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Archiving 8mm analog video

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Anonymous
August 23, 2005 12:00:16 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

I have roughly 30 hours of video on 8mm analog video tape. I now need to
capture all of this into the PC and make somewhat usable DVDs for viewing
(family events over the past 13 years).

My question is what to do with al of the raw footage? I have enough
diskspace to capture everything but don't want to leave it all on the PC
after I am done. I was thinking of writing the captured clips out to miniDV
tapes via my miniDV camcorder for long term storage and letting go of the
analog tapes and camera.

Thoughts?

Thanks,

Mike
August 23, 2005 2:21:54 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Probably the best thing you can do these days is to put it on a hard
drive and leave it there. It saves the transfer back to tape, and
probably is the longest-lasting medium, from a longevity standpoint
(although I haven't really read anything about long-term durability of
hard drives, I suspect they're much more robust than helical-scan
tape. )

Hard drives can be had for 25 cents a GB or so. At 12 GB per hour,
that's three bucks an hour. High quality Hi 8 tape like the Fuji
professional series costs almost exactly the same, at least $6 for a
two hour tape. . Sony Excellence DV tape is hard to get for much less
than about $8 per hour.

These days I keep all my video projects on external USB 2 hard drives
while they're active and just leave 'em there when "done", just in
case I ever need them.



Mike Wilcox <mike.j.wilcox@intel.com> wrote:

>I have roughly 30 hours of video on 8mm analog video tape. I now need to
>capture all of this into the PC and make somewhat usable DVDs for viewing
>(family events over the past 13 years).
>
>My question is what to do with al of the raw footage? I have enough
>diskspace to capture everything but don't want to leave it all on the PC
>after I am done. I was thinking of writing the captured clips out to miniDV
>tapes via my miniDV camcorder for long term storage and letting go of the
>analog tapes and camera.
>
>Thoughts?
>
>Thanks,
>
>Mike
August 23, 2005 3:50:23 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Why not just save all the raw footage to a collection of DVD's, in
whatever format you want, as Data Files?
Monte


Mike Wilcox wrote:
> I have roughly 30 hours of video on 8mm analog video tape. I now need to
> capture all of this into the PC and make somewhat usable DVDs for viewing
> (family events over the past 13 years).
>
> My question is what to do with al of the raw footage? I have enough
> diskspace to capture everything but don't want to leave it all on the PC
> after I am done. I was thinking of writing the captured clips out to miniDV
> tapes via my miniDV camcorder for long term storage and letting go of the
> analog tapes and camera.
>
> Thoughts?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Mike
Related resources
Anonymous
August 23, 2005 10:51:34 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

What I did:
-Copied all tapes to PC, edited, and wrote to DVD as MPEG
-Deleted video from PC when converted
-Kept 8mm taes
-Sold camera

You could keep all the archive raw video on hard drive - but then
you'd need a backup - so that that's a lot of drive space for
something I'll never look at

You could convert all to MiniDV - but that's a hassle

I left it on 8mm - and IF I ever need it, I'll borrow 8mm camcorder
from someone and get raw video.

If you do a good conversion to DVD (like with TMPGE encoder) I'm happy
with the quality - and I seriously doubt I'll need to access raw
footage.

On Mon, 22 Aug 2005 20:00:16 +0000 (UTC), Mike Wilcox
<mike.j.wilcox@intel.com> wrote:

>I have roughly 30 hours of video on 8mm analog video tape. I now need to
>capture all of this into the PC and make somewhat usable DVDs for viewing
>(family events over the past 13 years).
>
>My question is what to do with al of the raw footage? I have enough
>diskspace to capture everything but don't want to leave it all on the PC
>after I am done. I was thinking of writing the captured clips out to miniDV
>tapes via my miniDV camcorder for long term storage and letting go of the
>analog tapes and camera.
>
>Thoughts?
>
>Thanks,
>
>Mike
Anonymous
August 23, 2005 1:07:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"JT" wrote ...
> Probably the best thing you can do these days is to put it on a hard
> drive and leave it there. It saves the transfer back to tape, and
> probably is the longest-lasting medium, from a longevity standpoint
> (although I haven't really read anything about long-term durability of
> hard drives, I suspect they're much more robust than helical-scan
> tape. )
>
> Hard drives can be had for 25 cents a GB or so. At 12 GB per hour,
> that's three bucks an hour. High quality Hi 8 tape like the Fuji
> professional series costs almost exactly the same, at least $6 for a
> two hour tape. . Sony Excellence DV tape is hard to get for much less
> than about $8 per hour.
>
> These days I keep all my video projects on external USB 2 hard drives
> while they're active and just leave 'em there when "done", just in
> case I ever need them.

Yikes. I've had hard drives die on me in mid-production.
Depending on them to sit on the shelf for months/years
and spin up upon demand is way more faith than I still
have in them. Good luck.
Anonymous
August 23, 2005 3:05:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Mike Wilcox wrote:

> I have roughly 30 hours of video on 8mm analog video tape. I now need to
> capture all of this into the PC and make somewhat usable DVDs for viewing
> (family events over the past 13 years).
>
> My question is what to do with al of the raw footage? I have enough

Plug camcorder into any DVD recorder deck for TV, press record and
play, and off you go. One tape = one nice DVD.

(same can be done on a PC)

---

As for the original, don't worry about it -- 8mm analog is so
low-res, any DVD in 1 hour mode will easily capture the 'original'
quality quite nicely w/o having to worry about 'missing' some resolution
or detail.

I simply don't worry about the original source coming from 8mm/VHS-C
from the 'ol days - the tapes, sensor,etc. simply weren't that good, and
there simply isn't anything there to keep on tape.

--

If you simply =must= have the original, dump to DV tapes - standard,
high quality, easy, and you'll have some player a decade or two from now
that'll handle this format.
August 23, 2005 11:27:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"Mike Wilcox" <mike.j.wilcox@intel.com> wrote in message
news:Xns96BA8449E8C3Fmikejwilcoxintelcom@10.7.208.6...
>I have roughly 30 hours of video on 8mm analog video tape. I now need to
> capture all of this into the PC and make somewhat usable DVDs for viewing
> (family events over the past 13 years).
>
> My question is what to do with al of the raw footage? I have enough
> diskspace to capture everything but don't want to leave it all on the PC
> after I am done. I was thinking of writing the captured clips out to
> miniDV
> tapes via my miniDV camcorder for long term storage and letting go of the
> analog tapes and camera.
>
> Thoughts?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Mike

Mike,
Everyone replying didn't get the part about you saying after you're done
putting them on DVD what do you do with the
raw footage still on dv format on your PC, correct?
I would (especially like you mentioned, you already have a dv camcorder)
just run the dv-avi back out onto fresh miniDV
tapes and store as backups in closet. DVD's get scratched and maybe
dvd-rot(were glue deteriorated) in 5 or 10 years.
So at least you'll have your new (already digital) miniDV tapes to run back
into the computer and burn off a few more dvd's with.
Tapes can at least last 25 years, so every quarter of a century or until
(blu-ray is actually here and no blu-ray rot exists) just transfer
digital signal over to new tapes. After all, there is no going back! Those
13 years are precious as the life itself they have captured.
Don't be cheap about buying 10 or 20 miniDV tapes to back them up to, you
already got it in the PC, why not?

Oh, then erase Hi8 tapes and sell camcorder on ebay to pay for new miniDV
tapes. :)  Simple.

AnthonyR
Anonymous
August 24, 2005 2:23:53 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

I am doing the same with my 250 hrs of my 8mm, Hi8 and D8 tapes.

The Mpegs can be imported back into the PC if required and edited with
something like Womble.

1.5 hr per DVD of 8mm and Hi8 and 1 hr of D8 looks as good as the original.

Regards,

Martin


"DelawareDave" <davejunkmail123@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:gfvlg1hkr61u4a0ci296k8cbm2i64b4mei@4ax.com...
> What I did:
> -Copied all tapes to PC, edited, and wrote to DVD as MPEG
> -Deleted video from PC when converted
> -Kept 8mm taes
> -Sold camera
>
> You could keep all the archive raw video on hard drive - but then
> you'd need a backup - so that that's a lot of drive space for
> something I'll never look at
>
> You could convert all to MiniDV - but that's a hassle
>
> I left it on 8mm - and IF I ever need it, I'll borrow 8mm camcorder
> from someone and get raw video.
>
> If you do a good conversion to DVD (like with TMPGE encoder) I'm happy
> with the quality - and I seriously doubt I'll need to access raw
> footage.
>
> On Mon, 22 Aug 2005 20:00:16 +0000 (UTC), Mike Wilcox
> <mike.j.wilcox@intel.com> wrote:
>
>>I have roughly 30 hours of video on 8mm analog video tape. I now need to
>>capture all of this into the PC and make somewhat usable DVDs for viewing
>>(family events over the past 13 years).
>>
>>My question is what to do with al of the raw footage? I have enough
>>diskspace to capture everything but don't want to leave it all on the PC
>>after I am done. I was thinking of writing the captured clips out to
>>miniDV
>>tapes via my miniDV camcorder for long term storage and letting go of the
>>analog tapes and camera.
>>
>>Thoughts?
>>
>>Thanks,
>>
>>Mike
August 24, 2005 5:47:26 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Mike Wilcox <mike.j.wilcox@intel.com> wrote:

>I have roughly 30 hours of video on 8mm analog video tape. I now need to
>capture all of this into the PC and make somewhat usable DVDs for viewing
>(family events over the past 13 years).
>
>My question is what to do with al of the raw footage? I have enough
>diskspace to capture everything but don't want to leave it all on the PC
>after I am done. I was thinking of writing the captured clips out to miniDV
>tapes via my miniDV camcorder for long term storage and letting go of the
>analog tapes and camera.
>
>Thoughts?
>
>Thanks,
>
>Mike

The easy way is to buy a DVD video recorder and copy your 8mm tapes to
the hard drive or directly to DVD on the DVD recorder. Which seems to
be what most people are doing these days.
Video stored on tape can deteriorate over time and can be damaged due
to magnetic sources.
It's cheaper to store video to DVD than to store it to a spare hard
drive.

Regards Brian
August 24, 2005 7:48:10 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

AnthonyR wrote:
> "Mike Wilcox" <mike.j.wilcox@intel.com> wrote in message
> news:Xns96BA8449E8C3Fmikejwilcoxintelcom@10.7.208.6...
>
>>I have roughly 30 hours of video on 8mm analog video tape. I now need to
>>capture all of this into the PC and make somewhat usable DVDs for viewing
>>(family events over the past 13 years).
>>
>>My question is what to do with al of the raw footage? I have enough
>>diskspace to capture everything but don't want to leave it all on the PC
>>after I am done. I was thinking of writing the captured clips out to
>>miniDV
>>tapes via my miniDV camcorder for long term storage and letting go of the
>>analog tapes and camera.
>>
>>Thoughts?
>>
>>Thanks,
>>
>>Mike
>
>
> Mike,
> Everyone replying didn't get the part about you saying after you're done
> putting them on DVD what do you do with the
> raw footage still on dv format on your PC, correct?
> I would (especially like you mentioned, you already have a dv camcorder)
> just run the dv-avi back out onto fresh miniDV
> tapes and store as backups in closet. DVD's get scratched and maybe
> dvd-rot(were glue deteriorated) in 5 or 10 years.
> So at least you'll have your new (already digital) miniDV tapes to run back
> into the computer and burn off a few more dvd's with.
> Tapes can at least last 25 years, so every quarter of a century or until
> (blu-ray is actually here and no blu-ray rot exists) just transfer
> digital signal over to new tapes. After all, there is no going back! Those
> 13 years are precious as the life itself they have captured.
> Don't be cheap about buying 10 or 20 miniDV tapes to back them up to, you
> already got it in the PC, why not?
>
> Oh, then erase Hi8 tapes and sell camcorder on ebay to pay for new miniDV
> tapes. :)  Simple.

Has anyone personally run into DVD/CD rot? I've heard the rumours, never
run into it. I still have the very first CD I bought, "Brothers in Arms"
from like 1985 or so, it's as perfect as the day I bought it. Twenty
years and it looks and plays like new.
August 24, 2005 6:15:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

CD / DVD rot..........good question, and a poignant point to consider
in the archival requirement.
I haven't seen much discussion about this, just a news article where the
journalist found a fellow whose entire CD collection had flaked to nothing
(the disks looked like old mirrors, speckled). Supposedly he had a twenty
year old collection of commercial releases that got "lost".
I guess the binder fails and the coatings come off.
They mentioned this is a phenomenon that has been licked. But who knows
how true that is.
Accelerated testing has it's limits. How can you rely on this?
Of course I'm not making an argument for tape, as I have audio tapes that
are 40 years old and the oxides are not that stable anymore. But we need
more
serious documentation on what CD/DVD expectanties are.
As archivists, in our own right, we want good research !!
Anonymous
August 24, 2005 8:29:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"Rôgêr" wrote...
> Has anyone personally run into DVD/CD rot? I've heard the rumours, never
> run into it. I still have the very first CD I bought, "Brothers in Arms"
> from like 1985 or so, it's as perfect as the day I bought it. Twenty years
> and it looks and plays like new.

I have not seen commercially-pressed discs fail.

But I certainly have field-burned (CDR & DVDR) discs that
played fine when new and are now useless. Field-burnable
optical discs are NOT reliable long-term archival storate IME.
Anonymous
August 24, 2005 10:01:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

begin quotation
from Richard Crowley <richard.7.crowley@intel.com>
in message <defj47$4ag$1@news01.intel.com>
posted at 2005-08-23T16:07
> Yikes. I've had hard drives die on me in mid-production.
> Depending on them to sit on the shelf for months/years
> and spin up upon demand is way more faith than I still
> have in them. Good luck.

Recordable DVDs are not much more expensive per gigabyte; the main
problem becomes chopping up files into DVD-sized chunks.

--
___ _ _____ |*|
/ __| |/ / _ \ |*| Shawn K. Quinn
\__ \ ' < (_) | |*| skquinn@speakeasy.net
|___/_|\_\__\_\ |*| Houston, TX, USA
!