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The Earliest Documented Case of Data Theft Was in 1962

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February 1, 2012 1:03:47 PM

Quote:
"There was a way to request files to be printed offline by submitting a punched card," Wired quotes Dr. Allan Scherr as saying. "Late one Friday night, I submitted a request to print the password files...

Never give this sneaky PhD guy access to Active Directory Users and Computers. :p 
February 1, 2012 1:25:03 PM

data exists since humankind exists.
February 1, 2012 2:01:43 PM

"To spread the guilt around, Scherr then handed the passwords over to other users. One of them — J.C.R. Licklieder — promptly started logging into the account of the computer lab’s director Robert Fano, and leaving “taunting messages” behind."

And apparently the first trolling incident too... :D  :p 

I could see it now, "Mr. Fano, Are you mad , brother?"
February 1, 2012 2:05:04 PM

There was this caveman who used to draw crude maps of good foraging and hunting spots on his cave's walls. One day, a fellow caveman saw his drawings and stole his spots. True story.
February 1, 2012 2:15:27 PM

Summary: Nothing ever changes

So good luck to any law change that says otherwise.
February 1, 2012 2:23:36 PM

This is a funny story for sure, I laughed imagining the whole thing going on.

But the article should be named "The Earliest Documented Case of DIGITAL Data Theft Was in 1962", because "data" exists for thousands of years :) 
February 1, 2012 2:41:31 PM

Interesting bit of computer trivia.
February 1, 2012 2:57:44 PM

I like these articles, and similar ones that HowToGeek has been running too...fun to get a little geeky trivia each day.
February 2, 2012 4:58:13 AM

billybobserSummary: Nothing ever changesSo good luck to any law change that says otherwise.


Nothing ever changes, in that people like their doom and gloom. Hey, guess what? You can make this world a better place. Oh, and don't make more babies. Those already living are going to want trees in 30 years.
!