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Configure VPN Server for XP?

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Anonymous
December 1, 2004 5:46:35 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.work_remotely (More info?)

My office network is connected to a router which accesses the internet
through a static IP DSL service. All machines are XP Pro. What do I need to
do or acquire to setup a VPN server so that I can access it from home? I
found an article in Microsoft Support site on how to configure a VPN Server
in W2000 but can't find one for XP Pro.

Any suggestion is greatly appreciated.

More about : configure vpn server

Anonymous
December 1, 2004 9:49:18 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.work_remotely (More info?)

Go to Help and Support and search on the topic "incoming connections."

Note that there is almost no UI to setting up an incoming VPN--just a single
check-box, and setting up authorized users. You don't need to tell it which
interface to allow the VPN on--it automatically allows it on all interfaces.

You then need to forward ports appropriately through the router. If the
router is doing Nat, you want to choose a PPTP VPN, and in the router,
forward port 1723, TCP. The router also needs to forward all GRE protocol
traffic--this is IP type 47. Routers differ in how this is done--some older
Linksys boxes have a checkbox for it. Some routers take care of it
automatically--your router's support web site will have an article on how to
do this.

One note: It is easiest, in my experience, to go to properties of TCP/IP on
the incoming connection (either as part of the initial setup, or afterwards)
and set the IP addressing to give out a group of fixed addresses, rather
than depend on DHCP. Some routers don't seem to be able to handle giving
out DHCP for incoming VPN connections to an XP client. Pick a range of
addresses (4 or 5) on the same subnet as the router's DHCP, but outside the
range the router is giving out.

Remember that any VPN client is effectively on your network--pay special
attention to making sure they are virus-free and up to date on patches, and
that you use strong passwords.


"tiki2k" <tiki2k@home.not> wrote in message
news:uKTfhe$1EHA.2788@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> My office network is connected to a router which accesses the internet
> through a static IP DSL service. All machines are XP Pro. What do I need
> to
> do or acquire to setup a VPN server so that I can access it from home? I
> found an article in Microsoft Support site on how to configure a VPN
> Server
> in W2000 but can't find one for XP Pro.
>
> Any suggestion is greatly appreciated.
>
>
Anonymous
December 1, 2004 9:49:19 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.work_remotely (More info?)

Thank you.
The VPN setup for the Netgear router at the office end is a little different
it seems. It asks for:
"Local and Remote IPSec Identifier"
Local/Remote tunneling access from a range, to specific or any local address
Encryption Protocol
Key Life
IKE Life Time

Also, do I specify the VPN IP Address as the same static address the office
modem is on? Or do I need to buy more IP Address? B/c I tried pinging that
IP Address and I get nothing.

Bill Sanderson <Bill_Sanderson@msn.com.plugh.org> wrote in message
news:o 3#DiBA2EHA.2192@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> Go to Help and Support and search on the topic "incoming connections."
>
> Note that there is almost no UI to setting up an incoming VPN--just a
single
> check-box, and setting up authorized users. You don't need to tell it
which
> interface to allow the VPN on--it automatically allows it on all
interfaces.
>
> You then need to forward ports appropriately through the router. If the
> router is doing Nat, you want to choose a PPTP VPN, and in the router,
> forward port 1723, TCP. The router also needs to forward all GRE protocol
> traffic--this is IP type 47. Routers differ in how this is done--some
older
> Linksys boxes have a checkbox for it. Some routers take care of it
> automatically--your router's support web site will have an article on how
to
> do this.
>
> One note: It is easiest, in my experience, to go to properties of TCP/IP
on
> the incoming connection (either as part of the initial setup, or
afterwards)
> and set the IP addressing to give out a group of fixed addresses, rather
> than depend on DHCP. Some routers don't seem to be able to handle giving
> out DHCP for incoming VPN connections to an XP client. Pick a range of
> addresses (4 or 5) on the same subnet as the router's DHCP, but outside
the
> range the router is giving out.
>
> Remember that any VPN client is effectively on your network--pay special
> attention to making sure they are virus-free and up to date on patches,
and
> that you use strong passwords.
>
>
> "tiki2k" <tiki2k@home.not> wrote in message
> news:uKTfhe$1EHA.2788@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> > My office network is connected to a router which accesses the internet
> > through a static IP DSL service. All machines are XP Pro. What do I need
> > to
> > do or acquire to setup a VPN server so that I can access it from home? I
> > found an article in Microsoft Support site on how to configure a VPN
> > Server
> > in W2000 but can't find one for XP Pro.
> >
> > Any suggestion is greatly appreciated.
> >
> >
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
December 2, 2004 12:44:23 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.work_remotely (More info?)

Ahh--want to tell us the model of the router?

I may be mistaken, since I know very little about IPSec VPN's, but this
sounds as though the router is capable of terminating the VPN itself--i.e.
the router as VPN server. Might only be capable of automatically VPN'ing
into some fancier device, though.

If it is capable of being the end-point of an incoming VPN, you'll need
their docs on how to set it up, and whether or not proprietary VPN client
software is needed to talk to it.

You can probably ignore that aspect and just use normal port forwarding in
the device to forward to an XP machine, though. The trick will be finding
the terminology for the GRE protocol 47 stuff.



"tiki2k" <tiki2k@home.not> wrote in message
news:%23W1XLjA2EHA.524@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Thank you.
> The VPN setup for the Netgear router at the office end is a little
> different
> it seems. It asks for:
> "Local and Remote IPSec Identifier"
> Local/Remote tunneling access from a range, to specific or any local
> address
> Encryption Protocol
> Key Life
> IKE Life Time
>
> Also, do I specify the VPN IP Address as the same static address the
> office
> modem is on? Or do I need to buy more IP Address? B/c I tried pinging that
> IP Address and I get nothing.
>
> Bill Sanderson <Bill_Sanderson@msn.com.plugh.org> wrote in message
> news:o 3#DiBA2EHA.2192@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>> Go to Help and Support and search on the topic "incoming connections."
>>
>> Note that there is almost no UI to setting up an incoming VPN--just a
> single
>> check-box, and setting up authorized users. You don't need to tell it
> which
>> interface to allow the VPN on--it automatically allows it on all
> interfaces.
>>
>> You then need to forward ports appropriately through the router. If the
>> router is doing Nat, you want to choose a PPTP VPN, and in the router,
>> forward port 1723, TCP. The router also needs to forward all GRE
>> protocol
>> traffic--this is IP type 47. Routers differ in how this is done--some
> older
>> Linksys boxes have a checkbox for it. Some routers take care of it
>> automatically--your router's support web site will have an article on how
> to
>> do this.
>>
>> One note: It is easiest, in my experience, to go to properties of TCP/IP
> on
>> the incoming connection (either as part of the initial setup, or
> afterwards)
>> and set the IP addressing to give out a group of fixed addresses, rather
>> than depend on DHCP. Some routers don't seem to be able to handle giving
>> out DHCP for incoming VPN connections to an XP client. Pick a range of
>> addresses (4 or 5) on the same subnet as the router's DHCP, but outside
> the
>> range the router is giving out.
>>
>> Remember that any VPN client is effectively on your network--pay special
>> attention to making sure they are virus-free and up to date on patches,
> and
>> that you use strong passwords.
>>
>>
>> "tiki2k" <tiki2k@home.not> wrote in message
>> news:uKTfhe$1EHA.2788@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>> > My office network is connected to a router which accesses the internet
>> > through a static IP DSL service. All machines are XP Pro. What do I
>> > need
>> > to
>> > do or acquire to setup a VPN server so that I can access it from home?
>> > I
>> > found an article in Microsoft Support site on how to configure a VPN
>> > Server
>> > in W2000 but can't find one for XP Pro.
>> >
>> > Any suggestion is greatly appreciated.
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
December 2, 2004 11:44:58 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.work_remotely (More info?)

Wow that sounds quite intimidating.
The router is a Netgear FVS318. The manual was not very specific about VPN
setup.

Bill Sanderson <Bill_Sanderson@msn.com.plugh.org> wrote in message
news:#iaSYjB2EHA.1524@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Ahh--want to tell us the model of the router?
>
> I may be mistaken, since I know very little about IPSec VPN's, but this
> sounds as though the router is capable of terminating the VPN itself--i.e.
> the router as VPN server. Might only be capable of automatically VPN'ing
> into some fancier device, though.
>
> If it is capable of being the end-point of an incoming VPN, you'll need
> their docs on how to set it up, and whether or not proprietary VPN client
> software is needed to talk to it.
>
> You can probably ignore that aspect and just use normal port forwarding in
> the device to forward to an XP machine, though. The trick will be finding
> the terminology for the GRE protocol 47 stuff.
>
>
>
> "tiki2k" <tiki2k@home.not> wrote in message
> news:%23W1XLjA2EHA.524@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > Thank you.
> > The VPN setup for the Netgear router at the office end is a little
> > different
> > it seems. It asks for:
> > "Local and Remote IPSec Identifier"
> > Local/Remote tunneling access from a range, to specific or any local
> > address
> > Encryption Protocol
> > Key Life
> > IKE Life Time
> >
> > Also, do I specify the VPN IP Address as the same static address the
> > office
> > modem is on? Or do I need to buy more IP Address? B/c I tried pinging
that
> > IP Address and I get nothing.
> >
> > Bill Sanderson <Bill_Sanderson@msn.com.plugh.org> wrote in message
> > news:o 3#DiBA2EHA.2192@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> >> Go to Help and Support and search on the topic "incoming connections."
> >>
> >> Note that there is almost no UI to setting up an incoming VPN--just a
> > single
> >> check-box, and setting up authorized users. You don't need to tell it
> > which
> >> interface to allow the VPN on--it automatically allows it on all
> > interfaces.
> >>
> >> You then need to forward ports appropriately through the router. If
the
> >> router is doing Nat, you want to choose a PPTP VPN, and in the router,
> >> forward port 1723, TCP. The router also needs to forward all GRE
> >> protocol
> >> traffic--this is IP type 47. Routers differ in how this is done--some
> > older
> >> Linksys boxes have a checkbox for it. Some routers take care of it
> >> automatically--your router's support web site will have an article on
how
> > to
> >> do this.
> >>
> >> One note: It is easiest, in my experience, to go to properties of
TCP/IP
> > on
> >> the incoming connection (either as part of the initial setup, or
> > afterwards)
> >> and set the IP addressing to give out a group of fixed addresses,
rather
> >> than depend on DHCP. Some routers don't seem to be able to handle
giving
> >> out DHCP for incoming VPN connections to an XP client. Pick a range of
> >> addresses (4 or 5) on the same subnet as the router's DHCP, but outside
> > the
> >> range the router is giving out.
> >>
> >> Remember that any VPN client is effectively on your network--pay
special
> >> attention to making sure they are virus-free and up to date on patches,
> > and
> >> that you use strong passwords.
> >>
> >>
> >> "tiki2k" <tiki2k@home.not> wrote in message
> >> news:uKTfhe$1EHA.2788@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> >> > My office network is connected to a router which accesses the
internet
> >> > through a static IP DSL service. All machines are XP Pro. What do I
> >> > need
> >> > to
> >> > do or acquire to setup a VPN server so that I can access it from
home?
> >> > I
> >> > found an article in Microsoft Support site on how to configure a VPN
> >> > Server
> >> > in W2000 but can't find one for XP Pro.
> >> >
> >> > Any suggestion is greatly appreciated.
> >> >
> >> >
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
December 2, 2004 4:24:52 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.work_remotely (More info?)

OK.

Here's Netgears support page. On the right it mentions firmware versions.
One generally good idea is to update to the newest firmware--or at least
check how far back you are.

http://kbserver.netgear.com/products_automatic/FVS318.a...

You will also note a number of items relating to VPN issues on the right
under the firmware references, in "MISC"

This device can initiate up to 8 outbound IPSEC vpn tunnels. I don't know
that you need that capability, from what you've said.

It can also be the endpoint of an IPSEC VPN tunnel if you use their (vp01L)
proprietary vpn client software ($40 at amazon.com.)

For how to forward ports, see:

http://kbserver.netgear.com/kb_web_files/N101145.asp

You want to use the "add a service" method. To do PPTP VPN, use start port
and end port of 1723, and a name of your choice.
Hmm - you might look at the section for "Let an APplication use" to see
whether PPTP VPN is defined by the router already. If so--use the
predefined definition, which may open the GRE protocol as well.

OK - I found this PDF format faq:

www.netgear.com/pdf_docs/FVS318_FAQ.pdf

which states that PPTP and IPSEC passthrough are implemented--don't know
whether you'll find checkboxes for those somewhere or not, but PPTP
passthrough is what you need in addition to forwarding port 1723 to make a
PPTP VPN to an XP client work.

So:

1) forward port 1723 to the XP host machines fixed IP address in the router.
Make sure PPTP passthrough isn't disabled.
2) enable incoming connections and VPN on those connections in an XP host.'

3) If you have more than one machine behind the router, you can test the VPN
connection within the lan by creating an outbound VPN connection on that
second machine and "dialling" the IP of the machine you've set up as host.
If you can connect and authenticate, at least you know that the host is set
properly.

4) then you need to either use a dialup, or another location, to test
whether you can connect across the Internet through the router. You'll use
the fixed IP address of the router to connect.

You would be most secure, using the proprietary client for the router and
connecting to the router, using an IPSEC VPN. However, you may want to try
out the PPTP VPN just to see how the process works, and consider how useful
it will be for you,





"tiki2k" <tiki2k@home.not> wrote in message
news:%23KaWE5I2EHA.804@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> Wow that sounds quite intimidating.
> The router is a Netgear FVS318. The manual was not very specific about VPN
> setup.
>
> Bill Sanderson <Bill_Sanderson@msn.com.plugh.org> wrote in message
> news:#iaSYjB2EHA.1524@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>> Ahh--want to tell us the model of the router?
>>
>> I may be mistaken, since I know very little about IPSec VPN's, but this
>> sounds as though the router is capable of terminating the VPN
>> itself--i.e.
>> the router as VPN server. Might only be capable of automatically VPN'ing
>> into some fancier device, though.
>>
>> If it is capable of being the end-point of an incoming VPN, you'll need
>> their docs on how to set it up, and whether or not proprietary VPN client
>> software is needed to talk to it.
>>
>> You can probably ignore that aspect and just use normal port forwarding
>> in
>> the device to forward to an XP machine, though. The trick will be
>> finding
>> the terminology for the GRE protocol 47 stuff.
>>
>>
>>
>> "tiki2k" <tiki2k@home.not> wrote in message
>> news:%23W1XLjA2EHA.524@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>> > Thank you.
>> > The VPN setup for the Netgear router at the office end is a little
>> > different
>> > it seems. It asks for:
>> > "Local and Remote IPSec Identifier"
>> > Local/Remote tunneling access from a range, to specific or any local
>> > address
>> > Encryption Protocol
>> > Key Life
>> > IKE Life Time
>> >
>> > Also, do I specify the VPN IP Address as the same static address the
>> > office
>> > modem is on? Or do I need to buy more IP Address? B/c I tried pinging
> that
>> > IP Address and I get nothing.
>> >
>> > Bill Sanderson <Bill_Sanderson@msn.com.plugh.org> wrote in message
>> > news:o 3#DiBA2EHA.2192@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>> >> Go to Help and Support and search on the topic "incoming connections."
>> >>
>> >> Note that there is almost no UI to setting up an incoming VPN--just a
>> > single
>> >> check-box, and setting up authorized users. You don't need to tell it
>> > which
>> >> interface to allow the VPN on--it automatically allows it on all
>> > interfaces.
>> >>
>> >> You then need to forward ports appropriately through the router. If
> the
>> >> router is doing Nat, you want to choose a PPTP VPN, and in the router,
>> >> forward port 1723, TCP. The router also needs to forward all GRE
>> >> protocol
>> >> traffic--this is IP type 47. Routers differ in how this is done--some
>> > older
>> >> Linksys boxes have a checkbox for it. Some routers take care of it
>> >> automatically--your router's support web site will have an article on
> how
>> > to
>> >> do this.
>> >>
>> >> One note: It is easiest, in my experience, to go to properties of
> TCP/IP
>> > on
>> >> the incoming connection (either as part of the initial setup, or
>> > afterwards)
>> >> and set the IP addressing to give out a group of fixed addresses,
> rather
>> >> than depend on DHCP. Some routers don't seem to be able to handle
> giving
>> >> out DHCP for incoming VPN connections to an XP client. Pick a range
>> >> of
>> >> addresses (4 or 5) on the same subnet as the router's DHCP, but
>> >> outside
>> > the
>> >> range the router is giving out.
>> >>
>> >> Remember that any VPN client is effectively on your network--pay
> special
>> >> attention to making sure they are virus-free and up to date on
>> >> patches,
>> > and
>> >> that you use strong passwords.
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> "tiki2k" <tiki2k@home.not> wrote in message
>> >> news:uKTfhe$1EHA.2788@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>> >> > My office network is connected to a router which accesses the
> internet
>> >> > through a static IP DSL service. All machines are XP Pro. What do I
>> >> > need
>> >> > to
>> >> > do or acquire to setup a VPN server so that I can access it from
> home?
>> >> > I
>> >> > found an article in Microsoft Support site on how to configure a VPN
>> >> > Server
>> >> > in W2000 but can't find one for XP Pro.
>> >> >
>> >> > Any suggestion is greatly appreciated.
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >>
>> >>
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
December 6, 2004 4:06:44 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.work_remotely (More info?)

Thank you Bill for the extensive information. I will do the upgrade and see
if the wizard can simplify things any. You've been incredibly helpful.


"Bill Sanderson" <Bill_Sanderson@msn.com.plugh.org> wrote in message
news:o 8YH7wJ2EHA.524@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> OK.
>
> Here's Netgears support page. On the right it mentions firmware versions.
> One generally good idea is to update to the newest firmware--or at least
> check how far back you are.
>
> http://kbserver.netgear.com/products_automatic/FVS318.a...
>
> You will also note a number of items relating to VPN issues on the right
> under the firmware references, in "MISC"
>
> This device can initiate up to 8 outbound IPSEC vpn tunnels. I don't know
> that you need that capability, from what you've said.
>
> It can also be the endpoint of an IPSEC VPN tunnel if you use their
(vp01L)
> proprietary vpn client software ($40 at amazon.com.)
>
> For how to forward ports, see:
>
> http://kbserver.netgear.com/kb_web_files/N101145.asp
>
> You want to use the "add a service" method. To do PPTP VPN, use start
port
> and end port of 1723, and a name of your choice.
> Hmm - you might look at the section for "Let an APplication use" to see
> whether PPTP VPN is defined by the router already. If so--use the
> predefined definition, which may open the GRE protocol as well.
>
> OK - I found this PDF format faq:
>
> www.netgear.com/pdf_docs/FVS318_FAQ.pdf
>
> which states that PPTP and IPSEC passthrough are implemented--don't know
> whether you'll find checkboxes for those somewhere or not, but PPTP
> passthrough is what you need in addition to forwarding port 1723 to make a
> PPTP VPN to an XP client work.
>
> So:
>
> 1) forward port 1723 to the XP host machines fixed IP address in the
router.
> Make sure PPTP passthrough isn't disabled.
> 2) enable incoming connections and VPN on those connections in an XP
host.'
>
> 3) If you have more than one machine behind the router, you can test the
VPN
> connection within the lan by creating an outbound VPN connection on that
> second machine and "dialling" the IP of the machine you've set up as host.
> If you can connect and authenticate, at least you know that the host is
set
> properly.
>
> 4) then you need to either use a dialup, or another location, to test
> whether you can connect across the Internet through the router. You'll
use
> the fixed IP address of the router to connect.
>
> You would be most secure, using the proprietary client for the router and
> connecting to the router, using an IPSEC VPN. However, you may want to
try
> out the PPTP VPN just to see how the process works, and consider how
useful
> it will be for you,
>
>
>
>
>
> "tiki2k" <tiki2k@home.not> wrote in message
> news:%23KaWE5I2EHA.804@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> > Wow that sounds quite intimidating.
> > The router is a Netgear FVS318. The manual was not very specific about
VPN
> > setup.
> >
> > Bill Sanderson <Bill_Sanderson@msn.com.plugh.org> wrote in message
> > news:#iaSYjB2EHA.1524@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> >> Ahh--want to tell us the model of the router?
> >>
> >> I may be mistaken, since I know very little about IPSec VPN's, but this
> >> sounds as though the router is capable of terminating the VPN
> >> itself--i.e.
> >> the router as VPN server. Might only be capable of automatically
VPN'ing
> >> into some fancier device, though.
> >>
> >> If it is capable of being the end-point of an incoming VPN, you'll need
> >> their docs on how to set it up, and whether or not proprietary VPN
client
> >> software is needed to talk to it.
> >>
> >> You can probably ignore that aspect and just use normal port forwarding
> >> in
> >> the device to forward to an XP machine, though. The trick will be
> >> finding
> >> the terminology for the GRE protocol 47 stuff.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> "tiki2k" <tiki2k@home.not> wrote in message
> >> news:%23W1XLjA2EHA.524@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> >> > Thank you.
> >> > The VPN setup for the Netgear router at the office end is a little
> >> > different
> >> > it seems. It asks for:
> >> > "Local and Remote IPSec Identifier"
> >> > Local/Remote tunneling access from a range, to specific or any local
> >> > address
> >> > Encryption Protocol
> >> > Key Life
> >> > IKE Life Time
> >> >
> >> > Also, do I specify the VPN IP Address as the same static address the
> >> > office
> >> > modem is on? Or do I need to buy more IP Address? B/c I tried pinging
> > that
> >> > IP Address and I get nothing.
> >> >
> >> > Bill Sanderson <Bill_Sanderson@msn.com.plugh.org> wrote in message
> >> > news:o 3#DiBA2EHA.2192@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> >> >> Go to Help and Support and search on the topic "incoming
connections."
> >> >>
> >> >> Note that there is almost no UI to setting up an incoming VPN--just
a
> >> > single
> >> >> check-box, and setting up authorized users. You don't need to tell
it
> >> > which
> >> >> interface to allow the VPN on--it automatically allows it on all
> >> > interfaces.
> >> >>
> >> >> You then need to forward ports appropriately through the router. If
> > the
> >> >> router is doing Nat, you want to choose a PPTP VPN, and in the
router,
> >> >> forward port 1723, TCP. The router also needs to forward all GRE
> >> >> protocol
> >> >> traffic--this is IP type 47. Routers differ in how this is
done--some
> >> > older
> >> >> Linksys boxes have a checkbox for it. Some routers take care of it
> >> >> automatically--your router's support web site will have an article
on
> > how
> >> > to
> >> >> do this.
> >> >>
> >> >> One note: It is easiest, in my experience, to go to properties of
> > TCP/IP
> >> > on
> >> >> the incoming connection (either as part of the initial setup, or
> >> > afterwards)
> >> >> and set the IP addressing to give out a group of fixed addresses,
> > rather
> >> >> than depend on DHCP. Some routers don't seem to be able to handle
> > giving
> >> >> out DHCP for incoming VPN connections to an XP client. Pick a range
> >> >> of
> >> >> addresses (4 or 5) on the same subnet as the router's DHCP, but
> >> >> outside
> >> > the
> >> >> range the router is giving out.
> >> >>
> >> >> Remember that any VPN client is effectively on your network--pay
> > special
> >> >> attention to making sure they are virus-free and up to date on
> >> >> patches,
> >> > and
> >> >> that you use strong passwords.
> >> >>
> >> >>
> >> >> "tiki2k" <tiki2k@home.not> wrote in message
> >> >> news:uKTfhe$1EHA.2788@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> >> >> > My office network is connected to a router which accesses the
> > internet
> >> >> > through a static IP DSL service. All machines are XP Pro. What do
I
> >> >> > need
> >> >> > to
> >> >> > do or acquire to setup a VPN server so that I can access it from
> > home?
> >> >> > I
> >> >> > found an article in Microsoft Support site on how to configure a
VPN
> >> >> > Server
> >> >> > in W2000 but can't find one for XP Pro.
> >> >> >
> >> >> > Any suggestion is greatly appreciated.
> >> >> >
> >> >> >
> >> >>
> >> >>
> >> >
> >> >
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
>
>
!