Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Adding text documents to a video on DVD

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
Share
Anonymous
September 7, 2005 8:01:37 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

I have a client that wants to offer, in addition to a documentary video,
printable text documents as menu items on his DVD. Can that be done with
DVD Architect? Can that be done? Where would you go for a how-to? I've
tried searches of several forums with no success.

Steve King
Anonymous
September 7, 2005 8:01:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

As far as I know you would need to make it a fixed format DVD. The main
video playable on any DVD player but with PC format files for use on a
computer.
Anonymous
September 8, 2005 4:49:59 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

On Wed, 7 Sep 2005 16:01:37 -0500, "Steve King"
<steveSPAMBLOCK@stevekingSPAMBLOCK.net> wrote:

>I have a client that wants to offer, in addition to a documentary video,
>printable text documents as menu items on his DVD. Can that be done with
>DVD Architect? Can that be done? Where would you go for a how-to? I've
>tried searches of several forums with no success.
>
>Steve King
>

Printable text documents on a DVD Video disc, it can't be done..

A DVD-Video disc can contain other files which are not readable by a
standard DVD player, but which can be interpreted and read by a
DVD-ROM drive in a computer. This means any folders or files outside
of the VIDEO_TS or AUDIO_TS folders are fair game for interactivity
experiences.

What you want is called HYBRID DVD: In general, any interactivity or
experience that is beyond the DVD-Video disc specifications is called
a Hybrid DVD.

The cheapest way is to add autorun.inf on the DVD that brings up a
HTML page when the DVD is inserted into a P.C. (autoplay on Mac) That
HTML page will have a menu pointing to your html pages that have the
text you want, and the videos you want played and use "Javascript:
Print Page" to print your text page.

Your not going to be able to play *.vob's in the VIDEO_TS folder from
the Interactive DVD MENU running on P.C.( because you don't know if
P.C. has mpeg2 codecs installed and you have to supply a player on DVD
which complicates things, this is where Macromedia Director comes in
handy). What you might have to do is have 2 sets of video's, one, the
ordinal VIDEO_TS that play in standalone dvd player and a QuickTime or
Windows Media Video's.that play on computer.

Alot of the interactive DVD's are done with Macromedia Director. There
also other Multimedia Authoring Software like Multimedia Builder

With MMB you can develop autorun menus, multimedia apps, or front-ends
for your CD's* without having to spend months learning complex
programming languages.
http://mmb.mediachance.com/index.html
http://stream.uen.org/medsol/dvd/pages/dvdvid_features_...

Free: The CyberEditor. The ideal software tool for multimedia document
creation
http://www.cogniscienceinc.com/en/cyberediteur-e-descri...
http://www.educational-software-directory.net/multimedi...

Hope ths helps
Jim
Related resources
Anonymous
September 8, 2005 4:50:00 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"JimK" <1alpha@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:js1vh1pmijhn3s1t57s3stffrp1ftema4g@4ax.com...
> On Wed, 7 Sep 2005 16:01:37 -0500, "Steve King"
> <steveSPAMBLOCK@stevekingSPAMBLOCK.net> wrote:
>
>>I have a client that wants to offer, in addition to a documentary video,
>>printable text documents as menu items on his DVD. Can that be done with
>>DVD Architect? Can that be done? Where would you go for a how-to? I've
>>tried searches of several forums with no success.
>>
>>Steve King
>>
>
> Printable text documents on a DVD Video disc, it can't be done..
>
> A DVD-Video disc can contain other files which are not readable by a
> standard DVD player, but which can be interpreted and read by a
> DVD-ROM drive in a computer. This means any folders or files outside
> of the VIDEO_TS or AUDIO_TS folders are fair game for interactivity
> experiences.
>
> What you want is called HYBRID DVD: In general, any interactivity or
> experience that is beyond the DVD-Video disc specifications is called
> a Hybrid DVD.
>
> The cheapest way is to add autorun.inf on the DVD that brings up a
> HTML page when the DVD is inserted into a P.C. (autoplay on Mac) That
> HTML page will have a menu pointing to your html pages that have the
> text you want, and the videos you want played and use "Javascript:
> Print Page" to print your text page.
>
> Your not going to be able to play *.vob's in the VIDEO_TS folder from
> the Interactive DVD MENU running on P.C.( because you don't know if
> P.C. has mpeg2 codecs installed and you have to supply a player on DVD
> which complicates things, this is where Macromedia Director comes in
> handy). What you might have to do is have 2 sets of video's, one, the
> ordinal VIDEO_TS that play in standalone dvd player and a QuickTime or
> Windows Media Video's.that play on computer.
>
> Alot of the interactive DVD's are done with Macromedia Director. There
> also other Multimedia Authoring Software like Multimedia Builder
>
> With MMB you can develop autorun menus, multimedia apps, or front-ends
> for your CD's* without having to spend months learning complex
> programming languages.
> http://mmb.mediachance.com/index.html
> http://stream.uen.org/medsol/dvd/pages/dvdvid_features_...
>
> Free: The CyberEditor. The ideal software tool for multimedia document
> creation
> http://www.cogniscienceinc.com/en/cyberediteur-e-descri...
> http://www.educational-software-directory.net/multimedi...
>
> Hope ths helps
> Jim

Thanks, Jim. You've given me --- and my client a lot to think about. I
appreciate the time and care you took in your answer.

Steve King
September 8, 2005 10:38:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

On Thu, 8 Sep 2005 07:41:15 -0500, in 'rec.video.desktop',
in article <Re: Adding text documents to a video on DVD>,
"Steve King" <steveSPAMBLOCK@stevekingSPAMBLOCK.net> wrote:

>Now, as soon as I hear from Ahead Software
>(Nero) and find a solution to my "won't install" problem, I'll give it a
>try.
>
>Steve King

Steve:

As I recall, you were getting a "not a Win32 app" message when
attempting to run the installer (setup program). This is almost always
(about 98 percent of the time) caused by a bad file. That is, bad in
the sense that it's corrupt--either one or more bits in the file are
flipped or the file was an incomplete download. Incomplete downloads
are especially common on dial-up connections but can also happen on
T-3 links when the server is overloaded.

I would recommend that, if at all possible, you download the file
again. After doing so, but prior to running it, check to see if its
size (in exact bytes, not some rounded-off megabyte value) is
different from the file which you originally downloaded. You can
easily do this by right-clicking on the file in Windows Explorer and
choosing Properties from the pop-up context menu which appears (or
just highlight (select) the file by left-clicking on it and then doing
an Alt-Enter on your keyboard). If the two files differ in size, then
you definitely have a bad download problem.

OTOH, if the two files are the exact same size (in bytes), then you
might want to do a command line file compare binary (fc /b) operation
to see if the contents of the two files differ. If your first download
was located in your C:\Download directory (folder) and your second
download was located in your C:\Steve directory, for example, then the
command to use would be as follows:

fc /b c:\download\setup.exe c:\steve\setup.exe

The b switch (/b) in the command line says to do a binary compare.
Needless to say, you'll have to substitute the appropriate file name
where I've used setup.exe in the example, and adjust the directory
names as necessary as well.

To get to a command prompt, use Start | Run | command.com in Win9x/Me
and Start | Run | cmd.exe in Win2K/XP. Use the 'exit' command to close
the command prompt window when you're done.

If, based upon the result of the fc /b command, the contents of the
two files match, then most likely the file on the server is bad, in
which case about all that you can do is to wait for the Nero folks to
fix it.

Good luck!

--
Frank, Independent Consultant, New York, NY
[Please remove 'nojunkmail.' from address to reply via e-mail.]
Read Frank's thoughts on HDV at http://www.humanvalues.net/hdv/
Anonymous
September 8, 2005 10:38:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"Frank" <frank@nojunkmail.humanvalues.net> wrote in message
news:tc01i1prb7laraeisq90ebnfnlbrfjl6ri@4ax.com...
> On Thu, 8 Sep 2005 07:41:15 -0500, in 'rec.video.desktop',
> in article <Re: Adding text documents to a video on DVD>,
> "Steve King" <steveSPAMBLOCK@stevekingSPAMBLOCK.net> wrote:
>
>>Now, as soon as I hear from Ahead Software
>>(Nero) and find a solution to my "won't install" problem, I'll give it a
>>try.
>>
>>Steve King

Is this a great newsgroup, or what! Thanks. I'll do that right now. I've
always been a generalist, so to speak, in my various endeavors. I like it
that way. But, the range of sometimes arcane knowledge and the esoteric
skill set it takes to operate a small production company is daunting these
days. Thanks for the help.

Steve King
>
> Steve:
>
> As I recall, you were getting a "not a Win32 app" message when
> attempting to run the installer (setup program). This is almost always
> (about 98 percent of the time) caused by a bad file. That is, bad in
> the sense that it's corrupt--either one or more bits in the file are
> flipped or the file was an incomplete download. Incomplete downloads
> are especially common on dial-up connections but can also happen on
> T-3 links when the server is overloaded.
>
> I would recommend that, if at all possible, you download the file
> again. After doing so, but prior to running it, check to see if its
> size (in exact bytes, not some rounded-off megabyte value) is
> different from the file which you originally downloaded. You can
> easily do this by right-clicking on the file in Windows Explorer and
> choosing Properties from the pop-up context menu which appears (or
> just highlight (select) the file by left-clicking on it and then doing
> an Alt-Enter on your keyboard). If the two files differ in size, then
> you definitely have a bad download problem.
>
> OTOH, if the two files are the exact same size (in bytes), then you
> might want to do a command line file compare binary (fc /b) operation
> to see if the contents of the two files differ. If your first download
> was located in your C:\Download directory (folder) and your second
> download was located in your C:\Steve directory, for example, then the
> command to use would be as follows:
>
> fc /b c:\download\setup.exe c:\steve\setup.exe
>
> The b switch (/b) in the command line says to do a binary compare.
> Needless to say, you'll have to substitute the appropriate file name
> where I've used setup.exe in the example, and adjust the directory
> names as necessary as well.
>
> To get to a command prompt, use Start | Run | command.com in Win9x/Me
> and Start | Run | cmd.exe in Win2K/XP. Use the 'exit' command to close
> the command prompt window when you're done.
>
> If, based upon the result of the fc /b command, the contents of the
> two files match, then most likely the file on the server is bad, in
> which case about all that you can do is to wait for the Nero folks to
> fix it.
>
> Good luck!
>
> --
> Frank, Independent Consultant, New York, NY
> [Please remove 'nojunkmail.' from address to reply via e-mail.]
> Read Frank's thoughts on HDV at http://www.humanvalues.net/hdv/
Anonymous
September 8, 2005 10:38:36 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"Steve King" <steveSPAMBLOCK@stevekingSPAMBLOCK.net> wrote in message
news:CtudnWMzILuHEb3eRVn-tA@comcast.com...
> "Frank" <frank@nojunkmail.humanvalues.net> wrote in message
> news:tc01i1prb7laraeisq90ebnfnlbrfjl6ri@4ax.com...
>> On Thu, 8 Sep 2005 07:41:15 -0500, in 'rec.video.desktop',
>> in article <Re: Adding text documents to a video on DVD>,
>> "Steve King" <steveSPAMBLOCK@stevekingSPAMBLOCK.net> wrote:
>>
>>>Now, as soon as I hear from Ahead Software
>>>(Nero) and find a solution to my "won't install" problem, I'll give it a
>>>try.
>>>
>>>Steve King
>
> Is this a great newsgroup, or what! Thanks. I'll do that right now.
> I've always been a generalist, so to speak, in my various endeavors. I
> like it that way. But, the range of sometimes arcane knowledge and the
> esoteric skill set it takes to operate a small production company is
> daunting these days. Thanks for the help.
>
> Steve King
>>
>> Steve:
>>
>> As I recall, you were getting a "not a Win32 app" message when
>> attempting to run the installer (setup program). This is almost always
>> (about 98 percent of the time) caused by a bad file. That is, bad in
>> the sense that it's corrupt--either one or more bits in the file are
>> flipped or the file was an incomplete download. Incomplete downloads
>> are especially common on dial-up connections but can also happen on
>> T-3 links when the server is overloaded.
>>
>> I would recommend that, if at all possible, you download the file
>> again. After doing so, but prior to running it, check to see if its
>> size (in exact bytes, not some rounded-off megabyte value) is
>> different from the file which you originally downloaded. You can
>> easily do this by right-clicking on the file in Windows Explorer and
>> choosing Properties from the pop-up context menu which appears (or
>> just highlight (select) the file by left-clicking on it and then doing
>> an Alt-Enter on your keyboard). If the two files differ in size, then
>> you definitely have a bad download problem.
>>
>> OTOH, if the two files are the exact same size (in bytes), then you
>> might want to do a command line file compare binary (fc /b) operation
>> to see if the contents of the two files differ. If your first download
>> was located in your C:\Download directory (folder) and your second
>> download was located in your C:\Steve directory, for example, then the
>> command to use would be as follows:
>>
>> fc /b c:\download\setup.exe c:\steve\setup.exe
>>
>> The b switch (/b) in the command line says to do a binary compare.
>> Needless to say, you'll have to substitute the appropriate file name
>> where I've used setup.exe in the example, and adjust the directory
>> names as necessary as well.
>>
>> To get to a command prompt, use Start | Run | command.com in Win9x/Me
>> and Start | Run | cmd.exe in Win2K/XP. Use the 'exit' command to close
>> the command prompt window when you're done.
>>
>> If, based upon the result of the fc /b command, the contents of the
>> two files match, then most likely the file on the server is bad, in
>> which case about all that you can do is to wait for the Nero folks to
>> fix it.
>>
>> Good luck!
>>
>> --
>> Frank, Independent Consultant, New York, NY
>> [Please remove 'nojunkmail.' from address to reply via e-mail.]
>> Read Frank's thoughts on HDV at http://www.humanvalues.net/hdv/
>


Thanks, Frank. Two corrupted install files found. Problem solved.

Steve King
September 9, 2005 3:26:13 AM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

On Thu, 8 Sep 2005 16:19:57 -0500, in 'rec.video.desktop',
in article <Re: Adding text documents to a video on DVD>,
"Steve King" <steveSPAMBLOCK@stevekingSPAMBLOCK.net> wrote:

>Thanks, Frank. Two corrupted install files found. Problem solved.
>
>Steve King

Steve, that's what I wanted to hear ("problem solved"), else I would
have been forced to mention that the *other* primary cause of a "not a
valid Win32 application" message is the presence of a virus on the
system, and I only wanted to consider that possibility as a last
resort.

Enjoy Nero, btw. I've been using it as my burning program for years
now and have only rarely encountered any problem with it.

Regards,

--
Frank, Independent Consultant, New York, NY
[Please remove 'nojunkmail.' from address to reply via e-mail.]
Read Frank's thoughts on HDV at http://www.humanvalues.net/hdv/
Anonymous
September 9, 2005 4:59:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

William Davis wrote:

> Steve,
>
> If you really need to access a text file from within the menu structure
> of the DVD, there are capabilities in various authoring systems for
> doing this.
>
> For example, I use DVD Studio Pro on my Mac and there's a function
> called DVD@CCESS that allows opening and displaying a linked file from
> within a DVD.
>
> So putting, for example, a PDF document on the DVD-ROM - and linking it
> to a menu button - would call up Acrobat and launch a printable document
> within the DVD interface.
>
> The function has about 9-10 pages in the DVDSP manual, so it's not
> particularly difficult - just a bit tricky about making sure you have
> the links right and understanding that it will install a little parser
> (DVD@CCESS Installer) on each DVD so that WinTel machines can make sense
> of the linkage.
>
> It's just an example of how a good authoring program will give you the
> tools to do this kind of thing in a pretty straightforward manner.
>
> Ask around, I'm sure something on the PC will do this every bit as
> efficiently.

I have just purchased the DVDit Pro Version 6 with eDVD from Sonic. The
eDVD is a program that allows you to put links to anything you want
within the DVD. The two programs were on an intro special together for
$199, but are probably more now.

Gary Eickmeier
!