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VHS to DVD

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  • DVD
  • Video
  • Graphics
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Anonymous
January 13, 2005 3:07:40 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Hello. We have a large pile of VHS Home Videos that we need to convert
to DVD. We have been told that a specialized machine for this purpose
will yield much better quality. Such machines seem to all cost upward
of $700, and we will only use it once.

I believe that I can assemble the parts that are necessary on my
computer for much less. I would need:
1) A DVD recorder (which standard should I use? What are good brands?)
2) A TV tuner and/or Video capture card (I know nothing about this,
tell me more)
3) Software (what kind? Where do I get it? What will it cost?)

I have other questions too.
Will there be a quality difference between the two methods?
When I once tried to rip DVDs I had sound sync problems. Will I have
more have how do I avoid them?
What else don't I know?

More about : vhs dvd

Anonymous
January 13, 2005 7:29:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

mscout1@techie.com wrote:
> Hello. We have a large pile of VHS Home Videos that we need to
convert
> to DVD. We have been told that a specialized machine for this purpose
> will yield much better quality. Such machines seem to all cost upward
> of $700, and we will only use it once.
>
> I believe that I can assemble the parts that are necessary on my
> computer for much less. I would need:
> 1) A DVD recorder (which standard should I use? What are good
brands?)
> 2) A TV tuner and/or Video capture card (I know nothing about this,
> tell me more)
> 3) Software (what kind? Where do I get it? What will it cost?)
>
> I have other questions too.
> Will there be a quality difference between the two methods?
> When I once tried to rip DVDs I had sound sync problems. Will I have
> more have how do I avoid them?
> What else don't I know?


If you are satisfied with a basic DVD copy of your videos, (no fancy
menus) you will get a good copy using a dvd recorder. These sell from
about $150 with an SVHS and DVD burner unit at around $300.

There are a number of businesses which will cut you the same basic DVD
for $9.95 per dvd.

Restriction in both is a limit of 2 hours of 'normal' VHS recording per
DVD.

What machine was suggested ?

There is a telecine machine but that is for transferring 8mm (or other)
film to video.

If you want to edit your video and create a dvd with scene selections
etc. you need a capture board. Analog for input from your VCR. Cards
start around $9 and go up into the hundreds. If your computer is a
little slow you will benefit from a capture card that has hardware
based conversion to mpeg. There are combined tv tuner and capture
cards. Haupage (possibly misspelled) seems to get good review.

To edit your video, add titles and burn your DVDs you could start with
Vegas Movie studio 4 bundled with DVD creator (I forget its exact
name). Pinnacle studio 9 av/dv comes with the hardware for capture (but
has a lot of bad comment on the forums)

You need a DVD burner.

You need a big chunk of disk space, preferably defraged for the video
files when burning to DVD.

I don't know what else you don't know. :) 

If you do a google search for 'analog video capture' or "vhs dvd
transfer'
you should get quite a few hits to look at.
Anonymous
January 13, 2005 8:28:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

1. easiest way?

VHS player into DVD recorder deck (eg. iLo at walmart for $150).

at 2hrs mode, you'll get video that basically looks like the
original VHS w/o too much work.

oops! looks like it's down to $138 today for a Balance DVD recorder at
walmart
http://www.walmart.com/catalog/product.gsp?product_id=3...

2. Cleaner?

VHS into DV converter into PC (eg. Canopus ADVC-100)

Post processing and image cleanup with VirtualDub filters, etc.

Then conversion into MPEG-2 using multi-pass high quality converter
for burning to disc. (www.videohelp.com)

----

Honestly, #1 at $138 is the easiest and simplest solution. You only
need to press play & recorder and change tapes/discs every 2 hours,
while getting you very high quality DVDs.

You can spend a bit more to buy a deck that has both VHS and DVD
recorder-in-one. This is even nicer because you don't have to fool with
external cables and one remote control button press will auto copy that
VHS to DVD.

But that's double at $278
http://www.walmart.com/catalog/product.gsp?product_id=2...
and given that a VHS is only <$40, it's not exactly worth it if you've
already got a VHS deck.
Related resources
Anonymous
January 13, 2005 9:50:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

<mscout1@techie.com> wrote in message
news:1105646860.808568.73990@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> Hello. We have a large pile of VHS Home Videos that we need to convert
> to DVD. We have been told that a specialized machine for this purpose
> will yield much better quality. Such machines seem to all cost upward
> of $700, and we will only use it once.
>
> I believe that I can assemble the parts that are necessary on my
> computer for much less. I would need:
> 1) A DVD recorder (which standard should I use? What are good brands?)
> 2) A TV tuner and/or Video capture card (I know nothing about this,
> tell me more)
> 3) Software (what kind? Where do I get it? What will it cost?)
>
> I have other questions too.
> Will there be a quality difference between the two methods?
> When I once tried to rip DVDs I had sound sync problems. Will I have
> more have how do I avoid them?
> What else don't I know?

Don't hesitate one second and buy a DVD recorder. I got a deal after new
year for a great Panasonic one for just $199, almost $100 off. Before that I
tried the computer based method, I found out it's an enormous amount of time
to transfer just one tape, and I had so many to transfer. I sold it back and
bought a recorder. Buy a DVD recorder, unless you prefer spending 24h per
tape instead of 2h, assuming the computer behaves relatively well (which is
not always the case). DVD recorders don't freeze, it's fast, simple,
wonderful to transfer tapes on DVD. If you like hassles, try with a computer
and waste your time and be unable to use your computer many hours a day! You
souldn't experience any sound sync problems. it's like copying from VHS to
VHS. If you want to copy a DVD you made on a new DVD using the recorder,
then you'll lose some quality, but you can do it with a DVD burner, no need
to buy a capture device.


Rat
Anonymous
January 13, 2005 11:28:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

http://www.doom9.org/index.html?/capture/start.html

--Leonid

mscout1@techie.com wrote:
: Hello. We have a large pile of VHS Home Videos that we need to convert
: to DVD. We have been told that a specialized machine for this purpose
: will yield much better quality. Such machines seem to all cost upward
: of $700, and we will only use it once.

: I believe that I can assemble the parts that are necessary on my
: computer for much less. I would need:
: 1) A DVD recorder (which standard should I use? What are good brands?)
: 2) A TV tuner and/or Video capture card (I know nothing about this,
: tell me more)
: 3) Software (what kind? Where do I get it? What will it cost?)

: I have other questions too.
: Will there be a quality difference between the two methods?
: When I once tried to rip DVDs I had sound sync problems. Will I have
: more have how do I avoid them?
: What else don't I know?
January 14, 2005 2:25:14 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

And not to forget www.videohelp.com where no doubt your question will get
many knowledgable answers.

Martin.

"Leonid Makarovsky" <venom@csa3.bu.edu> wrote in message
news:cs6ll7$i2n$1@news3.bu.edu...
> http://www.doom9.org/index.html?/capture/start.html
>
> --Leonid
>
> mscout1@techie.com wrote:
> : Hello. We have a large pile of VHS Home Videos that we need to convert
> : to DVD. We have been told that a specialized machine for this purpose
> : will yield much better quality. Such machines seem to all cost upward
> : of $700, and we will only use it once.
>
> : I believe that I can assemble the parts that are necessary on my
> : computer for much less. I would need:
> : 1) A DVD recorder (which standard should I use? What are good
> brands?)
> : 2) A TV tuner and/or Video capture card (I know nothing about this,
> : tell me more)
> : 3) Software (what kind? Where do I get it? What will it cost?)
>
> : I have other questions too.
> : Will there be a quality difference between the two methods?
> : When I once tried to rip DVDs I had sound sync problems. Will I have
> : more have how do I avoid them?
> : What else don't I know?
>
Anonymous
January 14, 2005 11:29:22 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

<< From: Leonid Makarovsky venom@csa3.bu.edu
Date: Thu, Jan 13, 2005 2:28 PM
Message-id: <cs6ll7$i2n$1@news3.bu.edu>

http://www.doom9.org/index.html?/capture/start.html

--Leonid

mscout1@techie.com wrote:
: Hello. We have a large pile of VHS Home Videos that we need to convert
: to DVD. We have been told that a specialized machine for this purpose
: will yield much better quality. Such machines seem to all cost upward
: of $700, and we will only use it once.

: I believe that I can assemble the parts that are necessary on my
: computer for much less. I would need:
: 1) A DVD recorder (which standard should I use? What are good brands?)
: 2) A TV tuner and/or Video capture card (I know nothing about this,
: tell me more)
: 3) Software (what kind? Where do I get it? What will it cost?)

: I have other questions too.
: Will there be a quality difference between the two methods?
: When I once tried to rip DVDs I had sound sync problems. Will I have
: more have how do I avoid them?
: What else don't I know?
>>


Why fool with all that equipment when he can get a Panasonic E85 with a 120 GIG
HD for $499 and probably less on line that will give you great transfers and as
a side benefit you get a great TV recording machine that can give you great
copies of movies on DVDs.
Anonymous
January 14, 2005 10:09:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

The simplest way using your computer is to get ADS Tech's dvdXpress for
about $100 then you can use either a CD-R or DVD-R burner.

Ule

David Chien <chiendh@uci.edu> wrote in
news:cs7772$kcq$1@news.service.uci.edu:

> 1. easiest way?
>
> VHS player into DVD recorder deck (eg. iLo at walmart for $150).
>
> at 2hrs mode, you'll get video that basically looks like the
> original VHS w/o too much work.
>
> oops! looks like it's down to $138 today for a Balance DVD recorder
> at walmart
> http://www.walmart.com/catalog/product.gsp?product_id=3...
> &type=19&dept=3944&path=0%3A3944%3A62055
>
> 2. Cleaner?
>
> VHS into DV converter into PC (eg. Canopus ADVC-100)
>
> Post processing and image cleanup with VirtualDub filters, etc.
>
> Then conversion into MPEG-2 using multi-pass high quality
> converter
> for burning to disc. (www.videohelp.com)
>
> ----
>
> Honestly, #1 at $138 is the easiest and simplest solution. You only
> need to press play & recorder and change tapes/discs every 2 hours,
> while getting you very high quality DVDs.
>
> You can spend a bit more to buy a deck that has both VHS and DVD
> recorder-in-one. This is even nicer because you don't have to fool
> with external cables and one remote control button press will auto
> copy that VHS to DVD.
>
> But that's double at $278
> http://www.walmart.com/catalog/product.gsp?product_id=2...
> 4&type=19&dept=3944&path=0%3A3944%3A62055%3A105664 and given that a
> VHS is only <$40, it's not exactly worth it if you've already got a
> VHS deck.
>
January 15, 2005 4:09:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

mscout1@techie.com wrote:

>Hello. We have a large pile of VHS Home Videos that we need to convert
>to DVD. We have been told that a specialized machine for this purpose
>will yield much better quality. Such machines seem to all cost upward
>of $700, and we will only use it once.
>
>I believe that I can assemble the parts that are necessary on my
>computer for much less. I would need:
>1) A DVD recorder (which standard should I use? What are good brands?)

I'd recommend the Pioneer DVR-520 (80 gig hard drive)or DVR-720 DVD
(160 gig hard drive) Recorder.
These recorders are frame accurate, don't have sync problems, are easy
to use and have a ton of features. They also have build in video
enhancers and noise filters, so the video recorded from VHS to DVD (or
to the built-in hard drive) can look better than the original VHS
video.

Regards Brian


>2) A TV tuner and/or Video capture card (I know nothing about this,
>tell me more)
>3) Software (what kind? Where do I get it? What will it cost?)
>
>I have other questions too.
>Will there be a quality difference between the two methods?
>When I once tried to rip DVDs I had sound sync problems. Will I have
>more have how do I avoid them?
>What else don't I know?
!