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Hard Drive

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Anonymous
April 3, 2004 12:20:36 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

I have an external hard drive conencted through an
internal firewire card. This disk is meant to be 120GB
when I format & partition in within XP ntfs I only get
111GB usable. Can anyone please tell me how to
format/partition it to it's full capacity.
Thanks Viv

More about : hard drive

Anonymous
April 3, 2004 9:28:07 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Hi Viv

Here is the same response that I posted in this thread earlier. It also
applies to your query.

You are not missing any space - although the drive manufacturer could be
clearer. For drive manufacturers 1,000,000,000 bytes = 1 Gb, whereas an OS
will regard 1,073,741,824 bytes as 1 Gb. (It's a decimal V binary thing)

The best way to see this is in XP. With XP installed, open My Computer,
select the appropriate
drive and right-click, select properties... beside 'capacity' you will see
the total number of bytes on your disk and to the right the number of
Gigabytes.

For example, on my 120 Gb drive I have 120,023,252,992 bytes... which is
also listed in disk properties as a capacity of 111 Gb.

The Hard Drive manufacturer refers to the 'bytes' total in my case as 120
Gb... and, in purely decimal terms, it is - 120,000,000,000 bytes.

The 111 Gb is what the operating system (XP in this case) 'sees'... because
the OS
calculates the storage in binary terms... 1024 bytes as 1 Kb, 1024 Kb as 1
Mb, and 1024 MB as 1 Gb.....

so in my case 120,023,252,992 / 1024 / 1024 / 1024 (that's bytes =>
Kilobytes => Megabytes => Gigabytes) is 111.78 Gigabytes as far as the
computer is concerned. (The drive capacity may only show the first 3
digits.)

Neither calculation of the disk size is 'wrong' ...... they are equivalent.

In your case, the drive capacity of 120,000,00,000
bytes (or close to that value) will be referred to by 'My Computer' as 111
Gb
after the above calculation.

Of course, by using the decimal definition drive manufacturers are only
obliged to provide 120,000,000,000 bytes when they claim a drive size of 120
Gb.

Hope that helps
Pete
-------------------------------


"Viv" didn't read the previous responses and asked again
> I have an external hard drive conencted through an
> internal firewire card. This disk is meant to be 120GB
> when I format & partition in within XP ntfs I only get
> 111GB usable. Can anyone please tell me how to
> format/partition it to it's full capacity.
> Thanks Viv
Anonymous
April 3, 2004 9:28:08 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Hi Pete
Thanks for your quick response yes that does help I
thought I had formatted/partitioned it wrong.
>-----Original Message-----
>Hi Viv
>
>Here is the same response that I posted in this thread
earlier. It also
>applies to your query.
>
>You are not missing any space - although the drive
manufacturer could be
>clearer. For drive manufacturers 1,000,000,000 bytes =
1 Gb, whereas an OS
>will regard 1,073,741,824 bytes as 1 Gb. (It's a decimal
V binary thing)
>
>The best way to see this is in XP. With XP installed,
open My Computer,
>select the appropriate
>drive and right-click, select properties...
beside 'capacity' you will see
>the total number of bytes on your disk and to the right
the number of
>Gigabytes.
>
>For example, on my 120 Gb drive I have 120,023,252,992
bytes... which is
>also listed in disk properties as a capacity of 111 Gb.
>
>The Hard Drive manufacturer refers to the 'bytes' total
in my case as 120
>Gb... and, in purely decimal terms, it is -
120,000,000,000 bytes.
>
>The 111 Gb is what the operating system (XP in this
case) 'sees'... because
>the OS
>calculates the storage in binary terms... 1024 bytes as
1 Kb, 1024 Kb as 1
>Mb, and 1024 MB as 1 Gb.....
>
>so in my case 120,023,252,992 / 1024 / 1024 / 1024
(that's bytes =>
>Kilobytes => Megabytes => Gigabytes) is 111.78 Gigabytes
as far as the
>computer is concerned. (The drive capacity may only show
the first 3
>digits.)
>
>Neither calculation of the disk size is 'wrong' ......
they are equivalent.
>
>In your case, the drive capacity of 120,000,00,000
>bytes (or close to that value) will be referred to
by 'My Computer' as 111
>Gb
>after the above calculation.
>
>Of course, by using the decimal definition drive
manufacturers are only
>obliged to provide 120,000,000,000 bytes when they claim
a drive size of 120
>Gb.
>
>Hope that helps
>Pete
>-------------------------------
>
>
>"Viv" didn't read the previous responses and asked again
>> I have an external hard drive conencted through an
>> internal firewire card. This disk is meant to be 120GB
>> when I format & partition in within XP ntfs I only get
>> 111GB usable. Can anyone please tell me how to
>> format/partition it to it's full capacity.
>> Thanks Viv
>
>
>.
>
Anonymous
April 3, 2004 10:44:29 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Glad to help
Pete
---------------------
Viv wrote
> Hi Pete
> Thanks for your quick response yes that does help I
> thought I had formatted/partitioned it wrong.
> >-----Original Message-----
> >Hi Viv
> >
> >Here is the same response that I posted in this thread
> earlier. It also
> >applies to your query.
> >
> >You are not missing any space - although the drive
> manufacturer could be
> >clearer. For drive manufacturers 1,000,000,000 bytes =
> 1 Gb, whereas an OS
> >will regard 1,073,741,824 bytes as 1 Gb. (It's a decimal
> V binary thing)
> >
> >The best way to see this is in XP. With XP installed,
> open My Computer,
> >select the appropriate
> >drive and right-click, select properties...
> beside 'capacity' you will see
> >the total number of bytes on your disk and to the right
> the number of
> >Gigabytes.
> >
> >For example, on my 120 Gb drive I have 120,023,252,992
> bytes... which is
> >also listed in disk properties as a capacity of 111 Gb.
> >
> >The Hard Drive manufacturer refers to the 'bytes' total
> in my case as 120
> >Gb... and, in purely decimal terms, it is -
> 120,000,000,000 bytes.
> >
> >The 111 Gb is what the operating system (XP in this
> case) 'sees'... because
> >the OS
> >calculates the storage in binary terms... 1024 bytes as
> 1 Kb, 1024 Kb as 1
> >Mb, and 1024 MB as 1 Gb.....
> >
> >so in my case 120,023,252,992 / 1024 / 1024 / 1024
> (that's bytes =>
> >Kilobytes => Megabytes => Gigabytes) is 111.78 Gigabytes
> as far as the
> >computer is concerned. (The drive capacity may only show
> the first 3
> >digits.)
> >
> >Neither calculation of the disk size is 'wrong' ......
> they are equivalent.
> >
> >In your case, the drive capacity of 120,000,00,000
> >bytes (or close to that value) will be referred to
> by 'My Computer' as 111
> >Gb
> >after the above calculation.
> >
> >Of course, by using the decimal definition drive
> manufacturers are only
> >obliged to provide 120,000,000,000 bytes when they claim
> a drive size of 120
> >Gb.
> >
> >Hope that helps
> >Pete
> >-------------------------------
> >
> >
> >"Viv" didn't read the previous responses and asked again
> >> I have an external hard drive conencted through an
> >> internal firewire card. This disk is meant to be 120GB
> >> when I format & partition in within XP ntfs I only get
> >> 111GB usable. Can anyone please tell me how to
> >> format/partition it to it's full capacity.
> >> Thanks Viv
!