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Can I migrate programs with a CPU upgrade?

Last response: in Windows 7
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January 12, 2011 6:41:58 AM

I have been running Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit for almost a year now, but I'm about to upgrade my CPU and mobo to a new Sandy Bridge. I'm keeping the same hard-drive. Most of my programs are on a different partition than the OS, and I was planning to just wipe the OS partition and save the others. Is there a way to transfer the install data for these programs so I don't have to reinstall them? Is there any way to do it?

I suppose I could theoretically go into the registry and copy all the software-related segments, but I don't think I know enough to both include and exclude everything that should be included or excluded. Also that's probably not safe or ideal.

There are a few programs on the same partition as Windows, mostly system tools or basic programs, but those will be easy to reinstall.

Any thoughts? Thanks!
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a b $ Windows 7
January 12, 2011 7:39:06 AM

you will have to reinstall the softwares since, besides register entries, there are also files that are installed in the system directories of windows.
January 12, 2011 11:39:23 AM

What was your old hardware configuration?
If it Intel based, make sure your storage settings are the same in new Bios, and you will be able to run your old system. If that wont work, you can find many other solution on migrating your OS to new hardware. (Acronis universal restor/UIU storage drivers settings etc..)
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a c 288 $ Windows 7
January 12, 2011 2:26:20 PM

Your system may work with just the upgrade in place, maybe if you pre-load the drivers for it on the system. If the system does not boot up though, you will need to re-install your applications. Too many times automated programs mess things up (like assigning every file in the system to start with a certain program for example).
January 12, 2011 3:37:18 PM


I'm currently running a Core 2 Duo E 6750 on a P35 chipset.

Are some of you saying that I might be able to build the new system and still boot from the old install?
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a c 288 $ Windows 7
January 12, 2011 4:08:50 PM

laughing-sky said:
I'm currently running a Core 2 Duo E 6750 on a P35 chipset.

Are some of you saying that I might be able to build the new system and still boot from the old install?


Exactly. Really the only issue would be from the hard drive controller. If you get past that, you'll need to provide drivers for the chipset, etc.. but that goes farily smoothly.

If you want to be safe, clone the drive first and try it. If things fail, you can restore the drive on the old mobo and cpu and try something else.

That's a good chip you are replacing though, you sure you want to go trough the possible trouble?
a b $ Windows 7
January 12, 2011 6:33:41 PM

A few months back I went from a Core 2 Duo E 6600 on a Intel DG965RY mb P35 chipset to a Quad core i5 760 on a Gigabyte GA-P55A-UD3 using the original drive.
All I had to do was update the drivers for the mb, otherwise no problems.
I did have to phone Microsoft to reactivate, but that was painless.
January 13, 2011 7:21:58 AM

Just make sure you have the same storage controller settings in bios... (ide/ahci/raid)
You can just use your old hd for testing....nothing will happen to it, and if you have faster drive, just clone your old disk to the new one.
If you want to change storage controller settings in bios it is possible.....but you will have to do something in your Windows first.
link for example: http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/244840-32-convert-sat...
gl

Best solution

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January 13, 2011 4:45:41 PM
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Jonmor68 said:
A few months back I went from a Core 2 Duo E 6600 on a Intel DG965RY mb P35 chipset to a Quad core i5 760 on a Gigabyte GA-P55A-UD3 using the original drive.
All I had to do was update the drivers for the mb, otherwise no problems.
I did have to phone Microsoft to reactivate, but that was painless.
A while back I actually moved from an Athlon 3200+ (single core, not x64) to a C2D E8400 and an old 7600GT to a 8800GTS and as you said, I only had to install the MB drivers. However, I still ended-up reinstalling everything to be on the safe side.

BTW, I don't know if your Windows license is OEM, but if so, it is tied to your MB so you should buy a new one for your new build.
January 31, 2011 4:50:21 AM

Best answer selected by laughing-sky.
January 31, 2011 4:54:03 AM



I ended up back up everything and reinstalling Windows fresh, just to be safe, and have the nice feeling of a clean install. I made a list of all installed programs, so I don't forget anything important, but it's remarkable how many unnecessary things there were.

I did boot into the original install first, just to see if it worked, and everything went smoothly. But the clean slate was calling to me, so I wiped it and started fresh.

Thanks for the tips everyone!
March 17, 2012 1:50:50 AM

arkadi said:
Just make sure you have the same storage controller settings in bios... (ide/ahci/raid)
You can just use your old hd for testing....nothing will happen to it, and if you have faster drive, just clone your old disk to the new one.
If you want to change storage controller settings in bios it is possible.....but you will have to do something in your Windows first.
link for example: http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/244840-32-convert-sat...
gl


Oh, that should be fun. I have 3 hard drives with 3 OS's on them. You have to make sure they're all plugged in to the exact same Sata port and that they are the exact same HDD number. Sometimes the Bios has a mind of it's own. I've even messed up a re-image to the same computer before because I detached one of the drives.
March 17, 2012 2:12:14 AM

Bumped this topic to add a tip: EaseUS ToDo Backup has an option the restore an image to different hardware. You have to use the bootable disk to do this.

With the Free version, just download and install Windows Automated Installation Kit. Then the WinPE bootable disk option will be available. The linux boot disk doesn't do new hardware. They don't tell you this in the online instructions anymore (I suppose they want you to upgrade.) The version I used was 4.0.

I haven't tried this on a new system yet. I'm building one in a few days and will report back.

Another thing: It's best to uninstall all of the drivers related to the old system before backing up the image. (For example, you can uninstall your Intel drivers in device manager and then leave that window open and don't reboot. (Uninstall all other drivers first.) Make your image before Windows detects your Cpu/motherboard again.) -These instructions are from UiU4you.com FAQ.

Also, Windows "shouldn't" have a problem with programs installed outside of program files. Just make sure your partitions have the same drive letters before restoring.
!