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VHS to DVD : How many hrs to squeeze on a disc?

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Anonymous
April 10, 2005 3:47:40 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

I want to transfer my VHS tapes to DVD. I have already captured two
hours of VHS to DV. Pinnacle Studio 9 gives me the option of squeezing
all of it onto one DVD-R. Am I going to lose quality if I do that?
Also, since I have 3-hr tapes as well, how much can I squeeze on a
DVD-R to get reasonable results?

thanks
Anonymous
April 10, 2005 8:48:44 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

<jramaley@iname.com> wrote in message
news:1113115660.279105.314930@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
>I want to transfer my VHS tapes to DVD. I have already captured two
> hours of VHS to DV. Pinnacle Studio 9 gives me the option of squeezing
> all of it onto one DVD-R. Am I going to lose quality if I do that?
> Also, since I have 3-hr tapes as well, how much can I squeeze on a
> DVD-R to get reasonable results?
>
> thanks
>

The answer is subjective, a matter of individual tastes, how
much of which visual factors do you view as negative. It's
also impacted by the fact that different programs uses different
algorithms to accomplish the same tasks, these are adjusted to
include the programmers views of various human visual
parameters used in many compression schemes.

That said, I think 3 hours is a good limit for Full D1, 720x
480 NTSC and a little over 4-5 hours as a limit for Half D1;
depending on source quality. (That's 6-7 "hours" of TV, with
the commercials and credits removed.) ( This is for DVD
Compliant MPEG VBR bitrates that will allow video of
average complexity and of the mentioned playtime to fit on
a single layer ("4.7G") DVD+-R)

The only way to see what your system, software and
sources; can provide that matches your own tastes; is to
try and try again. There is no real short cut, or final answer
for that matter. (Things keep a change'n.)

Luck;
Ken
Anonymous
April 10, 2005 1:56:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Ken Maltby wrote:
> The answer is subjective, a matter of individual tastes, how
> much of which visual factors do you view as negative. It's
> also impacted by the fact that different programs uses different
> algorithms to accomplish the same tasks, these are adjusted to
> include the programmers views of various human visual
> parameters used in many compression schemes.

I think it is highly dependent upon the hardware used to capture,
also. I extensively experimented with analog video captured
as NTSC-DV with the pass-through of my Sony camcorder.
Capturing at 720x480 and subsequently downsampling resulted
in what I believe may be inferior quality to that produced by
hardware which would initially sample the video at a different size.
Of course, the software comes into play at that point. As well,
noise is a huge factor in compressibility...

The original quest was to fit two hours of VHS onto a 4.7GB DVDR
disk, while preserving the full quality of the VHS. Virtual Dub noise
filters, half D1, reduced size-- I'm sorry to say that I failed. Miserably.
Anonymous
April 11, 2005 6:20:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Rule of thumb: about 2 hours of video max per DVD for very good
quality video in general (noisy video will look worse, but that's a junk
in = junk out thing).

You can push it to 3, but test and see. It may be okay, may not be
if you're picky. Forget 4 unless you really don't care about the
quality so much.

DL (dual layer) DVD drives double this to 4 hours of very good (SP)
video on a single DL disc. WIth the pioneer 109 drive at www.newegg.com
for $64 or so, it's a great upgrade to make if you want to store 2-4
hours of SP video onto a single DVD disc. (otherwise, you'll have to
split across two SL (single layer) DVD discs, or use lower quality
encodings).

---

How can you tell quickly? Find someone with a DVD recorder for the
TV or ask a salesperson in store if you can bring in and test with your
camcorder.

Simply hook up camcorder, set to 2 hr SP mode on the DVD recorder,
and copy. That quality of video is going to be at least as what you'll
get off a video -> PC -> DVD method, and usually lower than what you can
get off the PC -> DVD method if you do post-processing and 2-pass
encoding on the PC. (www.videohelp.com and www.deja.com for lots of
help on this lengthy process ; expect 4-6 hours+ encoding 1 hour of
video with processing for the very best results)

----

Pioneer has announced DL DVD recorder decks for the TV, so you can
easily dump 3 hours of video easy onto a DVD.

Later this year, HD DVD decks will arrive. These are HDTV recorders
that'll boast even better quality than any DVD recorder out there, and
will allow you to easily archive video w/o worry about compression
artifacts from a lowly VHS/camcorder input.

----

Something like the Pioneer DVR-220-S at walmart.com for $199 is a
good start if you don't want to spend so much time encoding on a PC.

(don't buy the cheaper junk like iLo, etc. there - their video quality
is poorer - see
http://www.videohelp.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=259291&p...).

Just plug in VHS, press play. Press record on deck, and wait until
done. Can't be easier or faster.
!