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Remote Assistance

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Anonymous
January 22, 2005 12:15:05 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.work_remotely (More info?)

Whenever someone tries to e-mail me a remote assistance
invitation, I have to modify it because they are using a
DSL modem which has it's own IP address. Sometimes it
doesn't work. I get "Remote host name could not be
resolved." My question is: doesn't XP's Remote Assistance
feature have the ability to detect additional IP
addresses that it needs to ad to the invitation in order
for it to work, like with a DSL or Cable modem?
Thanks!

More about : remote assistance

Anonymous
January 22, 2005 5:23:54 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.work_remotely (More info?)

Bill Thorngate <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

> Whenever someone tries to e-mail me a remote assistance
> invitation, I have to modify it because they are using a
> DSL modem which has it's own IP address. Sometimes it
> doesn't work. I get "Remote host name could not be
> resolved." My question is: doesn't XP's Remote Assistance
> feature have the ability to detect additional IP
> addresses that it needs to ad to the invitation in order
> for it to work, like with a DSL or Cable modem?

Yes, Remote Assistance can do all of this automatically, providing that the
NAT router at the Novice's end (the one requesting assistance) has UPnP
supported, enabled, and working. In adddition, the Novice's firewall must
permit both (a) UPnP traffic and (b) Remote Assistance traffic into the PC.
Also, in the Novice's XP, the SSDP Service must be running (this is true by
default).

With the above conditions satisfied, when the Novice requests Remote
Assistance, the RA application uses UPnP to discover the WAN IP address of
the DSL router/modem so that it can write that IP address into the request
ticket. The RA application also uses UPnP to automatically configure the
inward port-forwards required for the RA session.

If the Novice's router does not support UPnP, then frankly it is easier to
throw it out and get one that does, rather than fiddle around trying to get
RA to work efficiently.

--
Robin Walker [MVP Networking]
rdhw@cam.ac.uk
Anonymous
January 22, 2005 5:23:55 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.work_remotely (More info?)

Thank You Robin.

>-----Original Message-----
>Bill Thorngate <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com>
wrote:
>
>> Whenever someone tries to e-mail me a remote assistance
>> invitation, I have to modify it because they are using
a
>> DSL modem which has it's own IP address. Sometimes it
>> doesn't work. I get "Remote host name could not be
>> resolved." My question is: doesn't XP's Remote
Assistance
>> feature have the ability to detect additional IP
>> addresses that it needs to ad to the invitation in
order
>> for it to work, like with a DSL or Cable modem?
>
>Yes, Remote Assistance can do all of this automatically,
providing that the
>NAT router at the Novice's end (the one requesting
assistance) has UPnP
>supported, enabled, and working. In adddition, the
Novice's firewall must
>permit both (a) UPnP traffic and (b) Remote Assistance
traffic into the PC.
>Also, in the Novice's XP, the SSDP Service must be
running (this is true by
>default).
>
>With the above conditions satisfied, when the Novice
requests Remote
>Assistance, the RA application uses UPnP to discover the
WAN IP address of
>the DSL router/modem so that it can write that IP
address into the request
>ticket. The RA application also uses UPnP to
automatically configure the
>inward port-forwards required for the RA session.
>
>If the Novice's router does not support UPnP, then
frankly it is easier to
>throw it out and get one that does, rather than fiddle
around trying to get
>RA to work efficiently.
>
>--
>Robin Walker [MVP Networking]
>rdhw@cam.ac.uk
>
>
>.
>
Related resources
Anonymous
January 22, 2005 5:23:56 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.work_remotely (More info?)

Yeah it did ad the WAN IP of the modem. I set the SSDP
and UPnP to start automatically. Is that ok? If so then
thank you very much.

>-----Original Message-----
>Thank You Robin.
>
>>-----Original Message-----
>>Bill Thorngate <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com>
>wrote:
>>
>>> Whenever someone tries to e-mail me a remote
assistance
>>> invitation, I have to modify it because they are
using
>a
>>> DSL modem which has it's own IP address. Sometimes it
>>> doesn't work. I get "Remote host name could not be
>>> resolved." My question is: doesn't XP's Remote
>Assistance
>>> feature have the ability to detect additional IP
>>> addresses that it needs to ad to the invitation in
>order
>>> for it to work, like with a DSL or Cable modem?
>>
>>Yes, Remote Assistance can do all of this
automatically,
>providing that the
>>NAT router at the Novice's end (the one requesting
>assistance) has UPnP
>>supported, enabled, and working. In adddition, the
>Novice's firewall must
>>permit both (a) UPnP traffic and (b) Remote Assistance
>traffic into the PC.
>>Also, in the Novice's XP, the SSDP Service must be
>running (this is true by
>>default).
>>
>>With the above conditions satisfied, when the Novice
>requests Remote
>>Assistance, the RA application uses UPnP to discover
the
>WAN IP address of
>>the DSL router/modem so that it can write that IP
>address into the request
>>ticket. The RA application also uses UPnP to
>automatically configure the
>>inward port-forwards required for the RA session.
>>
>>If the Novice's router does not support UPnP, then
>frankly it is easier to
>>throw it out and get one that does, rather than fiddle
>around trying to get
>>RA to work efficiently.
>>
>>--
>>Robin Walker [MVP Networking]
>>rdhw@cam.ac.uk
>>
>>
>>.
>>
>.
>
Anonymous
January 23, 2005 5:27:55 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.work_remotely (More info?)

Bill Thorngate <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

> Yeah it did ad the WAN IP of the modem. I set the SSDP
> and UPnP to start automatically. Is that ok?

You only need SSDP Discovery Service to be running: it will start correctly
if left on "Manual".

You do not need the "Universal Plug and Play Device Host" to be running:
leave it set to "Manual" start.

--
Robin Walker [MVP Networking]
rdhw@cam.ac.uk
!