then have the
> machine spit out a custom DVD that contains the sports moment with
> their voiceover on it.
>
> Although there are many additional details related to the project that
> I don't feel are necessary to explain, .. what I am inquiring about is
> if someone here might know of a DVD authoring application that's easy
> enough for a non-technical person to use without too much mental
> exertion. The kiosk booth will be manned by an "engineer" of sorts,
> but this engineer is apparently going to be a mere non-paid intern with
> no technical knowlege as it relates to DVD authoring. So I need to find
> a program that has a very easy to use wizard-based type of approach and
> that will be easy to demonstrate how to use. Ideally, The program will
> need to have the following features:
>
> 1) Must be for the PC platform and relatively stable
> 2) The ability to have animated menus (video clip as the menu
> background)
> 3) Built in graphic / button creation tools
> 4) The capability to burn and verify the DVD directly through the
> program
> 5) The resulting discs must be compatible with a standard set-top DVD
> player
>
> If anyone knows of a program they could reccommend that has all of
> these features, and that they think would be well suited for the
> project I've described, please let me know. Any advice would be
> greatly appreciated.
>
> Thanks!
> - yvan
>
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 9:42:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

<yvan@ideasdesign.com> wrote in message
news:1105017178.522979.15410@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> My company has been approached by a potential client who wants us to
> create a kiosk type of device (to use at conventions, etc.) where a
> user can choose their favorite sports moment, re-record their own
> voiceover for it (emulating the sports announcer), and then have the
> machine spit out a custom DVD that contains the sports moment with
> their voiceover on it.
>
> Although there are many additional details related to the project that
> I don't feel are necessary to explain, .. what I am inquiring about is
> if someone here might know of a DVD authoring application that's easy
> enough for a non-technical person to use without too much mental
> exertion. The kiosk booth will be manned by an "engineer" of sorts,
> but this engineer is apparently going to be a mere non-paid intern with
> no technical knowlege as it relates to DVD authoring. So I need to find
> a program that has a very easy to use wizard-based type of approach and
> that will be easy to demonstrate how to use. Ideally, The program will
> need to have the following features:
>
> 1) Must be for the PC platform and relatively stable
> 2) The ability to have animated menus (video clip as the menu
> background)
> 3) Built in graphic / button creation tools
> 4) The capability to burn and verify the DVD directly through the
> program
> 5) The resulting discs must be compatible with a standard set-top DVD
> player
>
> If anyone knows of a program they could reccommend that has all of
> these features, and that they think would be well suited for the
> project I've described, please let me know. Any advice would be
> greatly appreciated.
>
> Thanks!
> - yvan
>

It sounds like you want a program such as Ulead DVD MovieFactory - cost is
low and it leads the user through the steps of creating a DVD or video CD.
It's pretty much a no-brainer. Aside from that there are some considerations
you mentioned, but have misconceptions about.

The first is the idea of this "favorite sports moment". Video footage from
any sport which was derived by taping televised professional football,
baseball, basketball, hockey, etc. are covered by copyright laws. The
company planning this "kiosk" operation may run into some legal troubles if
these discs are sold, even as a novelty item.

The second is that these video segments are going to be pretty stark
considering you will have to do away with the original anouncer which will
also take away the crowd cheers and background noises.

The third thing is you will need to have these segments pre-transcoded for
faster write to disc operations, and also have the raw footage for doing the
voice overs. Which will entail the "user" navigating around the system to
add elements together on these discs. I don't think even MovieFactory allows
voice over on the MPEG-2 files during playback. I could be wrong.

The fourth thing is the motion menu segments should be prepared ahead of
time for faster write to disc operations. If any part of this process is raw
video data the transcode times even for very good encoders on very fast
computers can be at least 2 or 3 to 1 in time, if not greater.

The fifth thiing is what about the label for these discs? Is it going to
match the particular video segment chosen by the user, or will it be a
"one-size-fits-all" label? Also, what about the container for the disc? Now
you're getting into the area of asking the question of just how many of
these things do you want to give away? Because you are certainly headed for
trouble if you are selling them at these conventions. Professional sports
team logos are trademarked and copyrighted as well, and the industry WILL
investigate even the smallest infraction.

I once owned a sign business and upon the request of a company created a
sign for their nightclub with lettering just like the "Toys R Us" lettering
with the color scheme in the exact same colors. The bar was in the little
mid-western town of Bloomington, Indiana USA and you would think that this
would have been far enough from the sight of the "Toys R Us" company as to
not attract attention. That sign was ordered by "Toys R Us" to taken down
only 3 weeks after it was placed on the building!! Their lawyers threatened
to level a very large lawsuit against both our company's - my sign business
and the nightclub!!! The backward R and the color scheme are both
copyrighted and trademarked. Don't be fooled into thinking no one is looking
at what you are doing.

The last thing is the fact that you want the final disc to be compatible
with standard set-top DVD players. The only way to ensure even near total
compatibility with all the varying players out there is to have them stamped
at a professional production house. No matter what you do there are going to
be players that will reject your discs, especially if you just go out and
buy the very cheapest one's on the shelf at the local outlet. Compatibility
with set-top players has more to do with the brand of the disc than with the
player when it comes to some of the older players out there. New players
will play just about anything you throw at them. It is still better to get
the best brand discs like Maxell for the widest compatibility. Again how
much of this stuff do you want to give away?

I'm not trying to put your idea down. In the right scenerio it may work,
like if you were affiliated with the Miami Dolphins and they were doing this
to raise money for the Tsunami victims. If you aren't affiliated with
professional sports in any way then I wouldn't risk it. I live in Daytona
Beach and even though I have amateur footage of the Daytona 500 I cannot
include any of this footage in video advertising for my company without
completely blurring out any readable logos, etc from the cars on the track
because it is an infringement on NASCAR, which is just down the street.

Do you have the time and the know-how to do blur tracking in all this
footage you plan to use, and will doing that spoil the whole appeal for the
guy who is doing the voice over? I think you don't have the expetise to do
all that. And I don't think the potential customer will want it if it is
done.

--
Larry Johnson
Digital Video Solutions
webmaster@digitalvideosolutions.com
http://www.digitalvideosolutions.com
877-227-6281 Toll Free Sales Assistance
386-672-1941 Customer Service
386-672-1907 Technical Support
386-676-1515 Fax
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 11:48:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

On a sunny day (Thu, 6 Jan 2005 07:38:11 -0800) it happened "Richard Crowley"
<rcrowley7@xprt.net> wrote in <10tqmr4k28h9425@corp.supernews.com>:

><yvan@ideasdesign.com> wrote ...
>> My company has been approached by a potential client who wants us to
>> create a kiosk type of device (to use at conventions, etc.) where a
>> user can choose their favorite sports moment, re-record their own
>> voiceover for it (emulating the sports announcer), and then have the
>> machine spit out a custom DVD that contains the sports moment with
>> their voiceover on it.
>
>You may be in over your head. I would investigate sub-contracting
>to someone who specializes in kiosk/custom software development.
>I don't think that ANY of the commercially available DVD authoring
>software is suitable for reliable full-automatic kiosk use.
>
>I'd guess that the most reliable and lowest-cost development would be
>a full-custom application written for Linux to take advantage of the
>open-source modules available for the various functions.
Agreed, I can do that in Linux, even add a some nice buttons, display
on a normal TV (no PC in sight, just a TV with a microphone and buttons).
User will still have to wait for processing time and burning...
I am not volunteering, probably at other end of the world...

PC, video out, mplayer or xine, dvdwizard, rec, interface via serial port,
some PIC micro to accept buttons, or even via par port....
Select a scene (button), press start (button), speak in mike (uses 'rec'),
Confirm or cancel (buttons) so someone can try again, mp2enc, multimux,
ffmpeg, tcmplex-panteltje, dvdwizard, dvdauthor, mkisofs, dvdimagecmp,
and eject to lauch the ready DVD towards the user ;-)

Add a webcam and make a selectable menu button where user can see himself
later on DVD, proably plenty of space anyways.
Sourcefiles in mpeg2 can fit on a normal harddisk, no mpeg2 recode
needed.
Any takers?
hehe
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 11:49:02 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

On a sunny day (6 Jan 2005 07:52:52 -0800) it happened yvan@ideasdesign.com
wrote in <1105026772.392337.33670@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>:

>>> Although there are many additional details related to the project
>that
>>> I don't feel are necessary to explain, ..
>
>I'm not sure what got lost in the translation here. Would someone be
>so kind as to answer my question, rather than nit pick my intentionally
>vaguely described project? And once again, Linux is not an option.
>
>Easy to use wizard-based DVD Authoring software. PC platform. I'll
>handle the remaining details, thank you :) 
>
If you say 'linux' is not an option you very likely will not be able to
handle the remaining details.
If you are the Yvan I know, then I am sooo right.
Anonymous
January 7, 2005 1:23:35 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

(Steve mumbled to himself)
Why oh why can't DVD Studio Pro be that easy?
hehe

On 1/6/05 3:48 PM, in article
1105044541.aa36f2c70bcbe70db933e64ebd907dbb@teranews, "Jan Panteltje"
<pNaonStpealmtje@yahoo.com> wrote:

> On a sunny day (Thu, 6 Jan 2005 07:38:11 -0800) it happened "Richard Crowley"
> <rcrowley7@xprt.net> wrote in <10tqmr4k28h9425@corp.supernews.com>:
>
>> <yvan@ideasdesign.com> wrote ...
>>> My company has been approached by a potential client who wants us to
>>> create a kiosk type of device (to use at conventions, etc.) where a
>>> user can choose their favorite sports moment, re-record their own
>>> voiceover for it (emulating the sports announcer), and then have the
>>> machine spit out a custom DVD that contains the sports moment with
>>> their voiceover on it.
>>
>> You may be in over your head. I would investigate sub-contracting
>> to someone who specializes in kiosk/custom software development.
>> I don't think that ANY of the commercially available DVD authoring
>> software is suitable for reliable full-automatic kiosk use.
>>
>> I'd guess that the most reliable and lowest-cost development would be
>> a full-custom application written for Linux to take advantage of the
>> open-source modules available for the various functions.
> Agreed, I can do that in Linux, even add a some nice buttons, display
> on a normal TV (no PC in sight, just a TV with a microphone and buttons).
> User will still have to wait for processing time and burning...
> I am not volunteering, probably at other end of the world...
>
> PC, video out, mplayer or xine, dvdwizard, rec, interface via serial port,
> some PIC micro to accept buttons, or even via par port....
> Select a scene (button), press start (button), speak in mike (uses 'rec'),
> Confirm or cancel (buttons) so someone can try again, mp2enc, multimux,
> ffmpeg, tcmplex-panteltje, dvdwizard, dvdauthor, mkisofs, dvdimagecmp,
> and eject to lauch the ready DVD towards the user ;-)
>
> Add a webcam and make a selectable menu button where user can see himself
> later on DVD, proably plenty of space anyways.
> Sourcefiles in mpeg2 can fit on a normal harddisk, no mpeg2 recode
> needed.
> Any takers?
> hehe
>
>
Anonymous
January 7, 2005 8:22:25 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

To answer your original question, personally I would steer clear of
Pinnacle Studio [versions 7-9].

Having recently built a brand new system, I have had nothing but
trouble with Pinnacle Studio 8. Yes, it is very easy to use and has a
nice user interface. However, it currently intermittently burns DVD's,
has invoked the DEP protection thru Windows XP for some unknown reason,
and sporadically seems to stop the computer from going into Hibernate
mode.

>From what I've read on the Internet, this is not an isolated case
either. Unfortunately, I cannot offer a solution as to an easier
program although I will be upgrading to Adobe Premiere [quite costly
though].

Hope this helps

Neo
Anonymous
January 7, 2005 1:48:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

>> So, from this, if somebody says 'Linux is not an option' that shows
he
cannot play.

I say Linux is not an option because I have no patience for dealing
with this level of arrogance, which I encounter time and time again
whenever I have to deal with diehard Linux advocates. You expelled
quite the mouthful to insult me, you know. And really, all you did was
reinforce my stance on all of this.

I know how to use Linux, and have tinkered with many different
distributions. But in my experience, it is NOT an OS best suited for
multimedia applications. I've tried Kino, and Cinelerra, and MainActor,
... and all those other apps, and quite frankly,.. they just don't
measure up to their equivalents on the Windows platform. Period. If
you insist on turning this into another boring linux vs. windows
thread, then by all means feel free. I can see where this discussion is
headed, and it sure as hell doesn't have anything to do with my
original question. WTF dude?
Anonymous
January 7, 2005 2:21:46 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,1759,1309123,00.asp

None are super easy to the point where they're brain-dead easy, but
Sonic MyDVD is one of the easiest ones available.

Figure as long as you've got someone there trained to go through the
wizards, they should be able to output DVDs okay. It's a pretty easy
program to use for anyone out there, so I can't imagine having too many
problems with this (or iDVD, the only other one I'd recommend).

Anyways, with 10 year olds making DVDs from both of these programs, it
can't be too hard, eh?
Anonymous
January 7, 2005 2:46:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

If I understand the project you will have predefined video clips,
a customer will record a commentary while watching the video clip.

You then burn the video clip and commentary to a DVD.

You dont really need a video editor, you need a player.

The audio clip needs to be converted and placed in a premade file set
for burning to DVD.

If you don't want to learn how to do all of this you should be able to
get it set up in a couple of hours using a contractor.

Vegas movie studio 4 with the DVD authoring software should do
everything you need, as would most of the editors on the market.

If you train the operator a little he should be able to adjust the
audio a little if required.

A true Kiosk style - unattended and customer operated is a whole
different project.

If you wanted a number of customers at the same time a network of Unix
boxes might be cheaper.
Only the base station would need to burn DVD or cd.
Anonymous
January 7, 2005 2:59:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

See what I mean guys? This guy only deals with "experts".

And he's right, you know. I am not good enough with Linux. But say I
was good enough to build a custom application and GUI under Linux.
Would that, then, mean that I'm an expert too?? Jeez, if only I'd
known that only Linux users can be experts. I wouldn't have wasted all
that time and money on earning expensive college degrees. Damn...

So I should send you a check for your generous, free consultaton
services then? Okay. Make it out to "Mr. Dude", right? Hold on -
just let me go grab my checkbook. I'll be right back, I promise :) 
January 7, 2005 4:51:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

You don't need to care about the simplicity or lack of of the authoring
program. Read on and you will see why.

You have a selection of canned 'moments'. You will have to have taken each
of them all the way through the process of DVD creation right up to the
final point where you click the 'make dvd' button. You save each one as a
separate project.

You use audio recording program of your choice to let customer speak into
microphone while watching a copy of the video footage they have selected.
Many apps allow 'takes'. When a satisfactory 'take' has been recorded, the
tech saves it as a wave.

Tech then opens DVD authoring program, opens the appropriate project file.
Put the WAV file you have just recorded onto into the program. (You may want
an authoring program that accepts multiple audio tracks so you can already
have a crowd noise track laid down. )

Tech then pushes the 'author DVD button' and its all burned onto a dvd.
After burning down, tech peels off an apppropriate, pre printed dvd label
and sticks it on. Test it quick on a DVD player/TV just to make sure it
works, slip it into a case, give to customer and off they go.

Tech closes authoring app without saving, so you can start from the top with
the next customer.

So, because you have templates ready to insert a wav file into, you don't
care about the simplicity of the authoring app. YOu only need to teach your
tech how to record and save a wave file and put that file into a template.
Put dvd in burner, press author, test, put on label, done.




<yvan@ideasdesign.com> wrote in message
news:1105041083.456368.134830@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> Thank you Larry. I never meant to come across seeming rude in one of
> my earlier responses. I just didn't feel it was necessary to explain
> every detail of how I'd planned to approach this project, in the
> interest of getting an answer to the one outstanding question that I
> had.
>
> To clarify, . .the term "kiosk" might have been somewhat misleading, as
> this will not be a box that is intended to have all aspects of the dvd
> production being automated (even though that's be ideal). It will be
> manned by an individual, who will control the scene selection /
> previewing, the audio recording sessions, and the DVD production.
>
> Also, all potential copyright considerations have been thoroughly
> researched and relayed to the client, .. and they have already taken
> the necessary steps to secure the content (they are a high-profile
> sports radio station with all the right connections.)
>
> Sports moments will be no more 2 mins in length, and when recording the
> voicever, we intend to play appropriately selected background crowd
> noises to retain the needed sense of ambience.
>
> 2 PCS will be used: One to serve as the user interface for selecting
> and previewing the video clips, and for recording voiceovers, .. and
> the 2nd PC for the dvd authoring and burning. Both will be networked
> together, so that recorded WAV files can be quickly and easily
> transferred from one machine to the other.
>
> When previewing the sports moments, windows media files will be used.
> When recording audio voicevers, DV format video clips will be used
> which have the audio tracks replaced with crowd noises. When building
> the DVD, .. pre-created project files will be readily on hand, .. each
> of which will contain the specific already-endcoded MPEG2 files (video
> only), as well as the pre-created animated menu background.
>
> I am certainly fully capable of taking on the project, though I would
> not be the least bit reluctant to outsource it if was able to find the
> right candidate for it. By the way "Nap" (not sure what you're name
> is) -- you can email me at ideasdesignINC (dot com) - just add the inc
> to the previous address you tried to email me at.
>
> One again, -- thank you for your thoughtful and informative response :) 
> Cheers,
> - yvan
>
Anonymous
January 7, 2005 5:14:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Have you use Pinnacle Studio 9. I have 9 plus and have used 7 and 8.
Version 7 you lived with because for the time frame you were lucky to
get anything to work. Version 8 was a exercise in frustration if you
did not keep up with the changes and searched the internet for the
right files, etc. However, I have found version 9 to be very stable,
especially if you keep a clean machine and have a fast hard drive and
decent processor. Mine is a amd 2800 with 512 ram and 2 disk of over
400 gig. I have made a dozen recent movie from video I shot of my
grandkids and have been able to capture (Sony MiniDV) edit (I use a
lot of editing items) and burn with no problem. I think unless you
have used version 9 you can not base your version 8 experience. It
even has a choice to make a movie using a simple wizard which require
very little of the person.

On 7 Jan 2005 05:22:25 -0800, coldcase14@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

>To answer your original question, personally I would steer clear of
>Pinnacle Studio [versions 7-9].
>
>Having recently built a brand new system, I have had nothing but
>trouble with Pinnacle Studio 8. Yes, it is very easy to use and has a
>nice user interface. However, it currently intermittently burns DVD's,
>has invoked the DEP protection thru Windows XP for some unknown reason,
>and sporadically seems to stop the computer from going into Hibernate
>mode.
>
>>From what I've read on the Internet, this is not an isolated case
>either. Unfortunately, I cannot offer a solution as to an easier
>program although I will be upgrading to Adobe Premiere [quite costly
>though].
>
>Hope this helps
>
>Neo
Anonymous
January 7, 2005 5:14:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

....I second the vote for Studio 9...I had 8 and couldn't get it to work at
all.....took one more chance and bought S9 and everything works
great!....I've burnt 100s of DVDs and never had a coaster and it
automatically will compress up to 2hr. to fit on one disc...(I did recently
notice a small bug if the size is very close to 1 hr. in length at highest
quality, it incorrectly wouldn't compress it to fit on one disc.....I added
a few more minutes and it worked fine)
Len

--
Order the new "Accordion Evolution" video or DVD
http://users.accesscomm.ca/limbery/
"Donald Link" <linkd@mindspring.com> wrote in message
news:ir5tt05eadnv40ug5mbkdn6ndetq6349d0@4ax.com...
> Have you use Pinnacle Studio 9. I have 9 plus and have used 7 and 8.
> Version 7 you lived with because for the time frame you were lucky to
> get anything to work. Version 8 was a exercise in frustration if you
> did not keep up with the changes and searched the internet for the
> right files, etc. However, I have found version 9 to be very stable,
> especially if you keep a clean machine and have a fast hard drive and
> decent processor. Mine is a amd 2800 with 512 ram and 2 disk of over
> 400 gig. I have made a dozen recent movie from video I shot of my
> grandkids and have been able to capture (Sony MiniDV) edit (I use a
> lot of editing items) and burn with no problem. I think unless you
> have used version 9 you can not base your version 8 experience. It
> even has a choice to make a movie using a simple wizard which require
> very little of the person.
>
> On 7 Jan 2005 05:22:25 -0800, coldcase14@yahoo.co.uk wrote:
>
>>To answer your original question, personally I would steer clear of
>>Pinnacle Studio [versions 7-9].
>>
>>Having recently built a brand new system, I have had nothing but
>>trouble with Pinnacle Studio 8. Yes, it is very easy to use and has a
>>nice user interface. However, it currently intermittently burns DVD's,
>>has invoked the DEP protection thru Windows XP for some unknown reason,
>>and sporadically seems to stop the computer from going into Hibernate
>>mode.
>>
>>>From what I've read on the Internet, this is not an isolated case
>>either. Unfortunately, I cannot offer a solution as to an easier
>>program although I will be upgrading to Adobe Premiere [quite costly
>>though].
>>
>>Hope this helps
>>
>>Neo
>
Anonymous
January 7, 2005 10:13:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

On a sunny day (7 Jan 2005 10:48:20 -0800) it happened yvan@ideasdesign.com
wrote in <1105123700.267953.279170@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>:

>
>
>>> So, from this, if somebody says 'Linux is not an option' that shows
>he
>cannot play.
>
>I say Linux is not an option because I have no patience for dealing
>with this level of arrogance, which I encounter time and time again
>whenever I have to deal with diehard Linux advocates. You expelled
>quite the mouthful to insult me, you know. And really, all you did was
>reinforce my stance on all of this.
>
>I know how to use Linux, and have tinkered with many different
>distributions. But in my experience, it is NOT an OS best suited for
>multimedia applications. I've tried Kino, and Cinelerra, and MainActor,
>.. and all those other apps, and quite frankly,.. they just don't
>measure up to their equivalents on the Windows platform. Period. If
>you insist on turning this into another boring linux vs. windows
>thread, then by all means feel free. I can see where this discussion is
>headed, and it sure as hell doesn't have anything to do with my
>original question. WTF dude?
Well, I was not addressing you, if you could not get it together in Linux
not my problem.
You presented a problem, I gave a solution.
You do not want the solution, because you are not good enough with Linux.
Then have it your way, and likely never find one.
If you DO, in MS windows, make sure you let everybody here know.
Actually we are not here to solve your problems, and if this was business
(as it is not, it is for me just fun), then I would start saying 25000 Euro,
15000 up front, a bank guarantee for 10000, plus expenses.
Go ANYWHERE and compare prices.
For a turn key solution.
The advise you already got you should be thankful for, if not then you fail
to understand something.
But I am not in the market for this, I'd rather deal with experts.
And for you it is Mr Dude Sir!
Anonymous
January 21, 2005 8:25:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

DVD Workshop is a good , easy to use program made by Ulead
January 21, 2005 8:25:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

kjolemore@aol.com (Kjolemore) wrote:

>DVD Workshop is a good , easy to use program made by Ulead

Yeah, reasonable suggestion, but V3.0 has a really funny thing with
audio being imported as an "enhancement" to the video. 2.0 was more
straightforward.

Also it seems that the thing uses 32 bit addresses so that if you want
to do something with a clip > 2GB (e.g. tag a frame there) you will
find yourself looking at a frame in the first 2GB, not the one you
wanted. That only applies to grabbing frames for menus, etc - the
output video is fine. But it suggests a $29.95 program, not too noble.
Anonymous
January 24, 2005 3:39:07 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

On 21 Jan 2005 17:25:53 GMT, kjolemore@aol.com (Kjolemore) wrote:

>DVD Workshop is a good , easy to use program made by Ulead

It is a good one, and rather easy to use, but the easiest is Tmpgenc
DVDAuthor, a real no-brainer.
Anonymous
January 26, 2005 12:32:05 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

> in Unix programs were
>written to solve problems, and accept input from other programs.
>
>This results in that you can do something like:
>
>generate_video | add_subs | filter_rf | despeckle | resize |
>write_to_dvd
>faked filenames of cause.
>
>Just like a conveyer belt, the data starts at the left and is passed to
>the
>next utility, and the next, and the next.
>The '|' is a called a pipe, pretty much like pipes for data to connect
>the
>programs.
>It also means that if you are a bit creative you can make very nice
>things
>with simple scripts (the above is a script).

>Because of all this, one can do mucho complicated stuff with a few
>lines.....in Unix.
>Because of this MS was dead when it went GUI.

Avisynth (for Windows) can also do chained video editing using a
script too.
Anonymous
January 26, 2005 6:08:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

On a sunny day (Tue, 25 Jan 2005 21:32:05 -0600) it happened M.L.
<me@privacy.net> wrote in <gp3ev0pkjolki41cvl09248827ip0f9qqb@4ax.com>:

>
>> in Unix programs were
>>written to solve problems, and accept input from other programs.
>>
>>This results in that you can do something like:
>>
>>generate_video | add_subs | filter_rf | despeckle | resize |
>>write_to_dvd
>>faked filenames of cause.
>>
>>Just like a conveyer belt, the data starts at the left and is passed to
>>the
>>next utility, and the next, and the next.
>>The '|' is a called a pipe, pretty much like pipes for data to connect
>>the
>>programs.
>>It also means that if you are a bit creative you can make very nice
>>things
>>with simple scripts (the above is a script).
>
>>Because of all this, one can do mucho complicated stuff with a few
>>lines.....in Unix.
>>Because of this MS was dead when it went GUI.
>
>Avisynth (for Windows) can also do chained video editing using a
>script too.
That is good, but can it also send the output over DSL to an other country like this:

generate_video | add_subs | filter_rf | despeckle | resize | netcat -w 100 SOME_IP_ADDRESS SOMEPORT

?

This because there is no limit in WHAT you can chain in Unix.
There are several MS windows programs that allow scripting of the processing.
but a 'pipe' is abou sending data from one program to an otehr one (written by
somebody else).
!