Sony Vegas Movie Studio + DVD - any good?

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

I bought Sony Vegas Movie Studio + DVD basically because after all the
Fry's rebates it was almost free. I used to use Pinnacle 8 but it was
so buggy it was almost unusable sometimes. I really liked it's
interface though. Then I switched to ULead Video Studio 7. It
doesn't have all the bug problems but the interface just is not
intuitive to me. I was going to install the Sony Vegas Movie Studio +
DVD but then I read some Reviews of it and it didn't sound all that
great and rated lower then either Pinnacle or Ulead.

Any feedback from anyone appreciated - if it's not an improvement I
don't want to install yet another video editor.
--
Elbridge Gerry, of Massachusetts:

"What, sir, is the use of militia? It is to prevent the
establishment of a standing army, the bane of liberty. . .
Whenever Government means to invade the rights and liberties of
the people, they always attempt to destroy the militia, in order
to raise a standing army upon its ruins." -- Debate, U.S. House
of Representatives, August 17, 1789
11 answers Last reply
More about sony vegas movie studio good
  1. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    AZGuy wrote:
    > I bought Sony Vegas Movie Studio + DVD basically because after all the
    > Fry's rebates it was almost free. I used to use Pinnacle 8 but it was
    > so buggy it was almost unusable sometimes. I really liked it's
    > interface though. Then I switched to ULead Video Studio 7. It
    > doesn't have all the bug problems but the interface just is not
    > intuitive to me. I was going to install the Sony Vegas Movie Studio +
    > DVD but then I read some Reviews of it and it didn't sound all that
    > great and rated lower then either Pinnacle or Ulead.
    >
    > Any feedback from anyone appreciated - if it's not an improvement I
    > don't want to install yet another video editor.


    I personally use Vegas 5 & DVD Architect and find them to be one of the most
    solid apps I've ever used. Crashes are extremely rare. As far as poor
    reviews for Movie Studio go, did the reviewer actually spend a few months
    with the software and get to truly "learn" it? I really doubt it which is
    why I take most reviews with a big grain of salt. A recent review of Vegas
    mentioned several things it couldn't do. The reality was that, had the
    reviewer bothered to ask someone (or even read the manual), he would've
    found out how wrong he was and how easy it was to do the things he was
    complaining about.

    I have yet to read or hear anyone say anything bad about Movie Studio but
    I'd check out the user forum at
    http://mediasoftware.sonypictures.com/forums/ShowTopics.asp?ForumID=12
    though and read for yourself.

    Mike
  2. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    Can I guess that DVD Architect is the authoring component? Is it part
    of Vegas or a separate commercial program?

    "Mike Kujbida" <kujfam-misleadingspam@sympatico.ca> wrote:
    >I personally use Vegas 5 & DVD Architect and find them to be one of the most
    >solid apps I've ever used. Crashes are extremely rare. As far as poor
    >reviews for Movie Studio go, did the reviewer actually spend a few months
    >with the software and get to truly "learn" it? I really doubt it which is
    >why I take most reviews with a big grain of salt. A recent review of Vegas
    >mentioned several things it couldn't do. The reality was that, had the
    >reviewer bothered to ask someone (or even read the manual), he would've
    >found out how wrong he was and how easy it was to do the things he was
    >complaining about.
    >
    >I have yet to read or hear anyone say anything bad about Movie Studio but
    >I'd check out the user forum at
    > http://mediasoftware.sonypictures.com/forums/ShowTopics.asp?ForumID=12
    >though and read for yourself.
    >
    >Mike
  3. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    That's correct. You can buy Vegas separately or you can buy the two bundled
    together. DVD Architect is not available as a standalone purchase.
    Since you already have Movie Studio though (which has DVD authoring as part
    of it), I'd use it to become familiar with the work flow, tools, etc. Then,
    when you're ready for something more powerful, there is an upgrade path to
    the full version of Vegas or Vegas + DVDA.

    Mike


    JT wrote:
    > Can I guess that DVD Architect is the authoring component? Is it part
    > of Vegas or a separate commercial program?
    >
    > "Mike Kujbida" <kujfam-misleadingspam@sympatico.ca> wrote:
    >> I personally use Vegas 5 & DVD Architect and find them to be one of
    >> the most solid apps I've ever used. Crashes are extremely rare. As
    >> far as poor reviews for Movie Studio go, did the reviewer actually
    >> spend a few months with the software and get to truly "learn" it? I
    >> really doubt it which is why I take most reviews with a big grain of
    >> salt. A recent review of Vegas mentioned several things it couldn't
    >> do. The reality was that, had the reviewer bothered to ask someone
    >> (or even read the manual), he would've found out how wrong he was
    >> and how easy it was to do the things he was complaining about.
    >>
    >> I have yet to read or hear anyone say anything bad about Movie
    >> Studio but I'd check out the user forum at
    >> http://mediasoftware.sonypictures.com/forums/ShowTopics.asp?ForumID=12
    >> though and read for yourself.
    >>
    >> Mike
  4. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    Well, the Ulead products are pretty far from professional, and the
    authoring component isn't much of a "teacher" - 3.0 is especially
    quirky, and relatively limited in complexity. For anything I do, a
    single-level, single-language DVD is good enough, so it does the job.

    Encore, oth, offers much greater depth. Like everything from Adobe, I
    hated it at first. In this case, I still hate it. I learned the other
    day, for example, that I could not include more than one video clip
    on its timeline. Go back to Premiere and encode the entire project
    again, rather than just the tiny 'chapter' that was juste added.
    Hateful lack of maturity. So for that project, it was back to Ulead.
    For $30, go ahead and add all the video clips you want.

    So Ulead is puny, Encore is annoying. I need something more like
    Premiere in its maturity and sophistication.


    "Mike Kujbida" <kujfam-misleadingspam@sympatico.ca> wrote:

    >That's correct. You can buy Vegas separately or you can buy the two bundled
    >together. DVD Architect is not available as a standalone purchase.
    >Since you already have Movie Studio though (which has DVD authoring as part
    >of it), I'd use it to become familiar with the work flow, tools, etc. Then,
    >when you're ready for something more powerful, there is an upgrade path to
    >the full version of Vegas or Vegas + DVDA.
    >
    >Mike
    >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    On Sun, 23 Jan 2005 01:58:54 -0700, AZGuy <SPAMOUT@cox.net> wrote:

    >I bought Sony Vegas Movie Studio + DVD basically because after all the
    >Fry's rebates it was almost free. I used to use Pinnacle 8 but it was
    >so buggy it was almost unusable sometimes. I really liked it's
    >interface though. Then I switched to ULead Video Studio 7. It
    >doesn't have all the bug problems but the interface just is not
    >intuitive to me. I was going to install the Sony Vegas Movie Studio +
    >DVD but then I read some Reviews of it and it didn't sound all that
    >great and rated lower then either Pinnacle or Ulead.
    >
    >Any feedback from anyone appreciated - if it's not an improvement I
    >don't want to install yet another video editor.

    Why to people keep giving opinions on Pinnacle Studio 8 when Pinnacle
    Studio 9 and 9 Plus have been out nearly 9 months and stands heads or
    tails over version 8 in installation and usage ease. Capture, editing
    and burning all in one program with a ton of editing add ons. Sounds
    more like you need to give version 9 a try. Besides why pay attention
    to most complaints by the few vocal repeating posting when the
    thousand who are silent say very little.
  6. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    JT <NgPoster@missing.org> wrote:

    >
    >Encore, oth, offers much greater depth. Like everything from Adobe, I
    >hated it at first. In this case, I still hate it. I learned the other
    >day, for example, that I could not include more than one video clip
    >on its timeline. Go back to Premiere and encode the entire project
    >again, rather than just the tiny 'chapter' that was juste added.
    >Hateful lack of maturity. So for that project, it was back to Ulead.
    >For $30, go ahead and add all the video clips you want.
    >
    JT,

    Unfortunately, you missed the most basic feature of Encore, so it is
    understandable you are having problems.

    DVD authoring falls into two basic groups. Single timeline, and
    multiple timeline.

    In a single timeline program (like almost all of the basic authoring
    software) you put all of your video on a continuing line, one after
    the other. As the name implies, milti-timeline programs require you
    to place each separate element (except for stills) on a separate
    timeline.

    Each type of authoring has its good and bad points. It is far easier
    to "see" how a relatively simple project is coming together on a
    single timeline. However, a complex project is much easier and more
    straightforward on a multi-timeline program, and you simply cannot do
    some complex linking on a single timeline.

    Encore is a multi-timeline authoring program, like all professional
    authoring programs that I know of. You just add each new element
    (chapter or whatever) on a new timeline. Each timeline can then be
    linked to others as you like, and in an advanced program like Encore
    you can actually link a timeline to several others and have it act
    differently depending on how it is accessed, which you cannot do on a
    single timeline program.

    In Encore, each timeline will normally be a different Title (up to 99
    I believe) and each timeline can have up to 99 chapter marks in it.

    Also, in Encore if you want to have everything under one Title with
    many chapters, you have to encode your project as one big file, put it
    on one timeline and mark your chapters. If you want many Titles with
    only one or several chapters each, then you can put each segment on
    its own timeline and mark the individual chapters.

    So, it depends upon how you want your project built, as to whether or
    not you want to use a single timeline or multi-timeline program.

    If you just want to whip out a simple DVD, Encore is overkill. If you
    want to build a very complex DVD, you almost have to have a heavy-duty
    program like Encore. It really does help to read the manual and
    follow the tutorials.

    Hope this helps.

    Susan
  7. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    > program like Encore. It really does help to read the manual and
    > follow the tutorials.

    95% of problems people report in here would be alleviated if users would
    just follow your wise advice. Leaving the other 5% for the "What Is The BEST
    Software for...." crowd. <g>
  8. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    Thanks, Susan.

    I don't know how Adobe manages their projects, but the lack of
    consistency between related products is a pita.

    In Premiere, we can have as many video tracks in a project as we want
    (but afaik only one timeline) or if we wish we can tag disparate video
    onto the same track and select it for separate encoding by adjusting
    the workspace. I find it foolish to design a companion authoring
    program that requires the user to realize that multiple timelines are
    not only allowed but sometimes necessary. And the help certainly
    didn't address the issue, at least in an easy to find way.

    But that's Adobe. Some people think like their programmers, because I
    get flamed when I suggest their software is less than intuitive, but
    I'm in the other camp - capable tools, but needlessly hard to learn.

    Thanks for the helpful message, and don't consider yourself shot - I
    appreciate the input.


    Susan <nospam@nospam.net> wrote:

    >JT,
    >
    >Unfortunately, you missed the most basic feature of Encore, so it is
    >understandable you are having problems.
    >
    >DVD authoring falls into two basic groups. Single timeline, and
    >multiple timeline.
    >
    >In a single timeline program (like almost all of the basic authoring
    >software) you put all of your video on a continuing line, one after
    >the other. As the name implies, milti-timeline programs require you
    >to place each separate element (except for stills) on a separate
    >timeline.
    >
    >Each type of authoring has its good and bad points. It is far easier
    >to "see" how a relatively simple project is coming together on a
    >single timeline. However, a complex project is much easier and more
    >straightforward on a multi-timeline program, and you simply cannot do
    >some complex linking on a single timeline.
    >
    >Encore is a multi-timeline authoring program, like all professional
    >authoring programs that I know of. You just add each new element
    >(chapter or whatever) on a new timeline. Each timeline can then be
    >linked to others as you like, and in an advanced program like Encore
    >you can actually link a timeline to several others and have it act
    >differently depending on how it is accessed, which you cannot do on a
    >single timeline program.
    >
    >In Encore, each timeline will normally be a different Title (up to 99
    >I believe) and each timeline can have up to 99 chapter marks in it.
    >
    >Also, in Encore if you want to have everything under one Title with
    >many chapters, you have to encode your project as one big file, put it
    >on one timeline and mark your chapters. If you want many Titles with
    >only one or several chapters each, then you can put each segment on
    >its own timeline and mark the individual chapters.
    >
    >So, it depends upon how you want your project built, as to whether or
    >not you want to use a single timeline or multi-timeline program.
    >
    >If you just want to whip out a simple DVD, Encore is overkill. If you
    >want to build a very complex DVD, you almost have to have a heavy-duty
    >program like Encore. It really does help to read the manual and
    >follow the tutorials.
    >
    >Hope this helps.
    >
    >Susan
  9. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    rtfm is easy advice to give, often enough difficult to follow. Too
    often is a manual written by an english major hired for the job, and
    misses issues important to the user community.

    In the case at hand, if the answer "use multiple timelines" is in the
    manual, it is not readily indexed. I admit to having lost interest in
    the tutorial relatively quickly, and can't say that the matter wasn't
    discussed. Was it?

    "Chuck U. Farley" <chuckufarley@dyslexia.com> wrote:

    >> program like Encore. It really does help to read the manual and
    >> follow the tutorials.
    >
    >95% of problems people report in here would be alleviated if users would
    >just follow your wise advice. Leaving the other 5% for the "What Is The BEST
    >Software for...." crowd. <g>
    >
  10. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    On Mon, 24 Jan 2005 06:13:09 GMT, Donald Link <linkd@mindspring.com>
    wrote:

    >On Sun, 23 Jan 2005 01:58:54 -0700, AZGuy <SPAMOUT@cox.net> wrote:
    >
    >>I bought Sony Vegas Movie Studio + DVD basically because after all the
    >>Fry's rebates it was almost free. I used to use Pinnacle 8 but it was
    >>so buggy it was almost unusable sometimes. I really liked it's
    >>interface though. Then I switched to ULead Video Studio 7. It
    >>doesn't have all the bug problems but the interface just is not
    >>intuitive to me. I was going to install the Sony Vegas Movie Studio +
    >>DVD but then I read some Reviews of it and it didn't sound all that
    >>great and rated lower then either Pinnacle or Ulead.
    >>
    >>Any feedback from anyone appreciated - if it's not an improvement I
    >>don't want to install yet another video editor.
    >
    >Why to people keep giving opinions on Pinnacle Studio 8 when Pinnacle
    >Studio 9 and 9 Plus have been out nearly 9 months and stands heads or
    >tails over version 8 in installation and usage ease. Capture, editing
    >and burning all in one program with a ton of editing add ons. Sounds
    >more like you need to give version 9 a try. Besides why pay attention
    >to most complaints by the few vocal repeating posting when the
    >thousand who are silent say very little.


    Because Pin8 was such a nightmare. Constant bugs, updates that made
    it worse instead of better, tech support that was worse then useless.
    After that nightmare paying good money to them for their next great
    "update" was not in my playbook. If it's on sale cheap I might give
    it another try.
    --
    Elbridge Gerry, of Massachusetts:

    "What, sir, is the use of militia? It is to prevent the
    establishment of a standing army, the bane of liberty. . .
    Whenever Government means to invade the rights and liberties of
    the people, they always attempt to destroy the militia, in order
    to raise a standing army upon its ruins." -- Debate, U.S. House
    of Representatives, August 17, 1789
  11. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    JT wrote:
    > Thanks, Susan.
    >
    > I don't know how Adobe manages their projects, but the lack of
    > consistency between related products is a pita.
    >
    > In Premiere, we can have as many video tracks in a project as we want
    > (but afaik only one timeline) or if we wish we can tag disparate video
    > onto the same track and select it for separate encoding by adjusting
    > the workspace. I find it foolish to design a companion authoring
    > program that requires the user to realize that multiple timelines are
    > not only allowed but sometimes necessary. And the help certainly
    > didn't address the issue, at least in an easy to find way.
    >
    > But that's Adobe. Some people think like their programmers, because I
    > get flamed when I suggest their software is less than intuitive, but
    > I'm in the other camp - capable tools, but needlessly hard to learn.
    >
    > Thanks for the helpful message, and don't consider yourself shot - I
    > appreciate the input.
    >
    >
    >
    > Susan <nospam@nospam.net> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>JT,
    >>
    >>Unfortunately, you missed the most basic feature of Encore, so it is
    >>understandable you are having problems.
    >>
    >>DVD authoring falls into two basic groups. Single timeline, and
    >>multiple timeline.
    >>
    >>In a single timeline program (like almost all of the basic authoring
    >>software) you put all of your video on a continuing line, one after
    >>the other. As the name implies, milti-timeline programs require you
    >>to place each separate element (except for stills) on a separate
    >>timeline.
    >>
    >>Each type of authoring has its good and bad points. It is far easier
    >>to "see" how a relatively simple project is coming together on a
    >>single timeline. However, a complex project is much easier and more
    >>straightforward on a multi-timeline program, and you simply cannot do
    >>some complex linking on a single timeline.
    >>
    >>Encore is a multi-timeline authoring program, like all professional
    >>authoring programs that I know of. You just add each new element
    >>(chapter or whatever) on a new timeline. Each timeline can then be
    >>linked to others as you like, and in an advanced program like Encore
    >>you can actually link a timeline to several others and have it act
    >>differently depending on how it is accessed, which you cannot do on a
    >>single timeline program.
    >>
    >>In Encore, each timeline will normally be a different Title (up to 99
    >>I believe) and each timeline can have up to 99 chapter marks in it.
    >>
    >>Also, in Encore if you want to have everything under one Title with
    >>many chapters, you have to encode your project as one big file, put it
    >>on one timeline and mark your chapters. If you want many Titles with
    >>only one or several chapters each, then you can put each segment on
    >>its own timeline and mark the individual chapters.
    >>
    >>So, it depends upon how you want your project built, as to whether or
    >>not you want to use a single timeline or multi-timeline program.
    >>
    >>If you just want to whip out a simple DVD, Encore is overkill. If you
    >>want to build a very complex DVD, you almost have to have a heavy-duty
    >>program like Encore. It really does help to read the manual and
    >>follow the tutorials.
    >>
    >>Hope this helps.
    >>
    >>Susan
    >
    >

    Hey folks! The question was: " Sony Vegas Movie Studio + DVD - any good?"

    --
    Abrasha
    http://www.abrasha.com
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