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Remote Desktop Web Connection

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December 2, 2004 2:55:03 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.work_remotely (More info?)

In an article written by Charlie Russel,
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/networking/exp...
Under section 2 he states "You can use this page to connect to your Windows
XP Professional-based workstation, or any other computers on your network
that have Remote Desktop installed. Yup. You can use your own Windows XP
computer to act as a gateway to other computers on the network that are
running Terminal Services..."
here's the question: My co worker set up IIS on his xp pro home computer, he
is using a Linsys router on a broadband cable connection. Ports are open and
forwarding correctly. Dynamic Dns is set up and functioning correctly. From
work, we are able to get to the "tsweb" page on his home computer. On that
page, we attempted to enter the computer name of the computer on his home
network that we wanted to log into and it did not work. It worked if we
entered the public ip address or dyndns name that goes to the router. What's
wrong? Also, if he wants to connect to a different computer on the remote
network, would there have to be a separate port mapped to a separate computer
on the router? I was under the impression that all that we should have to do
is have port 3389 and port 80 (if using defaults) open to the IIS so that we
can use tsweb page as a gateway to connect to other computers on his network.
Is this true?
Anonymous
December 2, 2004 6:39:41 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.work_remotely (More info?)

I'll have to go back and read Charlie Russel's article.

No--it isn't (quite) that simple.

The router is what is restricting you from reaching multiple machines.

You either need a VPN connection into the LAN behind the router, or, a
modified DEFAULT.HTM page which sets different target PORT settings for the
different machines, and the router must be set to forward 3389 to machine A,
3390 to machine B, etc.

If you check the very recent thread subject headed "Connect to different
PC's on LAN and read through Al's linked threads, the info you need to make
these changes should be there.

If you can't find the thread, or have difficulty with the information
needed--write back!

The basic issue is that the router is a simple device. It has a single
public IP address, and it understands rules about passing packets on port X
to internal IP address Y. You connect to the web page, and upload the
ActiveX control. The ActiveX control is fed the port number and IP address
and must connect back through that same router. So--unless there is a
mechanism to give the ActiveX control different ports for different
machines, (i.e. the modified Default.HTM) and one to forward different ports
to different machines (i.e. settings in the router)--Web Connection can't
handle this.



"craig" <craig@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:24480F6F-D33B-4420-BF27-823EB92CFF74@microsoft.com...
> In an article written by Charlie Russel,
> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/networking/exp...
> Under section 2 he states "You can use this page to connect to your
> Windows
> XP Professional-based workstation, or any other computers on your network
> that have Remote Desktop installed. Yup. You can use your own Windows XP
> computer to act as a gateway to other computers on the network that are
> running Terminal Services..."
> here's the question: My co worker set up IIS on his xp pro home computer,
> he
> is using a Linsys router on a broadband cable connection. Ports are open
> and
> forwarding correctly. Dynamic Dns is set up and functioning correctly.
> From
> work, we are able to get to the "tsweb" page on his home computer. On
> that
> page, we attempted to enter the computer name of the computer on his home
> network that we wanted to log into and it did not work. It worked if we
> entered the public ip address or dyndns name that goes to the router.
> What's
> wrong? Also, if he wants to connect to a different computer on the remote
> network, would there have to be a separate port mapped to a separate
> computer
> on the router? I was under the impression that all that we should have to
> do
> is have port 3389 and port 80 (if using defaults) open to the IIS so that
> we
> can use tsweb page as a gateway to connect to other computers on his
> network.
> Is this true?
Anonymous
December 7, 2004 12:10:04 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.work_remotely (More info?)

Or that the Web Client ActiveX control runs on the local computer, not
the server.. The only job the server (in this case, IIS) has is to
feed you the ActiveX control which you run on your local machine. At
that point, it is close to the same as you running mstsc...
---
Jeffrey Randow (Windows Networking MVP)
jeffreyr-support@remotenetworktechnology.com

Please post all responses to the newsgroups for the benefit
of all USENET users. Messages sent via email may or may not
be answered depending on time availability....

Remote Networking Technology Support Site -
http://www.remotenetworktechnology.com
Windows Network Technology Community -
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/community/ce...
Windows Home Networking Community -
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/communiti...

On Thu, 2 Dec 2004 15:39:41 -0500, "Bill Sanderson"
<Bill_Sanderson@msn.com.plugh.org> wrote:

>I'll have to go back and read Charlie Russel's article.
>
>No--it isn't (quite) that simple.
>
>The router is what is restricting you from reaching multiple machines.
>
>You either need a VPN connection into the LAN behind the router, or, a
>modified DEFAULT.HTM page which sets different target PORT settings for the
>different machines, and the router must be set to forward 3389 to machine A,
>3390 to machine B, etc.
>
>If you check the very recent thread subject headed "Connect to different
>PC's on LAN and read through Al's linked threads, the info you need to make
>these changes should be there.
>
>If you can't find the thread, or have difficulty with the information
>needed--write back!
>
>The basic issue is that the router is a simple device. It has a single
>public IP address, and it understands rules about passing packets on port X
>to internal IP address Y. You connect to the web page, and upload the
>ActiveX control. The ActiveX control is fed the port number and IP address
>and must connect back through that same router. So--unless there is a
>mechanism to give the ActiveX control different ports for different
>machines, (i.e. the modified Default.HTM) and one to forward different ports
>to different machines (i.e. settings in the router)--Web Connection can't
>handle this.
>
>
>
>"craig" <craig@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
>news:24480F6F-D33B-4420-BF27-823EB92CFF74@microsoft.com...
>> In an article written by Charlie Russel,
>> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/networking/exp...
>> Under section 2 he states "You can use this page to connect to your
>> Windows
>> XP Professional-based workstation, or any other computers on your network
>> that have Remote Desktop installed. Yup. You can use your own Windows XP
>> computer to act as a gateway to other computers on the network that are
>> running Terminal Services..."
>> here's the question: My co worker set up IIS on his xp pro home computer,
>> he
>> is using a Linsys router on a broadband cable connection. Ports are open
>> and
>> forwarding correctly. Dynamic Dns is set up and functioning correctly.
>> From
>> work, we are able to get to the "tsweb" page on his home computer. On
>> that
>> page, we attempted to enter the computer name of the computer on his home
>> network that we wanted to log into and it did not work. It worked if we
>> entered the public ip address or dyndns name that goes to the router.
>> What's
>> wrong? Also, if he wants to connect to a different computer on the remote
>> network, would there have to be a separate port mapped to a separate
>> computer
>> on the router? I was under the impression that all that we should have to
>> do
>> is have port 3389 and port 80 (if using defaults) open to the IIS so that
>> we
>> can use tsweb page as a gateway to connect to other computers on his
>> network.
>> Is this true?
>
Related resources
Anonymous
December 7, 2004 1:43:06 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.work_remotely (More info?)

Much simpler description--I tend to put too many trees in my forest
pictures.

"Jeffrey Randow (MVP)" <jeffreyr-support@remotenetworktechnology.com> wrote
in message news:5m7ar01ic4152ltl0aqe968810fr5lqs2t@4ax.com...
> Or that the Web Client ActiveX control runs on the local computer, not
> the server.. The only job the server (in this case, IIS) has is to
> feed you the ActiveX control which you run on your local machine. At
> that point, it is close to the same as you running mstsc...
> ---
> Jeffrey Randow (Windows Networking MVP)
> jeffreyr-support@remotenetworktechnology.com
>
> Please post all responses to the newsgroups for the benefit
> of all USENET users. Messages sent via email may or may not
> be answered depending on time availability....
>
> Remote Networking Technology Support Site -
> http://www.remotenetworktechnology.com
> Windows Network Technology Community -
> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/community/ce...
> Windows Home Networking Community -
> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/communiti...
>
> On Thu, 2 Dec 2004 15:39:41 -0500, "Bill Sanderson"
> <Bill_Sanderson@msn.com.plugh.org> wrote:
>
>>I'll have to go back and read Charlie Russel's article.
>>
>>No--it isn't (quite) that simple.
>>
>>The router is what is restricting you from reaching multiple machines.
>>
>>You either need a VPN connection into the LAN behind the router, or, a
>>modified DEFAULT.HTM page which sets different target PORT settings for
>>the
>>different machines, and the router must be set to forward 3389 to machine
>>A,
>>3390 to machine B, etc.
>>
>>If you check the very recent thread subject headed "Connect to different
>>PC's on LAN and read through Al's linked threads, the info you need to
>>make
>>these changes should be there.
>>
>>If you can't find the thread, or have difficulty with the information
>>needed--write back!
>>
>>The basic issue is that the router is a simple device. It has a single
>>public IP address, and it understands rules about passing packets on port
>>X
>>to internal IP address Y. You connect to the web page, and upload the
>>ActiveX control. The ActiveX control is fed the port number and IP
>>address
>>and must connect back through that same router. So--unless there is a
>>mechanism to give the ActiveX control different ports for different
>>machines, (i.e. the modified Default.HTM) and one to forward different
>>ports
>>to different machines (i.e. settings in the router)--Web Connection can't
>>handle this.
>>
>>
>>
>>"craig" <craig@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
>>news:24480F6F-D33B-4420-BF27-823EB92CFF74@microsoft.com...
>>> In an article written by Charlie Russel,
>>> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/networking/exp...
>>> Under section 2 he states "You can use this page to connect to your
>>> Windows
>>> XP Professional-based workstation, or any other computers on your
>>> network
>>> that have Remote Desktop installed. Yup. You can use your own Windows XP
>>> computer to act as a gateway to other computers on the network that are
>>> running Terminal Services..."
>>> here's the question: My co worker set up IIS on his xp pro home
>>> computer,
>>> he
>>> is using a Linsys router on a broadband cable connection. Ports are
>>> open
>>> and
>>> forwarding correctly. Dynamic Dns is set up and functioning correctly.
>>> From
>>> work, we are able to get to the "tsweb" page on his home computer. On
>>> that
>>> page, we attempted to enter the computer name of the computer on his
>>> home
>>> network that we wanted to log into and it did not work. It worked if we
>>> entered the public ip address or dyndns name that goes to the router.
>>> What's
>>> wrong? Also, if he wants to connect to a different computer on the
>>> remote
>>> network, would there have to be a separate port mapped to a separate
>>> computer
>>> on the router? I was under the impression that all that we should have
>>> to
>>> do
>>> is have port 3389 and port 80 (if using defaults) open to the IIS so
>>> that
>>> we
>>> can use tsweb page as a gateway to connect to other computers on his
>>> network.
>>> Is this true?
>>
>
Anonymous
December 14, 2004 11:17:01 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.work_remotely (More info?)

I'm guilty of the same, unfortunately.. :) 
---
Jeffrey Randow (Windows Networking MVP)
jeffreyr-support@remotenetworktechnology.com

Please post all responses to the newsgroups for the benefit
of all USENET users. Messages sent via email may or may not
be answered depending on time availability....

Remote Networking Technology Support Site -
http://www.remotenetworktechnology.com
Windows Network Technology Community -
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/community/ce...
Windows Home Networking Community -
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/communiti...

On Mon, 6 Dec 2004 22:43:06 -0500, "Bill Sanderson"
<Bill_Sanderson@msn.com.plugh.org> wrote:

>Much simpler description--I tend to put too many trees in my forest
>pictures.
>
>"Jeffrey Randow (MVP)" <jeffreyr-support@remotenetworktechnology.com> wrote
>in message news:5m7ar01ic4152ltl0aqe968810fr5lqs2t@4ax.com...
>> Or that the Web Client ActiveX control runs on the local computer, not
>> the server.. The only job the server (in this case, IIS) has is to
>> feed you the ActiveX control which you run on your local machine. At
>> that point, it is close to the same as you running mstsc...
>> ---
>> Jeffrey Randow (Windows Networking MVP)
>> jeffreyr-support@remotenetworktechnology.com
>>
>> Please post all responses to the newsgroups for the benefit
>> of all USENET users. Messages sent via email may or may not
>> be answered depending on time availability....
>>
>> Remote Networking Technology Support Site -
>> http://www.remotenetworktechnology.com
>> Windows Network Technology Community -
>> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2003/community/ce...
>> Windows Home Networking Community -
>> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/communiti...
>>
>> On Thu, 2 Dec 2004 15:39:41 -0500, "Bill Sanderson"
>> <Bill_Sanderson@msn.com.plugh.org> wrote:
>>
>>>I'll have to go back and read Charlie Russel's article.
>>>
>>>No--it isn't (quite) that simple.
>>>
>>>The router is what is restricting you from reaching multiple machines.
>>>
>>>You either need a VPN connection into the LAN behind the router, or, a
>>>modified DEFAULT.HTM page which sets different target PORT settings for
>>>the
>>>different machines, and the router must be set to forward 3389 to machine
>>>A,
>>>3390 to machine B, etc.
>>>
>>>If you check the very recent thread subject headed "Connect to different
>>>PC's on LAN and read through Al's linked threads, the info you need to
>>>make
>>>these changes should be there.
>>>
>>>If you can't find the thread, or have difficulty with the information
>>>needed--write back!
>>>
>>>The basic issue is that the router is a simple device. It has a single
>>>public IP address, and it understands rules about passing packets on port
>>>X
>>>to internal IP address Y. You connect to the web page, and upload the
>>>ActiveX control. The ActiveX control is fed the port number and IP
>>>address
>>>and must connect back through that same router. So--unless there is a
>>>mechanism to give the ActiveX control different ports for different
>>>machines, (i.e. the modified Default.HTM) and one to forward different
>>>ports
>>>to different machines (i.e. settings in the router)--Web Connection can't
>>>handle this.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>"craig" <craig@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
>>>news:24480F6F-D33B-4420-BF27-823EB92CFF74@microsoft.com...
>>>> In an article written by Charlie Russel,
>>>> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/networking/exp...
>>>> Under section 2 he states "You can use this page to connect to your
>>>> Windows
>>>> XP Professional-based workstation, or any other computers on your
>>>> network
>>>> that have Remote Desktop installed. Yup. You can use your own Windows XP
>>>> computer to act as a gateway to other computers on the network that are
>>>> running Terminal Services..."
>>>> here's the question: My co worker set up IIS on his xp pro home
>>>> computer,
>>>> he
>>>> is using a Linsys router on a broadband cable connection. Ports are
>>>> open
>>>> and
>>>> forwarding correctly. Dynamic Dns is set up and functioning correctly.
>>>> From
>>>> work, we are able to get to the "tsweb" page on his home computer. On
>>>> that
>>>> page, we attempted to enter the computer name of the computer on his
>>>> home
>>>> network that we wanted to log into and it did not work. It worked if we
>>>> entered the public ip address or dyndns name that goes to the router.
>>>> What's
>>>> wrong? Also, if he wants to connect to a different computer on the
>>>> remote
>>>> network, would there have to be a separate port mapped to a separate
>>>> computer
>>>> on the router? I was under the impression that all that we should have
>>>> to
>>>> do
>>>> is have port 3389 and port 80 (if using defaults) open to the IIS so
>>>> that
>>>> we
>>>> can use tsweb page as a gateway to connect to other computers on his
>>>> network.
>>>> Is this true?
>>>
>>
>
!