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PAL video camera for NTSC end product?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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Anonymous
March 10, 2005 2:28:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.production,rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Here's the reference: http://www.videolikefilm.com/FOVprep.html

___________________________

Shoot PAL

PAL video runs at 25fps, which is much closer to 24 than NTSC's 30fps.
When we Bullet PAL video we use every frame 1:1, meaning that motion
artifacts are eliminated completely. On top of that, PAL has a higher
spatial resolution than NTSC, so you get more pixels in your image. If you
can gain access to a PAL camera, the results will in most cases be worth the
trouble. Of course Magic Bullet works great on NTSC video too, but you
already knew that. Note that there is a 4% slow down when PAL is converted
to NTSC or FILM. This is generally not noticable.

___________________________

Comments on this?

I don't do ENG and to date all my work outputs on a DVD (NTSC mind you...).
Any reason I wouldn't consider a PAL video camera?

Chris
Anonymous
March 11, 2005 11:28:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.production,rec.video.desktop (More info?)

C.J.Patten wrote:

> Here's the reference: http://www.videolikefilm.com/FOVprep.html
> Shoot PAL [...] PAL video runs at 25fps, which is much closer to 24
> than NTSC's 30fps.
> [...]
>
> Comments on this? [...] Any reason I wouldn't consider a PAL video
> camera?

If I understood your intention correctly, you would like to shoot in PAL
for getting 1) a more "film-like" motion quality and 2) a better spatial
resolution.

Can't see any reason why this approach wouldn't work, but you will need
to make sure that the PAL camcorder you choose for the job can really
shoot in proper 25 fps progressive mode, utilizing the full resolution
of the CCD for each frame. (Some early progressive mode camcorders
implemented the thing by dropping each other field and interpolating the
missing lines in the remaining ones, which is probably not the way you
want it.) Also, there are probably still some camcorders that don't
offer a progressive mode at all, but only shoot in a 50 fields per
second interlaced mode. So check the specifications before purchasing
anything.

A 4% speed difference will, of course, require post-processing the audio
as well (time-stretching/resampling) but this shouldn't be a big deal
with today's software.

The idea of shooting in PAL for a filmic effect in an NTSC land has been
discussed on this newsgroup several times before. Perhaps you would like
to do a Google Groups search on it.

--
znark
!