Premiere Elements codec: Causes HiDef Play Back to Smear

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Hi,

I have several hidef mpeg files that were extracted from a recorded
transport stream using an over-the-air card in my computer. When I
extracted them, I did not resize them at all. The Avicodec reports that
the files are 1920x1080(2.21:1), 29.97 fps, 15000Kbps. (is 2.21:1 the
pixel shape?)

I have never had an issue with the playback until I loaded Premiere
Elements.

When they play, I now get extreme smearing (really jaggies if you look
close) on fast moving areas of the video. The hand of a guitar player
is totally messed up. This occurs at any playback size and with media
player, real player, and videolan. Prior to loading Elements, I know
these 3 players had no issues with playback.

Graphedt renders the file, it builds a graph using the "MainConcept
(AdobeEncore) MPEG Video Decoder" to handle the video part of the file.

Help!

Bob
6 answers Last reply
More about premiere elements codec hidef play back smear
  1. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    On 6 Apr 2005 10:30:36 -0700, in 'rec.video.desktop',
    in article <Premiere Elements codec: Causes HiDef Play Back to Smear>,
    bobgcampbell@gmail.com wrote:

    >Hi,

    Hello Bob,

    >I have several hidef mpeg files that were extracted from a recorded
    >transport stream using an over-the-air card in my computer.

    Just curious, but was this a satellite broadcast or a terrestrial
    broadcast?

    >When I extracted them, I did not resize them at all.

    Okay.

    >The Avicodec reports that
    >the files are 1920x1080(2.21:1), 29.97 fps, 15000Kbps. (is 2.21:1 the
    >pixel shape?)

    1920 x 1080 is the frame size (width by height, in pixels) and has a
    16:9 (1.778:1) aspect ratio, although some films have been done in a
    2.21:1 aspect ratio. 29.97 is, of course, the NTSC frame rate (in
    frames per second) and 15000 kbps (15 Mbps) is the highest data rate
    usually used in MP@ML (Main Profile at Main Level) MPEG-2 encoding. I
    don't believe that 2.21:1 is all that common.

    >I have never had an issue with the playback until I loaded Premiere
    >Elements.

    That could be because the installation of Premiere Elements either a)
    replaced the MPEG-2 decoding codec that you were previously using (it
    would be helpful at this point if you knew the name of the codec that
    you were previously using so that you could determine if it's still
    installed on your system) or b) installed an additional MPEG-2
    decoding codec on your system (the "MainConcept (AdobeEncore) MPEG
    Video Decoder" which you mention below) and this new filter was
    assigned a higher merit than the old filter.

    >When they play, I now get extreme smearing (really jaggies if you look
    >close) on fast moving areas of the video. The hand of a guitar player
    >is totally messed up. This occurs at any playback size and with media
    >player, real player, and videolan. Prior to loading Elements, I know
    >these 3 players had no issues with playback.

    Just curious, but by "media player" do you mean Windows Media Player?
    Also, does the video appear to be playing back with the proper aspect
    ratio?

    >Graphedt renders the file, it builds a graph using the "MainConcept
    >(AdobeEncore) MPEG Video Decoder" to handle the video part of the file.

    What did you do exactly? Did you launch Graphedt and select the
    "Render Media File..." item on the 'File' menu and then browse to the
    file in question and select it? Note that when you do this, Graphedt
    will pick the (DirectShow) filter with the highest merit (which
    matches the GUID of the media type, subtype, and format, of course).
    IOW, it uses the "default" filter. I would suggest that you choose the
    "Insert Filters..." item on the 'Graph' menu and look to see whether
    your old MPEG-2 decoder filter is still there. It would be under the
    "DirectShow Filters" category. If it is, manually draw your own graph
    and see if it plays (renders) the file okay.

    >Help!

    I hope that I've been of some help (I'm still on my first cup of
    coffee, if that's any excuse).

    Note that if you unregister (with RegSvr32.exe) the MainConcept
    (AdobeEncore) MPEG Video Decoder then Premiere Elements may no longer
    properly handle MPEG-2 files. Also, I have to ask if you also have
    Adobe Encore installed on your system, given the name of this filter.

    Although I've never used them, there are programs out there (RadLight
    Filter Manager 1.4, for example) which will allow you to change the
    merit of a DirectShow filter. Although dangerous when you don't know
    what you're doing, this can be useful when you have multiple filters
    which can handle the same task but want a certain filter to be the
    default at some times and a different filter to be the default at
    other times, depending upon what sort of work you're doing at the
    time.

    The following page on the Microsoft Developer Network (MSDN) portion
    of the Microsoft Web site defines DirectShow filter merit values.

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/directshow/htm/merit.asp

    RadLight Filter Manager 1.4, in the form of a ZIP file
    (rlfm_bin1_4.zip - 211,895 bytes), can be directly downloaded via the
    following link.

    http://www.dvbviewer.com/forum/index.php?act=Attach&type=post&id=406

    >Bob

    --
    Frank, Independent Consultant
    New York, NY
    [Please remove 'nojunkmail.' from address to reply via e-mail.]
    Read Frank's thoughts on HDV at http://www.humanvalues.net/hdv/
  2. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    Thanks for the detailed response. I've learned a lot.

    The Encore filter came with Premiere Elemnts, I didn't install the
    separate Encore application.

    In graphedit, I right clicked on the codec, and there was a
    de-interlace setting. This makes the setting the default and not the
    mpeg plays correctly.

    I don't know if this will effect how Premiere Elements renders, I may
    need to change it back.

    I'm going to have to dig into the RegSvr32 usage and the RadLight
    filter manager. They look useful.

    My next problem is that when I render the hidef file into a DVD format
    mpeg, the audio and video anre many seconds off by the end of an hour.
    The Adobe FAQ says to go to www.videohelp.com and use another program
    to make an AVI!!!!! Imagine that, and I paid money for Elements so I
    wouldn't have to risk using spyware laden unsupported software.


    Thanks Again,

    Bob
  3. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    On 7 Apr 2005 16:34:15 -0700, in 'rec.video.desktop',
    in article <Re: Premiere Elements codec: Causes HiDef Play Back to
    Smear>,
    bobgcampbell@gmail.com wrote:

    >Thanks for the detailed response. I've learned a lot.

    That's good to hear.

    >The Encore filter came with Premiere Elemnts, I didn't install the
    >separate Encore application.

    Okay.

    >In graphedit, I right clicked on the codec, and there was a
    >de-interlace setting. This makes the setting the default and not the
    >mpeg plays correctly.

    I apologize for not immediately recognizing your problem as being
    (possibly) related to interlacing artifacts. I should have.

    >I don't know if this will effect how Premiere Elements renders, I may
    >need to change it back.

    Don't know. If worse comes to worse, and you can't find better advice
    elsewhere, you could try it both ways and compare the results.

    >I'm going to have to dig into the RegSvr32 usage and the RadLight
    >filter manager. They look useful.

    Okay, just be careful. :)

    >My next problem is that when I render the hidef file into a DVD format
    >mpeg, the audio and video anre many seconds off by the end of an hour.

    I sympathize. It's been (thankfully) many years since I've had to deal
    with audio/video synchronization issues on any video editing system
    that I've used, but they are, at least to my mind, some of the most
    irritating problems to resolve.

    The first step in resolving this might be to determine whether the
    out-of-synch condition exists in your original video file or whether
    it's being introduced (most likely by some piece of software) later on
    in your process. If the original video is okay, then you're already
    half-way to resolving the problem.

    >The Adobe FAQ says to go to www.videohelp.com and use another program
    >to make an AVI!!!!! Imagine that, and I paid money for Elements so I
    >wouldn't have to risk using spyware laden unsupported software.

    I appreciate what you're saying. Be sure to try the forums on
    adobe.com (and elsewhere) before you give up on this, though.

    Go to http://www.adobe.com/support/forums/main.html and select the
    Adobe Premiere Elements (Win) link on the left-side of the Web page.
    There might well be other users who have experienced the same problem
    and who have come up with solutions.

    >Thanks Again,

    You're quite welcome, and good luck!

    >Bob

    --
    Frank, Independent Consultant
    New York, NY
    [Please remove 'nojunkmail.' from address to reply via e-mail.]
    Read Frank's thoughts on HDV at http://www.humanvalues.net/hdv/
  4. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    Oops, Elements can't export AVI, only MPEG, QuickTime, or Windows
    Media.

    Looks like media takes a one way trip from a camcorder (AVI) to
    computer or DVD.

    Is Premiere Pro any better at importing MPEG media?

    Bob
  5. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    On 8 Apr 2005 12:18:23 -0700, in 'rec.video.desktop',
    in article <Re: Premiere Elements codec: Causes HiDef Play Back to
    Smear>,
    bobgcampbell@gmail.com wrote:

    >Oops, Elements can't export AVI, only MPEG, QuickTime, or Windows
    >Media.

    I've never used Premiere Elements (PE) -- been doing most recent work
    in Sony Vegas and Ulead MediaStudio Pro -- but even if PE doesn't
    allow "Export" in AVI format it still should have *some* ability to
    create AVI files. Maybe you should look for a "Save As" function.

    >Looks like media takes a one way trip from a camcorder (AVI) to
    >computer or DVD.

    Surely you can save an AVI file to your hard disk drive from PE? I
    know the specs suggest that you can connect a VHS VCR to your DV
    camcorder (which in turn is connected to your computer's IEEE 1394
    port) and use the camcorder's digital-to-analog "pass-through" ability
    to create VHS tapes of your finished project. This would make it seem
    likely that you could simply write to DV tape instead, right?

    >Is Premiere Pro any better at importing MPEG media?

    I'm sorry, that I don't know. I'm an old-school kind of guy who thinks
    of MPEG-2 as a transmission/distribution format and not as an
    acquisition/editing format.

    >Bob

    --
    Frank, Independent Consultant
    New York, NY
    [Please remove 'nojunkmail.' from address to reply via e-mail.]
    Read Frank's thoughts on HDV at http://www.humanvalues.net/hdv/
  6. Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

    The file save as function is for the PE project file.

    Under export, there is a greyed out export to tape, but I haven't tried
    connecting my camcorder to see if it becomes enabled. Under the file
    export menu, there is a Movie.... selection and I found AVI as a file
    type, but the sound is off the same as before (~15 sec fast in 60 min
    mpeg).

    I don't think you're any more old school than me, heck I even know the
    difference between your and you're. It's just that the media comes to
    me in mpeg.

    I tried using a few of the tools on www.videohelp.com, but they are all
    targeted at NTSC, not ATSC, frame size. There are menus for selecting
    output size, but it didn't retain my 1920x1080, everything went down to
    less that 800x600. I spent the most time with gordian knot.

    Oh well, I'll keep hunting.

    Bob
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