Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

No audio on some DVD-Video players... why?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
Share
April 20, 2005 2:40:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

I converted a PAL video to HTSC and authored a DVD-Video. I tested it
on PowerDVD and the sound was fine. I tested it on my Phillips and
Pioneer set-top DVD players and the sound was fine.

But my friend claims two of the three video clips have no sound when
he plays it on his set-top DVD player. (I don't know which model he
has... I will find out.)

I can't imagine why two of the three videos would work. I followed the
same process for all three. I used TDK DVD-R discs.

Any ideas?
Anonymous
April 21, 2005 10:37:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

On 20 Apr 2005 10:40:27 -0700, ThumperStrauss@hotmail.com (Thumper)
wrote:

>I converted a PAL video to HTSC and authored a DVD-Video. I tested it
>on PowerDVD and the sound was fine. I tested it on my Phillips and
>Pioneer set-top DVD players and the sound was fine.
>
>But my friend claims two of the three video clips have no sound when
>he plays it on his set-top DVD player. (I don't know which model he
>has... I will find out.)

It may be the case, if the audio es mpeg, which is compliant to PAL
DVD standard, but not to NTSC DVD. However, it uses to be supported by
NTSC players, nonetheless.
Anonymous
April 22, 2005 11:46:46 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"Thumper" <ThumperStrauss@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:6034426b.0504200940.1bcee753@posting.google.com...
> I converted a PAL video to HTSC and authored a DVD-Video. I tested it
> on PowerDVD and the sound was fine. I tested it on my Phillips and
> Pioneer set-top DVD players and the sound was fine.
>
> But my friend claims two of the three video clips have no sound when
> he plays it on his set-top DVD player. (I don't know which model he
> has... I will find out.)
>
> I can't imagine why two of the three videos would work. I followed the
> same process for all three. I used TDK DVD-R discs.
>
> Any ideas?

Been down this path before. Your audio is probably mpeg which is part
of the PAL spec, but not part of the NTSC spec. NTSC requires either
LPCM or AC3 (but almost all of the newer players will play the mpeg
audio). To add insult to injury, there are a number of the video desktop
applications out there that when you select to encode to NTSC DVD
actually generate the mpeg audio. All tests work fine, but as soon as
you send a copy of your new cool DVD to Aunt Martha, she will have
a player that can not handle it. I generally just use LPCM (which is
significantly larger than mpeg or AC3, but will work in almost all players,
although you do have to watch the size and bit rate).

mikey
Related resources
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 12:15:49 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

In article <P86dnVgDXvjIk_TfRVn-3g@comcast.com>,
Mike Fields <spam_me_not_mr.gadget2@comcast.net> wrote:
>
>"Thumper" <ThumperStrauss@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>news:6034426b.0504200940.1bcee753@posting.google.com...
>> I converted a PAL video to HTSC and authored a DVD-Video. I tested it
>> on PowerDVD and the sound was fine. I tested it on my Phillips and
>> Pioneer set-top DVD players and the sound was fine.
>>
>> But my friend claims two of the three video clips have no sound when
>> he plays it on his set-top DVD player. (I don't know which model he
>> has... I will find out.)
>>
>> I can't imagine why two of the three videos would work. I followed the
>> same process for all three. I used TDK DVD-R discs.
>>
>> Any ideas?
>
>Been down this path before. Your audio is probably mpeg which is part
>of the PAL spec, but not part of the NTSC spec. NTSC requires either
>LPCM or AC3 (but almost all of the newer players will play the mpeg
>audio). To add insult to injury, there are a number of the video desktop
>applications out there that when you select to encode to NTSC DVD
>actually generate the mpeg audio. All tests work fine, but as soon as
>you send a copy of your new cool DVD to Aunt Martha, she will have
>a player that can not handle it. I generally just use LPCM (which is
>significantly larger than mpeg or AC3, but will work in almost all players,
>although you do have to watch the size and bit rate).

Yep. The Lite-On set-top standalone DVD recorders encode all audio as
MPEG, too.
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 11:56:40 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

On Fri, 22 Apr 2005 07:46:46 -0700, "Mike Fields"
<spam_me_not_mr.gadget2@comcast.net> wrote:

>I generally just use LPCM (which is
>significantly larger than mpeg or AC3, but will work in almost all players

AC3 is common, both to PAL and to NTSC DVD standards, and you only
need 192 kbps for 2 channels.
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 11:56:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"Bariloche" <bariloche@bariloche.com> wrote in message
news:nu2l61tgrnfankk7tfaa5vjmtbusq95mjl@4ax.com...
> On Fri, 22 Apr 2005 07:46:46 -0700, "Mike Fields"
> <spam_me_not_mr.gadget2@comcast.net> wrote:
>
> >I generally just use LPCM (which is
> >significantly larger than mpeg or AC3, but will work in almost all
players
>
> AC3 is common, both to PAL and to NTSC DVD standards, and you only
> need 192 kbps for 2 channels.

That is true, however, the problem is many of the "dvd creation"
programs out there (the low end ones anyway), do NOT support
AC3 encoding -- they will use it if you have an encoder, but they
do not include one. I agree, the best option is to use AC3 if you
have it available to you (or can sneak the cost past the budget
director of an encoder). Even Uleads MSP 6.5 does not have
an AC3 encoder in it (I think 7 does, but I don't have that).

mikey
!