smaller video format to facilitate prototype editing on a ..

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

I want to bring 6 hours' worth of video to a client's place on a laptop,
edit the video according to his likings, then come back and produce the
video for real.

It would be nice if I can compress the original DV video into an another
format that uses less space and is faster to edit/render and can be edited
in premiere. Quality is not critical; all that is needed is being able to
see where the cuts occur and the transitions. I have 60G on my laptop. I
also have an external USB drive, but would rather not lug it around.

Any suggestions on what video format to use for this purpose? I tried an
experiment using premiere by picking a random video codec and specifying a
smaller resolution (320x240) and then encountered an error saying the codec
cannot handle the resolution. I figured instead of trying all the windows'
built-in video codec one by one, maybe I can get results quicker by asking
here.
3 answers Last reply
More about smaller video format facilitate prototype editing
  1. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    Well, then don't use the random codec!!!

    Not a Premire user, but I would imagine the process to be the same. Use a
    different codec. Dunno what you all have but your not limited to Avi, you
    could do a WMV or a Mov. I'm sure you must have something there that will
    create what basically is a file intended for high bandwidth internet use.


    "peter" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    news:onsOd.617$uc.453@trnddc01...
    > I want to bring 6 hours' worth of video to a client's place on a laptop,
    > edit the video according to his likings, then come back and produce the
    > video for real.
    >
    > It would be nice if I can compress the original DV video into an another
    > format that uses less space and is faster to edit/render and can be edited
    > in premiere. Quality is not critical; all that is needed is being able to
    > see where the cuts occur and the transitions. I have 60G on my laptop. I
    > also have an external USB drive, but would rather not lug it around.
    >
    > Any suggestions on what video format to use for this purpose? I tried an
    > experiment using premiere by picking a random video codec and specifying a
    > smaller resolution (320x240) and then encountered an error saying the
    codec
    > cannot handle the resolution. I figured instead of trying all the windows'
    > built-in video codec one by one, maybe I can get results quicker by asking
    > here.
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    RS wrote:
    >
    > Well, then don't use the random codec!!!
    >
    > Not a Premire user, but I would imagine the process to be the same. Use a
    > different codec. Dunno what you all have but your not limited to Avi, you
    > could do a WMV or a Mov. I'm sure you must have something there that will
    > create what basically is a file intended for high bandwidth internet use.
    >
    > "peter" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
    > news:onsOd.617$uc.453@trnddc01...
    > > I want to bring 6 hours' worth of video to a client's place on a laptop,
    > > edit the video according to his likings, then come back and produce the
    > > video for real.
    > >
    > > It would be nice if I can compress the original DV video into an another
    > > format that uses less space and is faster to edit/render and can be edited
    > > in premiere. Quality is not critical; all that is needed is being able to
    > > see where the cuts occur and the transitions. I have 60G on my laptop. I
    > > also have an external USB drive, but would rather not lug it around.
    > >
    > > Any suggestions on what video format to use for this purpose? I tried an
    > > experiment using premiere by picking a random video codec and specifying a
    > > smaller resolution (320x240) and then encountered an error saying the
    > codec
    > > cannot handle the resolution. I figured instead of trying all the windows'
    > > built-in video codec one by one, maybe I can get results quicker by asking
    > > here.
    > >
    > >
    I do not know if it is compatable with Premere, but Studio 9 can do a
    low resolution capture to save space. You do all your editing, and when
    you are ready to finish the project, Studio will re-capture your
    original video, skipping the parts that you edited out.
  3. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    On Wed, 09 Feb 2005 18:11:32 GMT, peter wrote:

    > I want to bring 6 hours' worth of video to a client's place on a laptop,
    > edit the video according to his likings, then come back and produce the
    > video for real.
    >
    > It would be nice if I can compress the original DV video into an another
    > format that uses less space and is faster to edit/render and can be edited
    > in premiere. Quality is not critical; all that is needed is being able to
    > see where the cuts occur and the transitions. I have 60G on my laptop. I
    > also have an external USB drive, but would rather not lug it around.
    >
    > Any suggestions on what video format to use for this purpose?

    I've a smiliar problem. I use Windows Media Video 9 with One-Pass CBR at
    100000, simple decoder complexity, fastest performance, frame-rate down
    sampling 5:1. But my video is short (several minutes), I don't know if the
    performance would be acceptable for a video of 6 hours.


    Cristina
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