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Google Now Laying Fiber for Super-Fast Internet

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February 7, 2012 11:43:33 AM

Quote:
When officially launched, Google's network will provide speeds of 1 Gbps -- about 100 times faster than existing broadband services currently providing Internet access to homes nationwide.


...and theoretically 10x faster than my LAN connection of 100Mbps. So it download movies faster than transferring it to my other computer.
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February 7, 2012 11:49:16 AM

*Moves to Kansas-City*
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Anonymous
February 7, 2012 11:51:01 AM

@digiex
Buy a gigabit ethernet card :) 
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February 7, 2012 11:57:11 AM

bloodymaze*Moves to Kansas-City*



Right behind you
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February 7, 2012 12:00:32 PM

It's about time Google started laying the cables. There were articles about this project months ago, maybe even earlier.
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February 7, 2012 12:00:35 PM

Google needs to start laying lines in PA... How much is this gonna cost a month?
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February 7, 2012 12:04:25 PM

Time to pack my bags....oh wait, im already here :D 
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February 7, 2012 12:14:38 PM

I'm going to Kansas.....
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February 7, 2012 12:15:22 PM

Here I thought I wanted to move to Texas for reasons like: bigger steaks/burgers, big events, bigger curves, bigger everything,... I never thought that would include something like bigger/better internet.

No one on these forums have said it yet so I will: everything's bigger in Texas.
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Anonymous
February 7, 2012 12:21:37 PM

I can get 100 Mbps cable internet where I live in Australia, so this is only 10 times faster. Of course, none of that speed is actually usable so why bother?
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February 7, 2012 12:21:41 PM

oh noes, the *cough* competition *cough* will sue Google for too low a price at too good a product that will eliminate the competition and then Google might rise the prices or stop innovation,,, wait, this is already happening with all the BS caps and stuff like that...

Eliminate them all Google!!!

Include in there that french company that offers inferior maps to your free ones for a price.
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February 7, 2012 12:28:08 PM

computernerdforlifeHere I thought I wanted to move to Texas for reasons like: bigger steaks/burgers, big events, bigger curves, bigger everything,... I never thought that would include something like bigger/better internet. No one on these forums have said it yet so I will: everything's bigger in Texas.

Yeeeaaaaah, this article has nothing to do with Texas. At all.
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February 7, 2012 12:33:56 PM

It's odd they would lay these lines above ground, it's cheaper than going in ground of course, but much more prone to damage from just about anything from car crash to tornadoes.
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February 7, 2012 12:34:06 PM

Is Google just laying the infrastructure to lease out to existing ISP's, or will they also be the ISP? If the latter, that would be great. Go Google!
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February 7, 2012 12:36:57 PM

A company actually doing something good with their money? That's unusual. Internet providers are busy fixing prices usually. I hope this will force some sense in their businesses, as well.
Good for Google, I hope they expand this real soon.
Remains to be seen if Google will extend this service all the way to the consumer (like a regular ISP, only better), or they will end up leasing this "highway" to the usual perpetrators. I for one hope for the former.
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February 7, 2012 12:39:46 PM

dietcreamsodaIs Google just laying the infrastructure to lease out to existing ISP's, or will they also be the ISP? If the latter, that would be great. Go Google!

Thats what I was hoping I'd see in this article. The former sounds more likely though, sadly.
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February 7, 2012 12:40:40 PM

Finally Fiber optic.
I have used fiber optic between two PCs 4km apart on a network of fiber optic. I had no latency. It felt like i was using the computer right infront of me using the windows login. I wish that they would lay fiber optic in the country areas where there is a lack of internet.
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February 7, 2012 12:45:29 PM

@burnley14: Didn't you know? Texas has bigger suburbs, too. Like Kansas. And Oklahoma.
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February 7, 2012 12:55:49 PM

There is a pratical limit to bandwidth long before you hit gigabit speeds; Web servers cannot pump out anywhere near that kind of data. I have a decent 30Mbps connection (of which I get a consistent 25Mbps most of the time), but when it comes to streaming movies, and browsing web pages my connection is faster than Netflix and other sources can move. the nice thing though is that you can have a ton of users all downloading HD content at the same time, but the point remains the same; Anything faster than 20-30Mbps is wasted bandwidth right now for 'home use'. Now, if you are doing dedicated WAN networks where you want to do video editing and have your file server on the other side of town while you do the editing at home... sure... that will eat 1000Mbps (120MB/s) easily enough :) 
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February 7, 2012 1:03:42 PM

#caedenv
There are torrents, and future streaming options to match demand and supply and put the stress on the networks when absolutely needed, like streaming from multiple sources, as in each user gets that streamed video and is still holding it in memory and uploading it for the neighbour who is watching the same show but came home half a hour later.
Just because it is of not that beneficial now (and torrents are now :p ), gibabit internet is a very good step in the right direction.
Caps on bandwidth are the very exact opposite.
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February 7, 2012 1:04:10 PM

As soon as SOPA/ACTA will be voted the high speed internet will be pointless
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February 7, 2012 1:12:35 PM

So, when is Google going to implement this in their own backyard? I live in Silicon Valley, and yet AT&T U-verse is my only fiber option, and the speeds don't come anywhere close to this...
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February 7, 2012 2:11:38 PM

Hey let's at least give Google some credit for doing this. The other internet clowns have always been too scared of the cable and telephone companies to take them on directly. Hopefully, this spells the end of the line for Comcast and its crap service.
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February 7, 2012 2:33:49 PM

The town I live was one of the finalists for Google lines. We're a northern California town and it came down to us and Kansas City. It was Kansas City that ended up getting the nod. Too bad for us because we're stuck with Comcast now.

Also, some people are asking why it took so long for Google to get this rolled out. This isn't the fault of Google but instead the fault of the cities where they're working. Like any government institution, lots of red tape has to be cut in order to get things started.
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February 7, 2012 2:46:10 PM

So they are running a dedicated 1Gb line to each home, or a 1Gb backbone? If the latter, it does not give 1Gb to each home - it is shared bandwidth. If you have a network switch with a Gb uplink and 40 clients connected to it all trying to transfer files at the same time, no clients get Gb speed.
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February 7, 2012 2:59:27 PM

"This isn't Kansas anymore."
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February 7, 2012 3:07:25 PM

So they will get fast internet, but still get promised speeds that consumers will never actually see and charge 1 arm and 1 leg for service. Awesome!!! :-P
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February 7, 2012 3:08:09 PM

Don't worry it'll be capped bandwidth at 40gb a month. :) 
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February 7, 2012 3:39:06 PM

While it sounds awesome , this has conglomerate written all over it.

first google competed with yahoo and ask jeeves (Search Engine)

then they competed with apple and Microsoft (Chrome)

then they competed with Bell Labs and Intel (Google Lab X [Unconfirmed])

Now they are competing with Verizon and Cox (Data Services / Data Storage [Data Centers])

Did I miss any?

waiting for Google to take the fight to MSI , ASUS , and AMD.
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Anonymous
February 7, 2012 3:42:07 PM

Meanwhile in Bulgaria, unmetered 500Mbps connections for 40 Euros a month...
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February 7, 2012 4:20:52 PM

wardwingWhile it sounds awesome , this has conglomerate written all over it.first google competed with yahoo and ask jeeves (Search Engine)then they competed with apple and Microsoft (Chrome)then they competed with Bell Labs and Intel (Google Lab X [Unconfirmed])Now they are competing with Verizon and Cox (Data Services / Data Storage [Data Centers])Did I miss any?waiting for Google to take the fight to MSI , ASUS , and AMD.


google does a lot of stuff just experimentally, to see what sticks and what doesnt and what they can learn... that is what this project is about...

they also fund research in solar panels and self driving cars, but it doesnt mean that they want to be the next FORD
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February 7, 2012 4:36:19 PM

MelchiorMeanwhile in Bulgaria, unmetered 500Mbps connections for 40 Euros a month...


The USA is probably the only advanced country with crappy internet speeds for most home internet users across the entire country. A lot of other parts of the world have 100Mb+ connections, 250Mb/500Mb being pretty common. Gb is getting there, I think Korea already started getting 1Gb common place.

Funny thing is us Americans often pay more money for our crappy connections then other country's citizens pay for their much faster connections.
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February 7, 2012 4:37:31 PM

I didn't realize that urban areas still had above ground power/phone/cable/etc lines.

I'm also interested to find if they are going to actually sell their service to consumers or run it through a 3rd party.
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February 7, 2012 5:09:21 PM

Its always the ruralish redneck areas that get the fiber. How about San Diego CA????
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February 7, 2012 5:58:31 PM

For the people that say this isn't necessary or useful, look to the future. 4k video is just around the corner, and 8k is only a few years off.

For those that don't know, 8k is 33.2 megapixels of video (16x the resolution of 1080p) played at 120 frames a second with 22.2 audio, all 24 channels of which are 24-bit and double samplerate. I did a rough calculation of the file size for a two hour movie, and it is likely it will be bigger than a terabyte. Whether Blu-ray is the last or second to last optical format, no one questions that streaming will be the method of the future. However, our data infrastructure has a difficult (or impossible?) time streaming 1080p 7.1 with minimal compression. Our internet speeds are clearly a hindrance at the present.
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February 7, 2012 6:02:32 PM

I'm already getting these speeds in Japan for roughly 89$ a month. US is no where near Japan and Korea, and it's freaking sad.
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February 7, 2012 6:11:13 PM

I'm glad I live this close to Kansas City. Pretty soon I'll be getting it.

For those who want to move there, no you don't.
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February 7, 2012 6:11:30 PM

blazorthonThe USA is probably the only advanced country with crappy internet speeds for most home internet users across the entire country. A lot of other parts of the world have 100Mb+ connections, 250Mb/500Mb being pretty common. Gb is getting there, I think Korea already started getting 1Gb common place.Funny thing is us Americans often pay more money for our crappy connections then other country's citizens pay for their much faster connections.

Man, you should go to New Zealand...usable internet has not even reached that place! Speeds and pings are prehistoric..hobbit country. Couple of towns have some limited cable coverage... Word 'unlimited' is unheard of.
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February 7, 2012 6:29:20 PM

If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. What does Google get out of this?
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February 7, 2012 6:30:34 PM

Playing Battlefield 3 on a 30/30 mbit fiber connection (its the lowest connection I can get here)
I get a ping to another danish server of about 7, and any server in Europa under 30 ping.
My LAN is 1 gbit but theres no ISP selling that speed, the best i can get is a 250/250 mbit for 175 dollars per month

I have had fiber for some years now in this small no important Denmark
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February 7, 2012 6:31:04 PM

blazorthonThe USA is probably the only advanced country with crappy internet speeds for most home internet users across the entire country. A lot of other parts of the world have 100Mb+ connections, 250Mb/500Mb being pretty common. Gb is getting there, I think Korea already started getting 1Gb common place.Funny thing is us Americans often pay more money for our crappy connections then other country's citizens pay for their much faster connections.


We have the cheapest gasoline out of all advanced nations.

The grass always seems greener on the other side of the fence.
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February 7, 2012 6:31:20 PM

blurr91 said:
If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. What does Google get out of this?


Well, they get money out of it.
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February 7, 2012 6:32:47 PM

blurr91 said:
We have the cheapest gasoline out of all advanced nations.

The grass always seems greener on the other side of the fence.


We also have the among greatest dependencies on gasoline and similar fuels out of the advanced nations.
We have among the most inefficient cars and the least number of alternative fuel cars.

The grass really is greener on the other side.
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February 7, 2012 6:36:44 PM

A lot of the reason Europe, Korea and Japan are so far ahead of the US is because of population density. The US is much more spread out then Europe. Even cities themselves are spread out. Take a look at a city like LA or Chicago, they are huge, both in population and in land area compared to Tokyo, or Seoul or even Paris. So, it takes a much bigger investment on the part of the cable/telecom companies to lay down lines. Granted, they don't really plan ahead and instead try to blame their problems on the users, but they do incur higher costs then companies in Europe/Asia.

In my area for instance, we have AT&T and TWC. Time Warner was getting beat pretty bad in the speed/price category vs AT&T. However, they recently laid down a small fiber infrastructure to match speeds. Why didn't they plan ahead and lay down lines like Google to give 1Gbps speeds to people? Sure they would have spent a lot up front, but if they did it quietly enough, AT&T would have been a couple years behind and TWC could have absorbed the whole market in the area. They are just going to have to spend more money to upgrade soon again anyway. Pointless.
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February 7, 2012 6:37:11 PM

Can't wait until it makes it's way to northeast Ohio, hopefully in the not too distant future.
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February 7, 2012 6:37:54 PM

blazorthonThe USA is probably the only advanced country with crappy internet speeds for most home internet users across the entire country. A lot of other parts of the world have 100Mb+ connections, 250Mb/500Mb being pretty common. Gb is getting there, I think Korea already started getting 1Gb common place.Funny thing is us Americans often pay more money for our crappy connections then other country's citizens pay for their much faster connections.


True... But I would not trade it for being able to live in a WIDE open country like the USA. I have been to France, Italy,Malta,and Germany and IMO the people live on top of each other (like NYC)

Not sure but I think Texas is as BIG as France

Retired USMC
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February 7, 2012 6:38:21 PM

blazorthonWell, they get money out of it.


Hmmm...I have yet to see a business model from this experiment. Can you enlighten me?
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February 7, 2012 6:39:07 PM

wydileie said:
A lot of the reason Europe, Korea and Japan are so far ahead of the US is because of population density. The US is much more spread out then Europe. Even cities themselves are spread out. Take a look at a city like LA or Chicago, they are huge, both in population and in land area compared to Tokyo, or Seoul or even Paris. So, it takes a much bigger investment on the part of the cable/telecom companies to lay down lines. Granted, they don't really plan ahead and instead try to blame their problems on the users, but they do incur higher costs then companies in Europe/Asia.

In my area for instance, we have AT&T and TWC. Time Warner was getting beat pretty bad in the speed/price category vs AT&T. However, they recently laid down a small fiber infrastructure to match speeds. Why didn't they plan ahead and lay down lines like Google to give 1Gbps speeds to people? Sure they would have spent a lot up front, but if they did it quietly enough, AT&T would have been a couple years behind and TWC could have absorbed the whole market in the area. They are just going to have to spend more money to upgrade soon again anyway. Pointless.

Agreed. I've said it before myself too. For the same amount of investment money, they can reach more people in Europe with better equipment, because everyone is much closer together.
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February 7, 2012 6:39:21 PM

blurr91 said:
Hmmm...I have yet to see a business model from this experiment. Can you enlighten me?


You don't think they'd give the 1Gb connections out for free, do you?
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