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Making The PC-to-Mac Transition: Practical Advice Sought

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Anonymous
April 1, 2005 6:10:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Hello all. I'm a one-man video production company who's turned out
various documentary projects. I've seen two of my projects distributed
and I've generally done the vast majority of the entire work on these
projects. I've shot all the video, edited the footage and authored the
DVD's. I average a year and a half on each project.

But the projects are expensive to produce and the monetary returns have
been minimal (read: my projects lose money). I've been self-financing
all my projects with a non-production job that I despise and I'm
wanting to transition my career path into the post-production world.

The one problem that I foresee in the transition is that I only have
pc-based experience and the industry as a whole is largely mac-based.
With that in mind, I'm going to soon invest in the Dual 2.5mhz G5 and
learn FCP and the mac system.

I use Adobe products extensively and I'm sure that the PC-to-Mac
Photoshop/After Effects transition will be a smooth one. I'm sure that
the Mac OS, too, is fairly intuitive. What I'm most interested in is
how to best go about the transition. I don't want to be simply a
PC-user using a Mac and trying to clumsily find the Mac way of doing my
ingrained PC-based workflow. Instead, I'd like to be Mac fluent.

Are there any resources (net-based? books?) that address my situation?
A PC-savvy person who needs to make the transition to Mac?
Anonymous
April 1, 2005 6:21:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Premiere Pro and Encore are PC-only. The others should work fine. Note,
however, that you have PC versions of the software and you have to have
Mac versions for the Mac. This means reacquiring the software.
Anonymous
April 1, 2005 7:57:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

My reasons for making the PC-to-Mac Transition isn't for the sake of my
own future projects. If that were the case, I'd remain happily a PC
user. My reason is that I want a job in the industry. Here in LA, most
(if not all) post-production work is Mac-based.



C.J.Patten wrote:
> As always, these are my OPINIONS.
> Take 'em or leave 'em but arguing ain't gonna change 'em.
>
> <rant mode on>
>
> Do you feel a Mac is going to make you MORE profitable than a
WindowsXP
> based environment?
>
> I switched FROM Mac TO Windows XP workstations about 2 years ago
after about
> a dozen Macs ranging from a IIvx to Quadra, PowerMac 7600 and several

> Powerbooks, G3's, G4's etc.
>
> Mac served me for over a decade and did the job well - everything
from
> photo-retouching, illustration, layout and NLE. (Premiere
"one-point-oh"
> anyone?)
>
> The MacOS had an edge with Win98 - it's gone now against WinXP.
>
> Mac hardware will cost you more dollars than a comparably equipped
PC. An
> hour of DV25 is going to take 11GB on either platform regardless.
You're
> still going to have to remember what obscure folder you saved that
file in
> and your final product will look identical unless you slap a "Made
with Mac"
> logo on it. (don't - it's asinine)
>
> With Premiere Pro and Encore DVD, Adobe didn't feel they'd have a
reasonable
> ROI competing with Apple's own Final Cut Pro and DVD Studio Pro so
they
> aren't developing on the Mac platform.
>
> I doubt the MacOS will EVER lose Photoshop or Illustrator. If that
rumour
> got around, Apple would step in and pony up the cash to keep
development
> going because they know the Mac would die in the absence of those two

> workhorses.
>
> *********
>
> If you want a bit of my background and specifically my
work-environment
> computer-history: http://www.ncf.ca/~af895/links/PC_history.html
>
> At the end, you'll note a comparison I did between different notebook

> computers. A LESSER equipped Powerbook would have been over $1500
more than
> the HP Pavillion 17inch notebook I bought. You'll find that kind of
delta
> carries over into the desktop Macs as well.
>
> Bottom line: I was NOT going to be "$1500 more productive" on that
Mac
> laptop.
>
> *********
>
> Someone else here mentioned their facility uses PC's but they're
picking up
> a Mac-Mini so they can say they have it on the off-chance a client
comes
> along and demands they be able to use their Final Cut Pro project
files.
>
> If you're honestly getting a lot of client demand for that type of
service,
> stick a MacMini on one end of a KVM switch so you can share a
keyboard,
> mouse and monitor with a production workstation - IF you feel you're
losing
> business because you don't have a Mac.
>
> For me, I don't stress about it. If someone has a problem with my
using X,
> I'll tactfully remind them it's not the tool, it's how you swing it.
>
> <rant mode off>
>
> Use whatever you're comfortable with but DON'T for a second think you
can't
> do something on one platform that you can do on the other.
>
> No question Apple makes *the most elegant* hardware on the market but
style,
> like upgrading from your Honda Accord to a BMW, comes at a price.
Apple
> squandered it's lead in the OS market while dealing with legacy
corporate
> culture and management issues throughout the 1990's. Windows just
ain't that
> bad anymore.
>
> If you got this far, thanks for listening and I hope it helps.
>
> C.
>
>
>
> "James G" <MisterJamesGovan@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:1112393457.006401.322300@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
> > Hello all. I'm a one-man video production company who's turned out
> > various documentary projects. I've seen two of my projects
distributed
> > and I've generally done the vast majority of the entire work on
these
> > projects. I've shot all the video, edited the footage and authored
the
> > DVD's. I average a year and a half on each project.
> >
> > But the projects are expensive to produce and the monetary returns
have
> > been minimal (read: my projects lose money). I've been
self-financing
> > all my projects with a non-production job that I despise and I'm
> > wanting to transition my career path into the post-production
world.
> >
> > The one problem that I foresee in the transition is that I only
have
> > pc-based experience and the industry as a whole is largely
mac-based.
> > With that in mind, I'm going to soon invest in the Dual 2.5mhz G5
and
> > learn FCP and the mac system.
> >
> > I use Adobe products extensively and I'm sure that the PC-to-Mac
> > Photoshop/After Effects transition will be a smooth one. I'm sure
that
> > the Mac OS, too, is fairly intuitive. What I'm most interested in
is
> > how to best go about the transition. I don't want to be simply a
> > PC-user using a Mac and trying to clumsily find the Mac way of
doing my
> > ingrained PC-based workflow. Instead, I'd like to be Mac fluent.
> >
> > Are there any resources (net-based? books?) that address my
situation?
> > A PC-savvy person who needs to make the transition to Mac?
> >
Anonymous
April 1, 2005 9:56:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

As always, these are my OPINIONS.
Take 'em or leave 'em but arguing ain't gonna change 'em.

<rant mode on>

Do you feel a Mac is going to make you MORE profitable than a WindowsXP
based environment?

I switched FROM Mac TO Windows XP workstations about 2 years ago after about
a dozen Macs ranging from a IIvx to Quadra, PowerMac 7600 and several
Powerbooks, G3's, G4's etc.

Mac served me for over a decade and did the job well - everything from
photo-retouching, illustration, layout and NLE. (Premiere "one-point-oh"
anyone?)

The MacOS had an edge with Win98 - it's gone now against WinXP.

Mac hardware will cost you more dollars than a comparably equipped PC. An
hour of DV25 is going to take 11GB on either platform regardless. You're
still going to have to remember what obscure folder you saved that file in
and your final product will look identical unless you slap a "Made with Mac"
logo on it. (don't - it's asinine)

With Premiere Pro and Encore DVD, Adobe didn't feel they'd have a reasonable
ROI competing with Apple's own Final Cut Pro and DVD Studio Pro so they
aren't developing on the Mac platform.

I doubt the MacOS will EVER lose Photoshop or Illustrator. If that rumour
got around, Apple would step in and pony up the cash to keep development
going because they know the Mac would die in the absence of those two
workhorses.

*********

If you want a bit of my background and specifically my work-environment
computer-history: http://www.ncf.ca/~af895/links/PC_history.html

At the end, you'll note a comparison I did between different notebook
computers. A LESSER equipped Powerbook would have been over $1500 more than
the HP Pavillion 17inch notebook I bought. You'll find that kind of delta
carries over into the desktop Macs as well.

Bottom line: I was NOT going to be "$1500 more productive" on that Mac
laptop.

*********

Someone else here mentioned their facility uses PC's but they're picking up
a Mac-Mini so they can say they have it on the off-chance a client comes
along and demands they be able to use their Final Cut Pro project files.

If you're honestly getting a lot of client demand for that type of service,
stick a MacMini on one end of a KVM switch so you can share a keyboard,
mouse and monitor with a production workstation - IF you feel you're losing
business because you don't have a Mac.

For me, I don't stress about it. If someone has a problem with my using X,
I'll tactfully remind them it's not the tool, it's how you swing it.

<rant mode off>

Use whatever you're comfortable with but DON'T for a second think you can't
do something on one platform that you can do on the other.

No question Apple makes *the most elegant* hardware on the market but style,
like upgrading from your Honda Accord to a BMW, comes at a price. Apple
squandered it's lead in the OS market while dealing with legacy corporate
culture and management issues throughout the 1990's. Windows just ain't that
bad anymore.

If you got this far, thanks for listening and I hope it helps.

C.



"James G" <MisterJamesGovan@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1112393457.006401.322300@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
> Hello all. I'm a one-man video production company who's turned out
> various documentary projects. I've seen two of my projects distributed
> and I've generally done the vast majority of the entire work on these
> projects. I've shot all the video, edited the footage and authored the
> DVD's. I average a year and a half on each project.
>
> But the projects are expensive to produce and the monetary returns have
> been minimal (read: my projects lose money). I've been self-financing
> all my projects with a non-production job that I despise and I'm
> wanting to transition my career path into the post-production world.
>
> The one problem that I foresee in the transition is that I only have
> pc-based experience and the industry as a whole is largely mac-based.
> With that in mind, I'm going to soon invest in the Dual 2.5mhz G5 and
> learn FCP and the mac system.
>
> I use Adobe products extensively and I'm sure that the PC-to-Mac
> Photoshop/After Effects transition will be a smooth one. I'm sure that
> the Mac OS, too, is fairly intuitive. What I'm most interested in is
> how to best go about the transition. I don't want to be simply a
> PC-user using a Mac and trying to clumsily find the Mac way of doing my
> ingrained PC-based workflow. Instead, I'd like to be Mac fluent.
>
> Are there any resources (net-based? books?) that address my situation?
> A PC-savvy person who needs to make the transition to Mac?
>
Anonymous
April 1, 2005 11:21:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

On 1 Apr 2005 15:57:57 -0800, "James G" <MisterJamesGovan@gmail.com>
wrote:

>My reasons for making the PC-to-Mac Transition isn't for the sake of my
>own future projects. If that were the case, I'd remain happily a PC
>user. My reason is that I want a job in the industry. Here in LA, most
>(if not all) post-production work is Mac-based.

If you are looking for a job in the LA entertainment industry, you
ought to go Mac and learn Final Cut Pro, and/or Avid. Otherwise for
someone like myself who does all my own work for myself and
individually for other clients who don't care how I get the job done,
you can't go wrong with sticking with the PC platform (much cheaper
hardware and lots of software) and using the newest version of Adobe
Premiere Pro.
April 2, 2005 2:15:56 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

I am also thinking about switching from PC to Mac, but I want to be sure I
can use my PC programs like adobe Premiere, After Effects, Illustrator,
Encore, and others on the PAC without any problems, does anyone know if this
can be done?

"James G" <MisterJamesGovan@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1112393457.006401.322300@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
> Hello all. I'm a one-man video production company who's turned out
> various documentary projects. I've seen two of my projects distributed
> and I've generally done the vast majority of the entire work on these
> projects. I've shot all the video, edited the footage and authored the
> DVD's. I average a year and a half on each project.
>
> But the projects are expensive to produce and the monetary returns have
> been minimal (read: my projects lose money). I've been self-financing
> all my projects with a non-production job that I despise and I'm
> wanting to transition my career path into the post-production world.
>
> The one problem that I foresee in the transition is that I only have
> pc-based experience and the industry as a whole is largely mac-based.
> With that in mind, I'm going to soon invest in the Dual 2.5mhz G5 and
> learn FCP and the mac system.
>
> I use Adobe products extensively and I'm sure that the PC-to-Mac
> Photoshop/After Effects transition will be a smooth one. I'm sure that
> the Mac OS, too, is fairly intuitive. What I'm most interested in is
> how to best go about the transition. I don't want to be simply a
> PC-user using a Mac and trying to clumsily find the Mac way of doing my
> ingrained PC-based workflow. Instead, I'd like to be Mac fluent.
>
> Are there any resources (net-based? books?) that address my situation?
> A PC-savvy person who needs to make the transition to Mac?
>
April 2, 2005 4:30:59 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

James G wrote:
> My reasons for making the PC-to-Mac Transition isn't for the sake of my
> own future projects. If that were the case, I'd remain happily a PC
> user. My reason is that I want a job in the industry. Here in LA, most
> (if not all) post-production work is Mac-based.
>
>
>
> C.J.Patten wrote:
>
>>As always, these are my OPINIONS.
>>Take 'em or leave 'em but arguing ain't gonna change 'em.
>>
>><rant mode on>
>>
>>Do you feel a Mac is going to make you MORE profitable than a
>
> WindowsXP
>
>>based environment?
>>
>>I switched FROM Mac TO Windows XP workstations about 2 years ago
>
> after about
>
>>a dozen Macs ranging from a IIvx to Quadra, PowerMac 7600 and several
>
>
>>Powerbooks, G3's, G4's etc.
>>
>>Mac served me for over a decade and did the job well - everything
>
> from
>
>>photo-retouching, illustration, layout and NLE. (Premiere
>
> "one-point-oh"
>
>>anyone?)
>>
>>The MacOS had an edge with Win98 - it's gone now against WinXP.
>>
>>Mac hardware will cost you more dollars than a comparably equipped
>
> PC. An
>
>>hour of DV25 is going to take 11GB on either platform regardless.
>
> You're
>
>>still going to have to remember what obscure folder you saved that
>
> file in
>
>>and your final product will look identical unless you slap a "Made
>
> with Mac"
>
>>logo on it. (don't - it's asinine)
>>
>>With Premiere Pro and Encore DVD, Adobe didn't feel they'd have a
>
> reasonable
>
>>ROI competing with Apple's own Final Cut Pro and DVD Studio Pro so
>
> they
>
>>aren't developing on the Mac platform.
>>
>>I doubt the MacOS will EVER lose Photoshop or Illustrator. If that
>
> rumour
>
>>got around, Apple would step in and pony up the cash to keep
>
> development
>
>>going because they know the Mac would die in the absence of those two
>
>
>>workhorses.
>>
>>*********
>>
>>If you want a bit of my background and specifically my
>
> work-environment
>
>>computer-history: http://www.ncf.ca/~af895/links/PC_history.html
>>
>>At the end, you'll note a comparison I did between different notebook
>
>
>>computers. A LESSER equipped Powerbook would have been over $1500
>
> more than
>
>>the HP Pavillion 17inch notebook I bought. You'll find that kind of
>
> delta
>
>>carries over into the desktop Macs as well.
>>
>>Bottom line: I was NOT going to be "$1500 more productive" on that
>
> Mac
>
>>laptop.
>>
>>*********
>>
>>Someone else here mentioned their facility uses PC's but they're
>
> picking up
>
>>a Mac-Mini so they can say they have it on the off-chance a client
>
> comes
>
>>along and demands they be able to use their Final Cut Pro project
>
> files.
>
>>If you're honestly getting a lot of client demand for that type of
>
> service,
>
>>stick a MacMini on one end of a KVM switch so you can share a
>
> keyboard,
>
>>mouse and monitor with a production workstation - IF you feel you're
>
> losing
>
>>business because you don't have a Mac.
>>
>>For me, I don't stress about it. If someone has a problem with my
>
> using X,
>
>>I'll tactfully remind them it's not the tool, it's how you swing it.
>>
>><rant mode off>
>>
>>Use whatever you're comfortable with but DON'T for a second think you
>
> can't
>
>>do something on one platform that you can do on the other.
>>
>>No question Apple makes *the most elegant* hardware on the market but
>
> style,
>
>>like upgrading from your Honda Accord to a BMW, comes at a price.
>
> Apple
>
>>squandered it's lead in the OS market while dealing with legacy
>
> corporate
>
>>culture and management issues throughout the 1990's. Windows just
>
> ain't that
>
>>bad anymore.
>>
>>If you got this far, thanks for listening and I hope it helps.
>>
>>C.
>>
>>
>>
>>"James G" <MisterJamesGovan@gmail.com> wrote in message
>>news:1112393457.006401.322300@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
>>
>>>Hello all. I'm a one-man video production company who's turned out
>>>various documentary projects. I've seen two of my projects
>
> distributed
>
>>>and I've generally done the vast majority of the entire work on
>
> these
>
>>>projects. I've shot all the video, edited the footage and authored
>
> the
>
>>>DVD's. I average a year and a half on each project.
>>>
>>>But the projects are expensive to produce and the monetary returns
>
> have
>
>>>been minimal (read: my projects lose money). I've been
>
> self-financing
>
>>>all my projects with a non-production job that I despise and I'm
>>>wanting to transition my career path into the post-production
>
> world.
>
>>>The one problem that I foresee in the transition is that I only
>
> have
>
>>>pc-based experience and the industry as a whole is largely
>
> mac-based.
>
>>>With that in mind, I'm going to soon invest in the Dual 2.5mhz G5
>
> and
>
>>>learn FCP and the mac system.
>>>
>>>I use Adobe products extensively and I'm sure that the PC-to-Mac
>>>Photoshop/After Effects transition will be a smooth one. I'm sure
>
> that
>
>>>the Mac OS, too, is fairly intuitive. What I'm most interested in
>
> is
>
>>>how to best go about the transition. I don't want to be simply a
>>>PC-user using a Mac and trying to clumsily find the Mac way of
>
> doing my
>
>>>ingrained PC-based workflow. Instead, I'd like to be Mac fluent.
>>>
>>>Are there any resources (net-based? books?) that address my
>
> situation?
>
>>>A PC-savvy person who needs to make the transition to Mac?


There is nothing special to learn for OSX. Just get some books about the
applications that you'll use - FCP mainly.
April 2, 2005 5:25:26 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

James G wrote:
> My reasons for making the PC-to-Mac Transition isn't for the sake of my
> own future projects. If that were the case, I'd remain happily a PC
> user. My reason is that I want a job in the industry. Here in LA, most
> (if not all) post-production work is Mac-based.
>
>
>
> C.J.Patten wrote:
>> As always, these are my OPINIONS.
>> Take 'em or leave 'em but arguing ain't gonna change 'em.
>>
>> <rant mode on>
>>
>> Do you feel a Mac is going to make you MORE profitable than a WindowsXP
>> based environment?
>>
>> I switched FROM Mac TO Windows XP workstations about 2 years ago after about
>> a dozen Macs ranging from a IIvx to Quadra, PowerMac 7600 and several
>
>> Powerbooks, G3's, G4's etc.
>>
>> Mac served me for over a decade and did the job well - everything from
>> photo-retouching, illustration, layout and NLE. (Premiere "one-point-oh"
>> anyone?)
>>
>> The MacOS had an edge with Win98 - it's gone now against WinXP.
>>
>> Mac hardware will cost you more dollars than a comparably equipped PC. An
>> hour of DV25 is going to take 11GB on either platform regardless. You're
>> still going to have to remember what obscure folder you saved that file in
>> and your final product will look identical unless you slap a "Made with Mac"
>> logo on it. (don't - it's asinine)
>>
>> With Premiere Pro and Encore DVD, Adobe didn't feel they'd have a reasonable
>> ROI competing with Apple's own Final Cut Pro and DVD Studio Pro so they
>> aren't developing on the Mac platform.
>>
>> I doubt the MacOS will EVER lose Photoshop or Illustrator. If that rumour
>> got around, Apple would step in and pony up the cash to keep development
>> going because they know the Mac would die in the absence of those two
>
>> workhorses.
>>
>> *********
>>
>> If you want a bit of my background and specifically my work-environment
>> computer-history: http://www.ncf.ca/~af895/links/PC_history.html
>>
>> At the end, you'll note a comparison I did between different notebook
>
>> computers. A LESSER equipped Powerbook would have been over $1500 more than
>> the HP Pavillion 17inch notebook I bought. You'll find that kind of delta
>> carries over into the desktop Macs as well.
>>
>> Bottom line: I was NOT going to be "$1500 more productive" on that Mac
>> laptop.
>>
>> *********
>>
>> Someone else here mentioned their facility uses PC's but they're picking up
>> a Mac-Mini so they can say they have it on the off-chance a client comes
>> along and demands they be able to use their Final Cut Pro project files.
>>
>> If you're honestly getting a lot of client demand for that type of service,
>> stick a MacMini on one end of a KVM switch so you can share a keyboard,
>> mouse and monitor with a production workstation - IF you feel you're losing
>> business because you don't have a Mac.
>>
>> For me, I don't stress about it. If someone has a problem with my using X,
>> I'll tactfully remind them it's not the tool, it's how you swing it.
>>
>> <rant mode off>
>>
>> Use whatever you're comfortable with but DON'T for a second think you can't
>> do something on one platform that you can do on the other.
>>
>> No question Apple makes *the most elegant* hardware on the market but style,
>> like upgrading from your Honda Accord to a BMW, comes at a price. Apple
>> squandered it's lead in the OS market while dealing with legacy corporate
>> culture and management issues throughout the 1990's. Windows just ain't that
>> bad anymore.
>>
>> If you got this far, thanks for listening and I hope it helps.
>>
>> C.
>>
>>
>>
>> "James G" <MisterJamesGovan@gmail.com> wrote in message
>> news:1112393457.006401.322300@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
>>> Hello all. I'm a one-man video production company who's turned out
>>> various documentary projects. I've seen two of my projects distributed
>>> and I've generally done the vast majority of the entire work on these
>>> projects. I've shot all the video, edited the footage and authored the
>>> DVD's. I average a year and a half on each project.
>>>
>>> But the projects are expensive to produce and the monetary returns have
>>> been minimal (read: my projects lose money). I've been self-financing
>>> all my projects with a non-production job that I despise and I'm
>>> wanting to transition my career path into the post-production world.
>>>
>>> The one problem that I foresee in the transition is that I only have
>>> pc-based experience and the industry as a whole is largely mac-based.
>>> With that in mind, I'm going to soon invest in the Dual 2.5mhz G5 and
>>> learn FCP and the mac system.
>>>
>>> I use Adobe products extensively and I'm sure that the PC-to-Mac
>>> Photoshop/After Effects transition will be a smooth one. I'm sure that
>>> the Mac OS, too, is fairly intuitive. What I'm most interested in is
>>> how to best go about the transition. I don't want to be simply a
>>> PC-user using a Mac and trying to clumsily find the Mac way of doing my
>>> ingrained PC-based workflow. Instead, I'd like to be Mac fluent.
>>>
>>> Are there any resources (net-based? books?) that address my situation?
>>> A PC-savvy person who needs to make the transition to Mac?

Avid is shipping on PC platforms these days. We have 6 Avids all PC based. 4 HPs
and 2 no-name computers. Our past Avids were IBM based. Way back we had some Mac
based Avids. Photoshop works just fine on a PC. Out of maybe 35 or so computers
we have 1 Mac and that is for DVD authoring. We are not Hollywood but we are a
large Midwest production house.
You said "Here in LA, most (if not all) post-production work is Mac-based"
What exactly do you mean by Mac-based? I'm not an anti-Mac person but PCs are
being used a lot in the post production world for more than scheduling.
Anonymous
April 2, 2005 7:49:06 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

The only reason you think you need a mac is because you do not have one. Our
lab has both and the mac is far more problematic. Especially with the latest
incarnations of FCP. It is truly a dog system. You'll hate it. OSX is an
unfinished, clumsy version of Linux and will never , ever be done as far as
I am concerned.

We run Premiere Pro for 99% of our work now and over the last several months
have not had a single catastrophic event. Whereas FCP gave us a few every
single day. I URGE you to rethink .. go to all of the forums that are for
FCP and lurk a while. I think you will change your mind.

If the market in you area is all mac as you say, I truly feel sorry for ya..


"James G" <MisterJamesGovan@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1112393457.006401.322300@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
> Hello all. I'm a one-man video production company who's turned out
> various documentary projects. I've seen two of my projects distributed
> and I've generally done the vast majority of the entire work on these
> projects. I've shot all the video, edited the footage and authored the
> DVD's. I average a year and a half on each project.
>
> But the projects are expensive to produce and the monetary returns have
> been minimal (read: my projects lose money). I've been self-financing
> all my projects with a non-production job that I despise and I'm
> wanting to transition my career path into the post-production world.
>
> The one problem that I foresee in the transition is that I only have
> pc-based experience and the industry as a whole is largely mac-based.
> With that in mind, I'm going to soon invest in the Dual 2.5mhz G5 and
> learn FCP and the mac system.
>
> I use Adobe products extensively and I'm sure that the PC-to-Mac
> Photoshop/After Effects transition will be a smooth one. I'm sure that
> the Mac OS, too, is fairly intuitive. What I'm most interested in is
> how to best go about the transition. I don't want to be simply a
> PC-user using a Mac and trying to clumsily find the Mac way of doing my
> ingrained PC-based workflow. Instead, I'd like to be Mac fluent.
>
> Are there any resources (net-based? books?) that address my situation?
> A PC-savvy person who needs to make the transition to Mac?
>
Anonymous
April 2, 2005 7:49:07 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"nap" wrote ...
> The only reason you think you need a mac is because you do not have
> one. Our lab has both and the mac is far more problematic. Especially
> with the latest incarnations of FCP. It is truly a dog system.
> You'll hate it. OSX is an unfinished, clumsy version of Linux and will
> never , ever be done as far as I am concerned.
>
> We run Premiere Pro for 99% of our work now and over the last several
> months have not had a single catastrophic event. Whereas FCP gave us a
> few every single day. I URGE you to rethink .. go to all of the forums
> that are for FCP and lurk a while. I think you will change your mind.
>
> If the market in you area is all mac as you say, I truly feel sorry
> for ya..

OTOH, being the only PC house in a Mac territory might be a
competitive advantage! :-)
I think the OP's reasoning is full of holes and fatally flawed.
Anonymous
April 2, 2005 7:52:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

> There is nothing special to learn for OSX. Just get some books about the
> applications that you'll use - FCP mainly.

Yeah... until you have a probpem, go to the forums and they all say
REINSTALL the OS or .. did you fix permissionas on all the files?

The most common solution offered for this dog of a system is to reinstall
the OS. Now when I see that I KNOW that no one knows what the hell is going
on.
Anonymous
April 2, 2005 11:33:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

sorry I meant clumsy version of UNIX (BSD)
"nap" <gospam@yourself.com> wrote in message
news:S9z3e.6137$FN4.1528@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com...
> The only reason you think you need a mac is because you do not have one.
> Our lab has both and the mac is far more problematic. Especially with the
> latest incarnations of FCP. It is truly a dog system. You'll hate it.
> OSX is an unfinished, clumsy version of Linux and will never , ever be
> done as far as I am concerned.
>
> We run Premiere Pro for 99% of our work now and over the last several
> months have not had a single catastrophic event. Whereas FCP gave us a few
> every single day. I URGE you to rethink .. go to all of the forums that
> are for FCP and lurk a while. I think you will change your mind.
>
> If the market in you area is all mac as you say, I truly feel sorry for
> ya..
>
>
> "James G" <MisterJamesGovan@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:1112393457.006401.322300@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
>> Hello all. I'm a one-man video production company who's turned out
>> various documentary projects. I've seen two of my projects distributed
>> and I've generally done the vast majority of the entire work on these
>> projects. I've shot all the video, edited the footage and authored the
>> DVD's. I average a year and a half on each project.
>>
>> But the projects are expensive to produce and the monetary returns have
>> been minimal (read: my projects lose money). I've been self-financing
>> all my projects with a non-production job that I despise and I'm
>> wanting to transition my career path into the post-production world.
>>
>> The one problem that I foresee in the transition is that I only have
>> pc-based experience and the industry as a whole is largely mac-based.
>> With that in mind, I'm going to soon invest in the Dual 2.5mhz G5 and
>> learn FCP and the mac system.
>>
>> I use Adobe products extensively and I'm sure that the PC-to-Mac
>> Photoshop/After Effects transition will be a smooth one. I'm sure that
>> the Mac OS, too, is fairly intuitive. What I'm most interested in is
>> how to best go about the transition. I don't want to be simply a
>> PC-user using a Mac and trying to clumsily find the Mac way of doing my
>> ingrained PC-based workflow. Instead, I'd like to be Mac fluent.
>>
>> Are there any resources (net-based? books?) that address my situation?
>> A PC-savvy person who needs to make the transition to Mac?
>>
>
>
Anonymous
April 3, 2005 3:58:39 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

I'm with Jim Gunn who said:

"If you are looking for a job in the LA entertainment industry, you
ought to go Mac and learn Final Cut Pro, and/or Avid. Otherwise for
someone like myself who does all my own work for myself and
individually for other clients who don't care how I get the job done,
you can't go wrong with sticking with the PC platform (much cheaper
hardware and lots of software) and using the newest version of Adobe
Premiere Pro."

using a Mac vs a PC is a matter of preference. Although it is smart to learn
all NLE systems out there and not limit yourself. IMO Mac is more stable
when it comes to editing video- it also allows one to be more creative with
the software options they provide.

To answer your question:

There are dozens of links and info on the web to assist you with the
transition. Googlize Mac vs PC, check amazon.com for books, find your local
FCP user group....flapping in the wind during the transition shouldn't
happen with dozens of resources on the web.


--
Brian Alves

Listen to the new podcast
for DV creators- The DV Show!
http://www.thedvshow.com




James G <MisterJamesGovan@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1112393457.006401.322300@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
> Hello all. I'm a one-man video production company who's turned out
> various documentary projects. I've seen two of my projects distributed
> and I've generally done the vast majority of the entire work on these
> projects. I've shot all the video, edited the footage and authored the
> DVD's. I average a year and a half on each project.
>
> But the projects are expensive to produce and the monetary returns have
> been minimal (read: my projects lose money). I've been self-financing
> all my projects with a non-production job that I despise and I'm
> wanting to transition my career path into the post-production world.
>
> The one problem that I foresee in the transition is that I only have
> pc-based experience and the industry as a whole is largely mac-based.
> With that in mind, I'm going to soon invest in the Dual 2.5mhz G5 and
> learn FCP and the mac system.
>
> I use Adobe products extensively and I'm sure that the PC-to-Mac
> Photoshop/After Effects transition will be a smooth one. I'm sure that
> the Mac OS, too, is fairly intuitive. What I'm most interested in is
> how to best go about the transition. I don't want to be simply a
> PC-user using a Mac and trying to clumsily find the Mac way of doing my
> ingrained PC-based workflow. Instead, I'd like to be Mac fluent.
>
> Are there any resources (net-based? books?) that address my situation?
> A PC-savvy person who needs to make the transition to Mac?
>
Anonymous
April 3, 2005 8:05:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"The DV Show" <brian@thedvshow.com> wrote in message
news:TpK3e.68$vZ2.64@fe04.lga...
> using a Mac vs a PC is a matter of preference. Although it is smart to
> learn
> all NLE systems out there and not limit yourself. IMO Mac is more stable
> when it comes to editing video- it also allows one to be more creative
> with
> the software options they provide.
>


I wish that were true. In my experience and many of the companites I work
with., FCP , especially the last incarnation, has been the least stable of
the lot. Especially during OS upgrades.
Anonymous
April 4, 2005 8:13:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"The DV Show" <brian@thedvshow.com> wrote in message
news:TpK3e.68$vZ2.64@fe04.lga...
> I'm with Jim Gunn who said:
>
>> using a Mac vs a PC is a matter of preference. Although it is smart to
>> learn
> all NLE systems out there and not limit yourself. IMO Mac is more stable
> when it comes to editing video- it also allows one to be more creative
> with
> the software options they provide.
>

Do you actually work in a production environment? I'm guessing not becasue
you wouldn't make such a statement if you did. XP and for that matter Win
2000 based Avid systems are far more stable than even the newest versions of
Final Cut. It's hard to be creative while you're reloading OSX once a week.
Anonymous
April 4, 2005 11:33:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

On Mon, 04 Apr 2005 16:13:21 GMT, "Digirati" <s@prsigy.com> wrote in
rec.video.desktop:

>It's hard to be creative while you're reloading OSX once a week.

You're doing something seriously wrong if you have to reload OSX once
a week.
I've installed 10.2.x on several machines nearly two years ago and
they're solid as a rock. Running FCP without much[1] problems. They're
still going strong.
I've installed 10.3 on another machine about a year[2] ago. No
troubles at all.

Don't get me started on 10.1 though. Not... terribly bad but about as
stable as 9.x[3] (ie could be better).

Great, solid production environment as far as I'm concerned.

[1] no more stable or unstable as any other app I've used: Premiere
6.0 and 6.5, Cakewalk PA 9, Sonar 2 and 3, Sony Vegas[4], Dreamweaver,
Flash, After Effects, and so on. Never used Avid, though.
[2]not sure about the date. About two months after it was released.
[3]In my experience. Our OS 9 machines are used by students. 'Nuff
said.
[3]The windows apps were used on Win2000 and WinXP.
--

dwaes /at hetnet /dot nl

Going too far
WE don't go too far!
None of us will go too far...
Maybe sometimes we WENT too far
But now WE WON'T!
Because we're real nice guys!
Anonymous
April 4, 2005 11:33:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"tetraplan" <dwaes@spamdeath.hell> wrote in message
news:bmt2511rspbv2a3qbfgt9fmfefookq3c6p@4ax.com...
> On Mon, 04 Apr 2005 16:13:21 GMT, "Digirati" <s@prsigy.com> wrote in
> rec.video.desktop:
>
>>It's hard to be creative while you're reloading OSX once a week.
>
> You're doing something seriously wrong if you have to reload OSX once
> a week.
> I've installed 10.2.x on several machines nearly two years ago and
> they're solid as a rock. Running FCP without much[1] problems. They're
> still going strong.
> I've installed 10.3 on another machine about a year[2] ago. No
> troubles at all.
>
> Don't get me started on 10.1 though. Not... terribly bad but about as
> stable as 9.x[3] (ie could be better).
>
> Great, solid production environment as far as I'm concerned.
>
> [1] no more stable or unstable as any other app I've used: Premiere
> 6.0 and 6.5, Cakewalk PA 9, Sonar 2 and 3, Sony Vegas[4], Dreamweaver,
> Flash, After Effects, and so on. Never used Avid, though.

Those are all pretty old apps. I run Premiere Pro here, without anywhere
near the problems I have had with FCP.



> [2]not sure about the date. About two months after it was released.

Later incarnations of OSX beyond 10.3 caused tsunamis in FCP


> [3]In my experience. Our OS 9 machines are used by students. 'Nuff
> said.
> [3]The windows apps were used on Win2000 and WinXP.
> --
>
> dwaes /at hetnet /dot nl
>
> Going too far
> WE don't go too far!
> None of us will go too far...
> Maybe sometimes we WENT too far
> But now WE WON'T!
> Because we're real nice guys!
Anonymous
April 4, 2005 11:33:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

1. Mac OS X - The missing manual. Pick it up for reference and to learn
about OS X - it is different from a PC.
2. Go attend the free Apple Store training classes. They've got a few
in Los Angeles, and always a help to ease over.
3. VirtualPC - you can run this on your Mac in case you need to have
access to whatever PC on your Mac. Saves time vs. going to a PC, and
can come in handy during the transition.
4. www.apple.com - believe they had a few PC to Mac transition guides
for beginners.

---

After that, once familar with the basics, you'll basically be learning
FCP/etc., and will need various books/classes to get up to speed fast on
those programs. Up to you as to what you'll need. OS X will otherwise
be seemless at that point, and luckily, mostly stable.

---

Finally, believe Apple.com has that one article on how the guys cut Cold
Mountain on Macs completely, and it may provide helpful insight into
your work on a Mac.
Anonymous
April 5, 2005 12:35:39 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

On Mon, 04 Apr 2005 18:15:57 GMT, "nap" <gospam@yourself.com> wrote in
rec.video.desktop:

>> [1] no more stable or unstable as any other app I've used: Premiere
>> 6.0 and 6.5, Cakewalk PA 9, Sonar 2 and 3, Sony Vegas[4], Dreamweaver,
>> Flash, After Effects, and so on. Never used Avid, though.
>
>Those are all pretty old apps. I run Premiere Pro here, without anywhere
>near the problems I have had with FCP.

I have no experience with Premiere Pro.
Sonar 3 is pretty current (4 is what, 5 months old?).
So are the Macromedia 2004MX-apps.
Anyway, I haven't seen any of the stability-related problems with FCP
3 or 4 that I read about here. The only thing that seems to be the
same for every user is the "preparing video..." issue, which seems to
be memory related: multiple open sequences, thumbnails/waveforms
enabled, &c.

I'd say it's varying mileage stuff.

>> [2]not sure about the date. About two months after it was released.
>
>Later incarnations of OSX beyond 10.3 caused tsunamis in FCP

Running 10.3.8 here.
Again, I can only speak from my own experience and that of co-workers
and volunteers running a similar setup.

--

dwaes /at hetnet /dot nl

Going too far
WE don't go too far!
None of us will go too far...
Maybe sometimes we WENT too far
But now WE WON'T!
Because we're real nice guys!
Anonymous
April 5, 2005 3:59:35 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"tetraplan" <dwaes@spamdeath.hell> wrote in message
news:8n13515vfdtejc9j48oficc60e031lurbs@4ax.com...
> On Mon, 04 Apr 2005 18:15:57 GMT, "nap" <gospam@yourself.com> wrote in
> rec.video.desktop:
>
>>> [1] no more stable or unstable as any other app I've used: Premiere
>>> 6.0 and 6.5, Cakewalk PA 9, Sonar 2 and 3, Sony Vegas[4], Dreamweaver,
>>> Flash, After Effects, and so on. Never used Avid, though.
>>
>>Those are all pretty old apps. I run Premiere Pro here, without anywhere
>>near the problems I have had with FCP.
>
> I have no experience with Premiere Pro.
> Sonar 3 is pretty current (4 is what, 5 months old?).
> So are the Macromedia 2004MX-apps.
> Anyway, I haven't seen any of the stability-related problems with FCP
> 3 or 4 that I read about here. The only thing that seems to be the
> same for every user is the "preparing video..." issue, which seems to
> be memory related: multiple open sequences, thumbnails/waveforms
> enabled, &c.


Man.. ain't that the truth. I got so sick of seeing that popup that at one
point.. I think I was looking at the PVFD dialog more than I was working.
That's when I stopped using FCP.
>
> I'd say it's varying mileage stuff.
>
>>> [2]not sure about the date. About two months after it was released.
>>
>>Later incarnations of OSX beyond 10.3 caused tsunamis in FCP
>
> Running 10.3.8 here.
> Again, I can only speak from my own experience and that of co-workers
> and volunteers running a similar setup.
>
> --
>
> dwaes /at hetnet /dot nl
>
> Going too far
> WE don't go too far!
> None of us will go too far...
> Maybe sometimes we WENT too far
> But now WE WON'T!
> Because we're real nice guys!
!