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FYI: Pal to NTSC DVD conversion quick-guide

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Anonymous
March 28, 2005 8:24:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Ever do one of those things where you master a Pal DVD (25fps) and
suddenly need to dig it out and show it years laster, but it needs to be
in NTSC?

well, if that's the case, here's the easy steps I figured out:
1. Extract VOBs to a single VOB on the HD.
Use DVDDecrypter in File mode, but change the settings so that it
outputs as one file (ie. one VOB for the entire video).
Ignore all other settings.
2. Now, use VirtualDub MPEG-2 version
http://fcchandler.home.comcast.net/stable/
Open up that big VOB.
3. Select appropriate audio and video output compression settings and
save the new AVI file to the HD.

Here, if you're outputting back to DV format AVI, you simply match
both to the standard specs.
For speed, I used PicVideo's MJPEG encoder - it's super fast
(alternative is Huffyuv, which is also very fast) at recompressing,
faster than DV output.
Audio, you can go WAV, MP3, AAC, etc. whatever you prefer. WAV will
retain the original sound w/o further compression.

4. Now that you've got the output, you can reencode with any DVD
mastering program you have into a new NTSC DVD disc. (most do it
automatically Pal to NTSC frame rate conversion if you ask; else, dump
into Vegas Video, set the project properties to output a standard NTSC
DV video, and render to DV or final MPEG-2 file to disk, then burn that.)

Whew!

Basically, on a 3Ghz P4 PC, expect to spend about 4-6 hours per hour of
original video to process from 1-4 above.

Why the world never settled on one video format is beyond me.....!

More about : fyi pal ntsc dvd conversion quick guide

Anonymous
March 29, 2005 6:06:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

On Mon, 28 Mar 2005 16:24:58 -0800, David Chien <chiendh@uci.edu>
wrote:

>Ever do one of those things where you master a Pal DVD (25fps) and
>suddenly need to dig it out and show it years laster, but it needs to be
>in NTSC?
>
>well, if that's the case, here's the easy steps I figured out:

(snip)

Okay, first question: why do you go through the step of saving
it out as an AVI? Why not simply feed your extracted MPEG file into
the MPEG encoder and reencode it as PAL?

Second question: Do you know that there are better ways to do
the PAL to NTSC conversion than this?
-----------------------------------------------------
Neil Nadelman arvy@navzr-genafyngbe.pbz (ROT13)
-----------------------------------------------------
I have no fears in life,
for I have already survived Theta-G!
Anonymous
March 29, 2005 6:06:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"Neil Nadelman" wrote ...
> Second question: Do you know that there are better ways to do
> the PAL to NTSC conversion than this?

Is that a rhetorical question, the answer is yes, and you aren't
going to tell us what they are?
Related resources
Anonymous
March 30, 2005 1:31:45 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

On Tue, 29 Mar 2005 11:12:06 -0800, "Richard Crowley"
<richard.7.crowley@intel.com> wrote:

>"Neil Nadelman" wrote ...
>> Second question: Do you know that there are better ways to do
>> the PAL to NTSC conversion than this?
>
>Is that a rhetorical question, the answer is yes, and you aren't
>going to tell us what they are?

Well, you can avoid the inevitable video blurring of
reencoding from PAL to NTSC by just resizing the video to 720x480 and
slowing it down to 24 fps and adding the pulldown flag to the new
MPEG. This really only works for stuff that originates in film,
though. Interlaced video is a helluva lot harder to deal with.

We seem to get this question really often around here.

-----------------------------------------------------
Neil Nadelman arvy@navzr-genafyngbe.pbz (ROT13)
-----------------------------------------------------
I have no fears in life,
for I have already survived Theta-G!
Anonymous
March 30, 2005 1:54:38 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Neil Nadelman wrote:

> Well, you can avoid the inevitable video blurring of
> reencoding from PAL to NTSC by just resizing the video to 720x480 and
> slowing it down to 24 fps and adding the pulldown flag to the new
> MPEG. This really only works for stuff that originates in film,
> though. Interlaced video is a helluva lot harder to deal with.

This approach works for me when I de-interlace the video first.

Karl

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Anonymous
March 30, 2005 10:09:06 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

On Tue, 29 Mar 2005 21:54:38 -0500, Karl Waclawek <karl@waclawek.net>
wrote:

>Neil Nadelman wrote:
>
>> Well, you can avoid the inevitable video blurring of
>> reencoding from PAL to NTSC by just resizing the video to 720x480 and
>> slowing it down to 24 fps and adding the pulldown flag to the new
>> MPEG. This really only works for stuff that originates in film,
>> though. Interlaced video is a helluva lot harder to deal with.
>
>This approach works for me when I de-interlace the video first.

True, but then you lose the proper interlace motion of the
original video. Plus, the deinterlaced video then looks sort of like
film.
-----------------------------------------------------
Neil Nadelman arvy@navzr-genafyngbe.pbz (ROT13)
-----------------------------------------------------
I have no fears in life,
for I have already survived Theta-G!
Anonymous
March 30, 2005 11:26:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Neil Nadelman wrote:
> On Tue, 29 Mar 2005 21:54:38 -0500, Karl Waclawek <karl@waclawek.net>
> wrote:
>
>
>>Neil Nadelman wrote:
>>
>>
>>> Well, you can avoid the inevitable video blurring of
>>>reencoding from PAL to NTSC by just resizing the video to 720x480 and
>>>slowing it down to 24 fps and adding the pulldown flag to the new
>>>MPEG. This really only works for stuff that originates in film,
>>>though. Interlaced video is a helluva lot harder to deal with.
>>
>>This approach works for me when I de-interlace the video first.
>
>
> True, but then you lose the proper interlace motion of the
> original video. Plus, the deinterlaced video then looks sort of like
> film.

You are probably right, I just don't notice it.

Karl

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