RAM and Virtual Memory

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

I have a question about the use of RAM by Windows XP, Home Edition.

I have 256 MB of RAM. Well, I notice that Windows always insists on
using a pagefile, even if RAM is available -- however small. I thought that
virtual RAM was only used when all physical RAM was consumed. Why is
Windows choosing to use a pagefile even when there's physical RAM available?

Also, I would like some advice.

I'm using an old computer. It's an HP Pavilion 8700, which was handed
down to me by my father. There's some hardware changes, and I've installed
a non-OEM version of Windows XP, Home Edition on it. The maximum amount of
RAM my computer can take is 512 MB. (It can take SDRAM, PC100.) I have 256
MB right now. I am somewhat demanding of this computer. I use it for the
Internet and often run multiple programs at the same time, and sometimes
play some demanding games. Do you think that upgrading to 512 MB will show
noticeable performance improvements, within my operating system and within
the programs I run?

I appreciate any responses.

Shane Steinmetz
16 answers Last reply
More about virtual memory
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Virtual Memory in Windows XP
    http://aumha.org/win5/a/xpvm.php

    --
    Carey Frisch
    Microsoft MVP
    Windows XP - Shell/User

    Be Smart! Protect your PC!
    http://www.microsoft.com/security/protect/

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    "Shane Steinmetz" <revieweroftime{REMOVETHIS}@silverinterlocution.org> wrote in message:
    news:ezwIlsNIEHA.2744@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...

    | I have a question about the use of RAM by Windows XP, Home Edition.
    |
    | I have 256 MB of RAM. Well, I notice that Windows always insists on
    | using a pagefile, even if RAM is available -- however small. I thought that
    | virtual RAM was only used when all physical RAM was consumed. Why is
    | Windows choosing to use a pagefile even when there's physical RAM available?
    |
    | Also, I would like some advice.
    |
    | I'm using an old computer. It's an HP Pavilion 8700, which was handed
    | down to me by my father. There's some hardware changes, and I've installed
    | a non-OEM version of Windows XP, Home Edition on it. The maximum amount of
    | RAM my computer can take is 512 MB. (It can take SDRAM, PC100.) I have 256
    | MB right now. I am somewhat demanding of this computer. I use it for the
    | Internet and often run multiple programs at the same time, and sometimes
    | play some demanding games. Do you think that upgrading to 512 MB will show
    | noticeable performance improvements, within my operating system and within
    | the programs I run?
    |
    | I appreciate any responses.
    |
    | Shane Steinmetz
    |
    |
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    The referenced article is WRONG ( http://aumha.org/win5/a/xpvm.php ) in one
    respect, you do NOT need a paging file *if* you have sufficient RAM, period.
    It's just plain wrong in this one respect, and should be rewritten. The
    continued reporting that the paging file is necessary is bogus. NOT if you
    have sufficient RAM! The virtually memory subsystem is always *there* since
    it's an integral part of the OS, but it's implementation in the form of the
    paging file (pagefile.sys normally) may or may not be necessary. It all
    just depends on whether you have enough RAM to make it irrelevant, and thus,
    the paging file *can*, under those circumstances, be deleted.

    More comments below...

    "Shane Steinmetz" <revieweroftime{REMOVETHIS}@silverinterlocution.org> wrote
    in message news:ezwIlsNIEHA.2744@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > I have a question about the use of RAM by Windows XP, Home Edition.
    >
    > I have 256 MB of RAM. Well, I notice that Windows always insists on
    > using a pagefile, even if RAM is available -- however small. I thought
    that
    > virtual RAM was only used when all physical RAM was consumed. Why is
    > Windows choosing to use a pagefile even when there's physical RAM
    available?
    >

    Not exactly correct, it's more a case of Windows always using the VM
    (virtual memory) subsystem, rather than the file itself.

    I have 1GB of RAM and have disabled the paging file completely! And yet,
    Task Manager shows that at least part of the kernal remains "paged".
    Physically, that's impossible, since pagefile.sys doesn't even exist under
    C:\ anymore. That leads me to believe that the way virtual memory usage is
    being calculated is NOT strictly on consumption of the physical paging file,
    but some other factor, something more abstract in the VM. I can't be more
    specific because I don't know exactly what that is, but it has to be
    something else, perhaps memory management reporting the difference between
    *real* vs *potential/delayed* allocations, and throwing the latter into the
    VM (paging file) bucket. Something akin to how applications are loaded,
    i.e., only piece-meal as they are needed.

    > Also, I would like some advice.
    >
    > I'm using an old computer. It's an HP Pavilion 8700, which was handed
    > down to me by my father. There's some hardware changes, and I've
    installed
    > a non-OEM version of Windows XP, Home Edition on it. The maximum amount
    of
    > RAM my computer can take is 512 MB. (It can take SDRAM, PC100.) I have
    256
    > MB right now. I am somewhat demanding of this computer. I use it for the
    > Internet and often run multiple programs at the same time, and sometimes
    > play some demanding games. Do you think that upgrading to 512 MB will
    show
    > noticeable performance improvements, within my operating system and within
    > the programs I run?
    >

    More memory only matters and is useful if you can actually use it. 256MB
    is, frankly, only adequate for XP, I believe 512MB is ideal for the average
    user. If you want to virtually guarantee that the paging file is NOT needed
    and can in fact be disabled, you probably need to reach the 1GB level at a
    minimum, obviously beyond your current capabilities.

    You can easily exceed the 256MB mark w/ a few apps running concurrently, or
    w/ audio/video editing apps, for example. Once you do, you hit the paging
    file, and performance deteriorates rapidily. For most, the pain of
    *waiting* for IO swapping to complete becomes intolerable.

    So monitor your usage, if you rarely if ever come close to 256MB in usage,
    more memory buys you nothing. If you do (and it's highly likely you will),
    more memory is one of the best investments you can make. There's simply no
    comparison in performance between a system that's constantly paging vs. one
    that is not.

    HTH

    Jim

    > I appreciate any responses.
    >
    > Shane Steinmetz
    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Thank you for the reference. It seems to have broadened my insight on the
    subject of virtual RAM a bit.

    So, I guess virtual RAM is a necessity.

    Alright, then. Does anyone have any advice for my current memory
    situation, which I discussed in my first post?

    Shane Steinmetz


    "Carey Frisch [MVP]" <mrxp2004@nospamyahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:eppaJzNIEHA.2656@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
    > Virtual Memory in Windows XP
    > http://aumha.org/win5/a/xpvm.php
    >
    > --
    > Carey Frisch
    > Microsoft MVP
    > Windows XP - Shell/User
    >
    > Be Smart! Protect your PC!
    > http://www.microsoft.com/security/protect/
    >
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------
    -------------------------------------------
    >
    > "Shane Steinmetz" <revieweroftime{REMOVETHIS}@silverinterlocution.org>
    wrote in message:
    > news:ezwIlsNIEHA.2744@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    >
    > | I have a question about the use of RAM by Windows XP, Home Edition.
    > |
    > | I have 256 MB of RAM. Well, I notice that Windows always insists on
    > | using a pagefile, even if RAM is available -- however small. I thought
    that
    > | virtual RAM was only used when all physical RAM was consumed. Why is
    > | Windows choosing to use a pagefile even when there's physical RAM
    available?
    > |
    > | Also, I would like some advice.
    > |
    > | I'm using an old computer. It's an HP Pavilion 8700, which was
    handed
    > | down to me by my father. There's some hardware changes, and I've
    installed
    > | a non-OEM version of Windows XP, Home Edition on it. The maximum amount
    of
    > | RAM my computer can take is 512 MB. (It can take SDRAM, PC100.) I have
    256
    > | MB right now. I am somewhat demanding of this computer. I use it for
    the
    > | Internet and often run multiple programs at the same time, and sometimes
    > | play some demanding games. Do you think that upgrading to 512 MB will
    show
    > | noticeable performance improvements, within my operating system and
    within
    > | the programs I run?
    > |
    > | I appreciate any responses.
    > |
    > | Shane Steinmetz
    > |
    > |
    >
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Try running PhotoShop (extreme changes and mods to the photo) or AutoCad (a
    25 layer - 52 meg drawing, that has to be redrawn due to changes) without a
    pagefile!

    --
    Regards:

    Richard Urban

    aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)

    "Jim" <null@null.com> wrote in message news:o7Fec.597$Yf6.387@fed1read07...
    > The referenced article is WRONG ( http://aumha.org/win5/a/xpvm.php ) in
    > one
    > respect, you do NOT need a paging file *if* you have sufficient RAM,
    > period.
    > It's just plain wrong in this one respect, and should be rewritten. The
    > continued reporting that the paging file is necessary is bogus. NOT if
    > you
    > have sufficient RAM! The virtually memory subsystem is always *there*
    > since
    > it's an integral part of the OS, but it's implementation in the form of
    > the
    > paging file (pagefile.sys normally) may or may not be necessary. It all
    > just depends on whether you have enough RAM to make it irrelevant, and
    > thus,
    > the paging file *can*, under those circumstances, be deleted.
    >
    > More comments below...
    >
    > "Shane Steinmetz" <revieweroftime{REMOVETHIS}@silverinterlocution.org>
    > wrote
    > in message news:ezwIlsNIEHA.2744@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    >> I have a question about the use of RAM by Windows XP, Home Edition.
    >>
    >> I have 256 MB of RAM. Well, I notice that Windows always insists on
    >> using a pagefile, even if RAM is available -- however small. I thought
    > that
    >> virtual RAM was only used when all physical RAM was consumed. Why is
    >> Windows choosing to use a pagefile even when there's physical RAM
    > available?
    >>
    >
    > Not exactly correct, it's more a case of Windows always using the VM
    > (virtual memory) subsystem, rather than the file itself.
    >
    > I have 1GB of RAM and have disabled the paging file completely! And yet,
    > Task Manager shows that at least part of the kernal remains "paged".
    > Physically, that's impossible, since pagefile.sys doesn't even exist under
    > C:\ anymore. That leads me to believe that the way virtual memory usage
    > is
    > being calculated is NOT strictly on consumption of the physical paging
    > file,
    > but some other factor, something more abstract in the VM. I can't be
    > more
    > specific because I don't know exactly what that is, but it has to be
    > something else, perhaps memory management reporting the difference between
    > *real* vs *potential/delayed* allocations, and throwing the latter into
    > the
    > VM (paging file) bucket. Something akin to how applications are loaded,
    > i.e., only piece-meal as they are needed.
    >
    >> Also, I would like some advice.
    >>
    >> I'm using an old computer. It's an HP Pavilion 8700, which was
    >> handed
    >> down to me by my father. There's some hardware changes, and I've
    > installed
    >> a non-OEM version of Windows XP, Home Edition on it. The maximum amount
    > of
    >> RAM my computer can take is 512 MB. (It can take SDRAM, PC100.) I have
    > 256
    >> MB right now. I am somewhat demanding of this computer. I use it for
    >> the
    >> Internet and often run multiple programs at the same time, and sometimes
    >> play some demanding games. Do you think that upgrading to 512 MB will
    > show
    >> noticeable performance improvements, within my operating system and
    >> within
    >> the programs I run?
    >>
    >
    > More memory only matters and is useful if you can actually use it. 256MB
    > is, frankly, only adequate for XP, I believe 512MB is ideal for the
    > average
    > user. If you want to virtually guarantee that the paging file is NOT
    > needed
    > and can in fact be disabled, you probably need to reach the 1GB level at a
    > minimum, obviously beyond your current capabilities.
    >
    > You can easily exceed the 256MB mark w/ a few apps running concurrently,
    > or
    > w/ audio/video editing apps, for example. Once you do, you hit the paging
    > file, and performance deteriorates rapidily. For most, the pain of
    > *waiting* for IO swapping to complete becomes intolerable.
    >
    > So monitor your usage, if you rarely if ever come close to 256MB in usage,
    > more memory buys you nothing. If you do (and it's highly likely you
    > will),
    > more memory is one of the best investments you can make. There's simply
    > no
    > comparison in performance between a system that's constantly paging vs.
    > one
    > that is not.
    >
    > HTH
    >
    > Jim
    >
    >> I appreciate any responses.
    >>
    >> Shane Steinmetz
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Read my post carefully, if you have *sufficient* RAM, you do NOT need a
    paging file! Period!

    If you're running Photoshop and it *needs* more RAM than you have currently
    have installed, then by definition, you do NOT have *sufficient* RAM. I
    choose my words VERY carefully. For many people who do NOT do memory
    intensive applications like audio/video/photo editing, they never exceed the
    available RAM. If they don't, they do not need the paging file!!!

    The document is plain WRONG. I have no such use for memory intensive
    applications, I have 1GB of RAM, and never exceed more than 570MB under the
    worst of conditions. I do not need a paging file, and have indeed, disabled
    it. The system runs perfectly, and has for the past four months.

    If you have *sufficient* RAM, you do NOT need a paging file.

    Jim


    "Richard Urban" <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:%23y%2357kPIEHA.3144@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > Try running PhotoShop (extreme changes and mods to the photo) or AutoCad
    (a
    > 25 layer - 52 meg drawing, that has to be redrawn due to changes) without
    a
    > pagefile!
    >
    > --
    > Regards:
    >
    > Richard Urban
    >
    > aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)
    >
    > "Jim" <null@null.com> wrote in message
    news:o7Fec.597$Yf6.387@fed1read07...
    > > The referenced article is WRONG ( http://aumha.org/win5/a/xpvm.php ) in
    > > one
    > > respect, you do NOT need a paging file *if* you have sufficient RAM,
    > > period.
    > > It's just plain wrong in this one respect, and should be rewritten. The
    > > continued reporting that the paging file is necessary is bogus. NOT if
    > > you
    > > have sufficient RAM! The virtually memory subsystem is always *there*
    > > since
    > > it's an integral part of the OS, but it's implementation in the form of
    > > the
    > > paging file (pagefile.sys normally) may or may not be necessary. It all
    > > just depends on whether you have enough RAM to make it irrelevant, and
    > > thus,
    > > the paging file *can*, under those circumstances, be deleted.
    > >
    > > More comments below...
    > >
    > > "Shane Steinmetz" <revieweroftime{REMOVETHIS}@silverinterlocution.org>
    > > wrote
    > > in message news:ezwIlsNIEHA.2744@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > >> I have a question about the use of RAM by Windows XP, Home Edition.
    > >>
    > >> I have 256 MB of RAM. Well, I notice that Windows always insists
    on
    > >> using a pagefile, even if RAM is available -- however small. I thought
    > > that
    > >> virtual RAM was only used when all physical RAM was consumed. Why is
    > >> Windows choosing to use a pagefile even when there's physical RAM
    > > available?
    > >>
    > >
    > > Not exactly correct, it's more a case of Windows always using the VM
    > > (virtual memory) subsystem, rather than the file itself.
    > >
    > > I have 1GB of RAM and have disabled the paging file completely! And
    yet,
    > > Task Manager shows that at least part of the kernal remains "paged".
    > > Physically, that's impossible, since pagefile.sys doesn't even exist
    under
    > > C:\ anymore. That leads me to believe that the way virtual memory usage
    > > is
    > > being calculated is NOT strictly on consumption of the physical paging
    > > file,
    > > but some other factor, something more abstract in the VM. I can't be
    > > more
    > > specific because I don't know exactly what that is, but it has to be
    > > something else, perhaps memory management reporting the difference
    between
    > > *real* vs *potential/delayed* allocations, and throwing the latter into
    > > the
    > > VM (paging file) bucket. Something akin to how applications are loaded,
    > > i.e., only piece-meal as they are needed.
    > >
    > >> Also, I would like some advice.
    > >>
    > >> I'm using an old computer. It's an HP Pavilion 8700, which was
    > >> handed
    > >> down to me by my father. There's some hardware changes, and I've
    > > installed
    > >> a non-OEM version of Windows XP, Home Edition on it. The maximum
    amount
    > > of
    > >> RAM my computer can take is 512 MB. (It can take SDRAM, PC100.) I
    have
    > > 256
    > >> MB right now. I am somewhat demanding of this computer. I use it for
    > >> the
    > >> Internet and often run multiple programs at the same time, and
    sometimes
    > >> play some demanding games. Do you think that upgrading to 512 MB will
    > > show
    > >> noticeable performance improvements, within my operating system and
    > >> within
    > >> the programs I run?
    > >>
    > >
    > > More memory only matters and is useful if you can actually use it.
    256MB
    > > is, frankly, only adequate for XP, I believe 512MB is ideal for the
    > > average
    > > user. If you want to virtually guarantee that the paging file is NOT
    > > needed
    > > and can in fact be disabled, you probably need to reach the 1GB level at
    a
    > > minimum, obviously beyond your current capabilities.
    > >
    > > You can easily exceed the 256MB mark w/ a few apps running concurrently,
    > > or
    > > w/ audio/video editing apps, for example. Once you do, you hit the
    paging
    > > file, and performance deteriorates rapidily. For most, the pain of
    > > *waiting* for IO swapping to complete becomes intolerable.
    > >
    > > So monitor your usage, if you rarely if ever come close to 256MB in
    usage,
    > > more memory buys you nothing. If you do (and it's highly likely you
    > > will),
    > > more memory is one of the best investments you can make. There's simply
    > > no
    > > comparison in performance between a system that's constantly paging vs.
    > > one
    > > that is not.
    > >
    > > HTH
    > >
    > > Jim
    > >
    > >> I appreciate any responses.
    > >>
    > >> Shane Steinmetz
    > >>
    > >>
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    I have ran without one with no problems sept photohop7 bitched for not
    having a page file. 1Gig ram


    "Jim" <null@null.com> wrote in message news:ROHec.959$Yf6.811@fed1read07...
    > Read my post carefully, if you have *sufficient* RAM, you do NOT need a
    > paging file! Period!
    >
    > If you're running Photoshop and it *needs* more RAM than you have
    currently
    > have installed, then by definition, you do NOT have *sufficient* RAM. I
    > choose my words VERY carefully. For many people who do NOT do memory
    > intensive applications like audio/video/photo editing, they never exceed
    the
    > available RAM. If they don't, they do not need the paging file!!!
    >
    > The document is plain WRONG. I have no such use for memory intensive
    > applications, I have 1GB of RAM, and never exceed more than 570MB under
    the
    > worst of conditions. I do not need a paging file, and have indeed,
    disabled
    > it. The system runs perfectly, and has for the past four months.
    >
    > If you have *sufficient* RAM, you do NOT need a paging file.
    >
    > Jim
    >
    >
    > "Richard Urban" <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:%23y%2357kPIEHA.3144@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > > Try running PhotoShop (extreme changes and mods to the photo) or AutoCad
    > (a
    > > 25 layer - 52 meg drawing, that has to be redrawn due to changes)
    without
    > a
    > > pagefile!
    > >
    > > --
    > > Regards:
    > >
    > > Richard Urban
    > >
    > > aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)
    > >
    > > "Jim" <null@null.com> wrote in message
    > news:o7Fec.597$Yf6.387@fed1read07...
    > > > The referenced article is WRONG ( http://aumha.org/win5/a/xpvm.php )
    in
    > > > one
    > > > respect, you do NOT need a paging file *if* you have sufficient RAM,
    > > > period.
    > > > It's just plain wrong in this one respect, and should be rewritten.
    The
    > > > continued reporting that the paging file is necessary is bogus. NOT
    if
    > > > you
    > > > have sufficient RAM! The virtually memory subsystem is always *there*
    > > > since
    > > > it's an integral part of the OS, but it's implementation in the form
    of
    > > > the
    > > > paging file (pagefile.sys normally) may or may not be necessary. It
    all
    > > > just depends on whether you have enough RAM to make it irrelevant, and
    > > > thus,
    > > > the paging file *can*, under those circumstances, be deleted.
    > > >
    > > > More comments below...
    > > >
    > > > "Shane Steinmetz" <revieweroftime{REMOVETHIS}@silverinterlocution.org>
    > > > wrote
    > > > in message news:ezwIlsNIEHA.2744@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > > >> I have a question about the use of RAM by Windows XP, Home
    Edition.
    > > >>
    > > >> I have 256 MB of RAM. Well, I notice that Windows always insists
    > on
    > > >> using a pagefile, even if RAM is available -- however small. I
    thought
    > > > that
    > > >> virtual RAM was only used when all physical RAM was consumed. Why is
    > > >> Windows choosing to use a pagefile even when there's physical RAM
    > > > available?
    > > >>
    > > >
    > > > Not exactly correct, it's more a case of Windows always using the VM
    > > > (virtual memory) subsystem, rather than the file itself.
    > > >
    > > > I have 1GB of RAM and have disabled the paging file completely! And
    > yet,
    > > > Task Manager shows that at least part of the kernal remains "paged".
    > > > Physically, that's impossible, since pagefile.sys doesn't even exist
    > under
    > > > C:\ anymore. That leads me to believe that the way virtual memory
    usage
    > > > is
    > > > being calculated is NOT strictly on consumption of the physical paging
    > > > file,
    > > > but some other factor, something more abstract in the VM. I can't be
    > > > more
    > > > specific because I don't know exactly what that is, but it has to be
    > > > something else, perhaps memory management reporting the difference
    > between
    > > > *real* vs *potential/delayed* allocations, and throwing the latter
    into
    > > > the
    > > > VM (paging file) bucket. Something akin to how applications are
    loaded,
    > > > i.e., only piece-meal as they are needed.
    > > >
    > > >> Also, I would like some advice.
    > > >>
    > > >> I'm using an old computer. It's an HP Pavilion 8700, which was
    > > >> handed
    > > >> down to me by my father. There's some hardware changes, and I've
    > > > installed
    > > >> a non-OEM version of Windows XP, Home Edition on it. The maximum
    > amount
    > > > of
    > > >> RAM my computer can take is 512 MB. (It can take SDRAM, PC100.) I
    > have
    > > > 256
    > > >> MB right now. I am somewhat demanding of this computer. I use it
    for
    > > >> the
    > > >> Internet and often run multiple programs at the same time, and
    > sometimes
    > > >> play some demanding games. Do you think that upgrading to 512 MB
    will
    > > > show
    > > >> noticeable performance improvements, within my operating system and
    > > >> within
    > > >> the programs I run?
    > > >>
    > > >
    > > > More memory only matters and is useful if you can actually use it.
    > 256MB
    > > > is, frankly, only adequate for XP, I believe 512MB is ideal for the
    > > > average
    > > > user. If you want to virtually guarantee that the paging file is NOT
    > > > needed
    > > > and can in fact be disabled, you probably need to reach the 1GB level
    at
    > a
    > > > minimum, obviously beyond your current capabilities.
    > > >
    > > > You can easily exceed the 256MB mark w/ a few apps running
    concurrently,
    > > > or
    > > > w/ audio/video editing apps, for example. Once you do, you hit the
    > paging
    > > > file, and performance deteriorates rapidily. For most, the pain of
    > > > *waiting* for IO swapping to complete becomes intolerable.
    > > >
    > > > So monitor your usage, if you rarely if ever come close to 256MB in
    > usage,
    > > > more memory buys you nothing. If you do (and it's highly likely you
    > > > will),
    > > > more memory is one of the best investments you can make. There's
    simply
    > > > no
    > > > comparison in performance between a system that's constantly paging
    vs.
    > > > one
    > > > that is not.
    > > >
    > > > HTH
    > > >
    > > > Jim
    > > >
    > > >> I appreciate any responses.
    > > >>
    > > >> Shane Steinmetz
    > > >>
    > > >>
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Ditto.

    I have 3 PCs running XP Pro, 2 have 1 Gig each, and my main P4 has 2Gig. I
    have never used a paging file.

    One PC has been running XP Pro for almost 2 years now, 1Gig, NO page file.

    What's the use. Why slow your PC down when you can run everything in memory.


    "Jim" <null@null.com> wrote in message news:ROHec.959$Yf6.811@fed1read07...
    > Read my post carefully, if you have *sufficient* RAM, you do NOT need a
    > paging file! Period!
    >
    > If you're running Photoshop and it *needs* more RAM than you have
    currently
    > have installed, then by definition, you do NOT have *sufficient* RAM. I
    > choose my words VERY carefully. For many people who do NOT do memory
    > intensive applications like audio/video/photo editing, they never exceed
    the
    > available RAM. If they don't, they do not need the paging file!!!
    >
    > The document is plain WRONG. I have no such use for memory intensive
    > applications, I have 1GB of RAM, and never exceed more than 570MB under
    the
    > worst of conditions. I do not need a paging file, and have indeed,
    disabled
    > it. The system runs perfectly, and has for the past four months.
    >
    > If you have *sufficient* RAM, you do NOT need a paging file.
    >
    > Jim
    >
    >
    > "Richard Urban" <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:%23y%2357kPIEHA.3144@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > > Try running PhotoShop (extreme changes and mods to the photo) or AutoCad
    > (a
    > > 25 layer - 52 meg drawing, that has to be redrawn due to changes)
    without
    > a
    > > pagefile!
    > >
    > > --
    > > Regards:
    > >
    > > Richard Urban
    > >
    > > aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)
    > >
    > > "Jim" <null@null.com> wrote in message
    > news:o7Fec.597$Yf6.387@fed1read07...
    > > > The referenced article is WRONG ( http://aumha.org/win5/a/xpvm.php )
    in
    > > > one
    > > > respect, you do NOT need a paging file *if* you have sufficient RAM,
    > > > period.
    > > > It's just plain wrong in this one respect, and should be rewritten.
    The
    > > > continued reporting that the paging file is necessary is bogus. NOT
    if
    > > > you
    > > > have sufficient RAM! The virtually memory subsystem is always *there*
    > > > since
    > > > it's an integral part of the OS, but it's implementation in the form
    of
    > > > the
    > > > paging file (pagefile.sys normally) may or may not be necessary. It
    all
    > > > just depends on whether you have enough RAM to make it irrelevant, and
    > > > thus,
    > > > the paging file *can*, under those circumstances, be deleted.
    > > >
    > > > More comments below...
    > > >
    > > > "Shane Steinmetz" <revieweroftime{REMOVETHIS}@silverinterlocution.org>
    > > > wrote
    > > > in message news:ezwIlsNIEHA.2744@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > > >> I have a question about the use of RAM by Windows XP, Home
    Edition.
    > > >>
    > > >> I have 256 MB of RAM. Well, I notice that Windows always insists
    > on
    > > >> using a pagefile, even if RAM is available -- however small. I
    thought
    > > > that
    > > >> virtual RAM was only used when all physical RAM was consumed. Why is
    > > >> Windows choosing to use a pagefile even when there's physical RAM
    > > > available?
    > > >>
    > > >
    > > > Not exactly correct, it's more a case of Windows always using the VM
    > > > (virtual memory) subsystem, rather than the file itself.
    > > >
    > > > I have 1GB of RAM and have disabled the paging file completely! And
    > yet,
    > > > Task Manager shows that at least part of the kernal remains "paged".
    > > > Physically, that's impossible, since pagefile.sys doesn't even exist
    > under
    > > > C:\ anymore. That leads me to believe that the way virtual memory
    usage
    > > > is
    > > > being calculated is NOT strictly on consumption of the physical paging
    > > > file,
    > > > but some other factor, something more abstract in the VM. I can't be
    > > > more
    > > > specific because I don't know exactly what that is, but it has to be
    > > > something else, perhaps memory management reporting the difference
    > between
    > > > *real* vs *potential/delayed* allocations, and throwing the latter
    into
    > > > the
    > > > VM (paging file) bucket. Something akin to how applications are
    loaded,
    > > > i.e., only piece-meal as they are needed.
    > > >
    > > >> Also, I would like some advice.
    > > >>
    > > >> I'm using an old computer. It's an HP Pavilion 8700, which was
    > > >> handed
    > > >> down to me by my father. There's some hardware changes, and I've
    > > > installed
    > > >> a non-OEM version of Windows XP, Home Edition on it. The maximum
    > amount
    > > > of
    > > >> RAM my computer can take is 512 MB. (It can take SDRAM, PC100.) I
    > have
    > > > 256
    > > >> MB right now. I am somewhat demanding of this computer. I use it
    for
    > > >> the
    > > >> Internet and often run multiple programs at the same time, and
    > sometimes
    > > >> play some demanding games. Do you think that upgrading to 512 MB
    will
    > > > show
    > > >> noticeable performance improvements, within my operating system and
    > > >> within
    > > >> the programs I run?
    > > >>
    > > >
    > > > More memory only matters and is useful if you can actually use it.
    > 256MB
    > > > is, frankly, only adequate for XP, I believe 512MB is ideal for the
    > > > average
    > > > user. If you want to virtually guarantee that the paging file is NOT
    > > > needed
    > > > and can in fact be disabled, you probably need to reach the 1GB level
    at
    > a
    > > > minimum, obviously beyond your current capabilities.
    > > >
    > > > You can easily exceed the 256MB mark w/ a few apps running
    concurrently,
    > > > or
    > > > w/ audio/video editing apps, for example. Once you do, you hit the
    > paging
    > > > file, and performance deteriorates rapidily. For most, the pain of
    > > > *waiting* for IO swapping to complete becomes intolerable.
    > > >
    > > > So monitor your usage, if you rarely if ever come close to 256MB in
    > usage,
    > > > more memory buys you nothing. If you do (and it's highly likely you
    > > > will),
    > > > more memory is one of the best investments you can make. There's
    simply
    > > > no
    > > > comparison in performance between a system that's constantly paging
    vs.
    > > > one
    > > > that is not.
    > > >
    > > > HTH
    > > >
    > > > Jim
    > > >
    > > >> I appreciate any responses.
    > > >>
    > > >> Shane Steinmetz
    > > >>
    > > >>
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    I guess the person was writing with the presumption that not many people
    stock up highly on RAM. Just how much RAM does the average user have? 256
    MB or less, from what -I've- seen.

    Shane Steinmetz

    "Jim" <null@null.com> wrote in message news:ROHec.959$Yf6.811@fed1read07...
    > Read my post carefully, if you have *sufficient* RAM, you do NOT need a
    > paging file! Period!
    >
    > If you're running Photoshop and it *needs* more RAM than you have
    currently
    > have installed, then by definition, you do NOT have *sufficient* RAM. I
    > choose my words VERY carefully. For many people who do NOT do memory
    > intensive applications like audio/video/photo editing, they never exceed
    the
    > available RAM. If they don't, they do not need the paging file!!!
    >
    > The document is plain WRONG. I have no such use for memory intensive
    > applications, I have 1GB of RAM, and never exceed more than 570MB under
    the
    > worst of conditions. I do not need a paging file, and have indeed,
    disabled
    > it. The system runs perfectly, and has for the past four months.
    >
    > If you have *sufficient* RAM, you do NOT need a paging file.
    >
    > Jim
    >
    >
    > "Richard Urban" <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:%23y%2357kPIEHA.3144@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > > Try running PhotoShop (extreme changes and mods to the photo) or AutoCad
    > (a
    > > 25 layer - 52 meg drawing, that has to be redrawn due to changes)
    without
    > a
    > > pagefile!
    > >
    > > --
    > > Regards:
    > >
    > > Richard Urban
    > >
    > > aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)
    > >
    > > "Jim" <null@null.com> wrote in message
    > news:o7Fec.597$Yf6.387@fed1read07...
    > > > The referenced article is WRONG ( http://aumha.org/win5/a/xpvm.php )
    in
    > > > one
    > > > respect, you do NOT need a paging file *if* you have sufficient RAM,
    > > > period.
    > > > It's just plain wrong in this one respect, and should be rewritten.
    The
    > > > continued reporting that the paging file is necessary is bogus. NOT
    if
    > > > you
    > > > have sufficient RAM! The virtually memory subsystem is always *there*
    > > > since
    > > > it's an integral part of the OS, but it's implementation in the form
    of
    > > > the
    > > > paging file (pagefile.sys normally) may or may not be necessary. It
    all
    > > > just depends on whether you have enough RAM to make it irrelevant, and
    > > > thus,
    > > > the paging file *can*, under those circumstances, be deleted.
    > > >
    > > > More comments below...
    > > >
    > > > "Shane Steinmetz" <revieweroftime{REMOVETHIS}@silverinterlocution.org>
    > > > wrote
    > > > in message news:ezwIlsNIEHA.2744@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > > >> I have a question about the use of RAM by Windows XP, Home
    Edition.
    > > >>
    > > >> I have 256 MB of RAM. Well, I notice that Windows always insists
    > on
    > > >> using a pagefile, even if RAM is available -- however small. I
    thought
    > > > that
    > > >> virtual RAM was only used when all physical RAM was consumed. Why is
    > > >> Windows choosing to use a pagefile even when there's physical RAM
    > > > available?
    > > >>
    > > >
    > > > Not exactly correct, it's more a case of Windows always using the VM
    > > > (virtual memory) subsystem, rather than the file itself.
    > > >
    > > > I have 1GB of RAM and have disabled the paging file completely! And
    > yet,
    > > > Task Manager shows that at least part of the kernal remains "paged".
    > > > Physically, that's impossible, since pagefile.sys doesn't even exist
    > under
    > > > C:\ anymore. That leads me to believe that the way virtual memory
    usage
    > > > is
    > > > being calculated is NOT strictly on consumption of the physical paging
    > > > file,
    > > > but some other factor, something more abstract in the VM. I can't be
    > > > more
    > > > specific because I don't know exactly what that is, but it has to be
    > > > something else, perhaps memory management reporting the difference
    > between
    > > > *real* vs *potential/delayed* allocations, and throwing the latter
    into
    > > > the
    > > > VM (paging file) bucket. Something akin to how applications are
    loaded,
    > > > i.e., only piece-meal as they are needed.
    > > >
    > > >> Also, I would like some advice.
    > > >>
    > > >> I'm using an old computer. It's an HP Pavilion 8700, which was
    > > >> handed
    > > >> down to me by my father. There's some hardware changes, and I've
    > > > installed
    > > >> a non-OEM version of Windows XP, Home Edition on it. The maximum
    > amount
    > > > of
    > > >> RAM my computer can take is 512 MB. (It can take SDRAM, PC100.) I
    > have
    > > > 256
    > > >> MB right now. I am somewhat demanding of this computer. I use it
    for
    > > >> the
    > > >> Internet and often run multiple programs at the same time, and
    > sometimes
    > > >> play some demanding games. Do you think that upgrading to 512 MB
    will
    > > > show
    > > >> noticeable performance improvements, within my operating system and
    > > >> within
    > > >> the programs I run?
    > > >>
    > > >
    > > > More memory only matters and is useful if you can actually use it.
    > 256MB
    > > > is, frankly, only adequate for XP, I believe 512MB is ideal for the
    > > > average
    > > > user. If you want to virtually guarantee that the paging file is NOT
    > > > needed
    > > > and can in fact be disabled, you probably need to reach the 1GB level
    at
    > a
    > > > minimum, obviously beyond your current capabilities.
    > > >
    > > > You can easily exceed the 256MB mark w/ a few apps running
    concurrently,
    > > > or
    > > > w/ audio/video editing apps, for example. Once you do, you hit the
    > paging
    > > > file, and performance deteriorates rapidily. For most, the pain of
    > > > *waiting* for IO swapping to complete becomes intolerable.
    > > >
    > > > So monitor your usage, if you rarely if ever come close to 256MB in
    > usage,
    > > > more memory buys you nothing. If you do (and it's highly likely you
    > > > will),
    > > > more memory is one of the best investments you can make. There's
    simply
    > > > no
    > > > comparison in performance between a system that's constantly paging
    vs.
    > > > one
    > > > that is not.
    > > >
    > > > HTH
    > > >
    > > > Jim
    > > >
    > > >> I appreciate any responses.
    > > >>
    > > >> Shane Steinmetz
    > > >>
    > > >>
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  9. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    RAM access is much faster than hard disk access, so using virtual RAM when
    physical RAM could be used would probably only slow the computer down.

    Shane Steinmetz

    "Sept1967" <sept1967@highstream(remove).net> wrote in message
    news:107mjksjfkg8e42@corp.supernews.com...
    > Ditto.
    >
    > I have 3 PCs running XP Pro, 2 have 1 Gig each, and my main P4 has 2Gig. I
    > have never used a paging file.
    >
    > One PC has been running XP Pro for almost 2 years now, 1Gig, NO page file.
    >
    > What's the use. Why slow your PC down when you can run everything in
    memory.
    >
    >
    > "Jim" <null@null.com> wrote in message
    news:ROHec.959$Yf6.811@fed1read07...
    > > Read my post carefully, if you have *sufficient* RAM, you do NOT need a
    > > paging file! Period!
    > >
    > > If you're running Photoshop and it *needs* more RAM than you have
    > currently
    > > have installed, then by definition, you do NOT have *sufficient* RAM. I
    > > choose my words VERY carefully. For many people who do NOT do memory
    > > intensive applications like audio/video/photo editing, they never exceed
    > the
    > > available RAM. If they don't, they do not need the paging file!!!
    > >
    > > The document is plain WRONG. I have no such use for memory intensive
    > > applications, I have 1GB of RAM, and never exceed more than 570MB under
    > the
    > > worst of conditions. I do not need a paging file, and have indeed,
    > disabled
    > > it. The system runs perfectly, and has for the past four months.
    > >
    > > If you have *sufficient* RAM, you do NOT need a paging file.
    > >
    > > Jim
    > >
    > >
    > > "Richard Urban" <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > > news:%23y%2357kPIEHA.3144@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > > > Try running PhotoShop (extreme changes and mods to the photo) or
    AutoCad
    > > (a
    > > > 25 layer - 52 meg drawing, that has to be redrawn due to changes)
    > without
    > > a
    > > > pagefile!
    > > >
    > > > --
    > > > Regards:
    > > >
    > > > Richard Urban
    > > >
    > > > aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)
    > > >
    > > > "Jim" <null@null.com> wrote in message
    > > news:o7Fec.597$Yf6.387@fed1read07...
    > > > > The referenced article is WRONG ( http://aumha.org/win5/a/xpvm.php )
    > in
    > > > > one
    > > > > respect, you do NOT need a paging file *if* you have sufficient RAM,
    > > > > period.
    > > > > It's just plain wrong in this one respect, and should be rewritten.
    > The
    > > > > continued reporting that the paging file is necessary is bogus. NOT
    > if
    > > > > you
    > > > > have sufficient RAM! The virtually memory subsystem is always
    *there*
    > > > > since
    > > > > it's an integral part of the OS, but it's implementation in the form
    > of
    > > > > the
    > > > > paging file (pagefile.sys normally) may or may not be necessary. It
    > all
    > > > > just depends on whether you have enough RAM to make it irrelevant,
    and
    > > > > thus,
    > > > > the paging file *can*, under those circumstances, be deleted.
    > > > >
    > > > > More comments below...
    > > > >
    > > > > "Shane Steinmetz"
    <revieweroftime{REMOVETHIS}@silverinterlocution.org>
    > > > > wrote
    > > > > in message news:ezwIlsNIEHA.2744@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > > > >> I have a question about the use of RAM by Windows XP, Home
    > Edition.
    > > > >>
    > > > >> I have 256 MB of RAM. Well, I notice that Windows always
    insists
    > > on
    > > > >> using a pagefile, even if RAM is available -- however small. I
    > thought
    > > > > that
    > > > >> virtual RAM was only used when all physical RAM was consumed. Why
    is
    > > > >> Windows choosing to use a pagefile even when there's physical RAM
    > > > > available?
    > > > >>
    > > > >
    > > > > Not exactly correct, it's more a case of Windows always using the VM
    > > > > (virtual memory) subsystem, rather than the file itself.
    > > > >
    > > > > I have 1GB of RAM and have disabled the paging file completely! And
    > > yet,
    > > > > Task Manager shows that at least part of the kernal remains "paged".
    > > > > Physically, that's impossible, since pagefile.sys doesn't even exist
    > > under
    > > > > C:\ anymore. That leads me to believe that the way virtual memory
    > usage
    > > > > is
    > > > > being calculated is NOT strictly on consumption of the physical
    paging
    > > > > file,
    > > > > but some other factor, something more abstract in the VM. I can't
    be
    > > > > more
    > > > > specific because I don't know exactly what that is, but it has to be
    > > > > something else, perhaps memory management reporting the difference
    > > between
    > > > > *real* vs *potential/delayed* allocations, and throwing the latter
    > into
    > > > > the
    > > > > VM (paging file) bucket. Something akin to how applications are
    > loaded,
    > > > > i.e., only piece-meal as they are needed.
    > > > >
    > > > >> Also, I would like some advice.
    > > > >>
    > > > >> I'm using an old computer. It's an HP Pavilion 8700, which was
    > > > >> handed
    > > > >> down to me by my father. There's some hardware changes, and I've
    > > > > installed
    > > > >> a non-OEM version of Windows XP, Home Edition on it. The maximum
    > > amount
    > > > > of
    > > > >> RAM my computer can take is 512 MB. (It can take SDRAM, PC100.) I
    > > have
    > > > > 256
    > > > >> MB right now. I am somewhat demanding of this computer. I use it
    > for
    > > > >> the
    > > > >> Internet and often run multiple programs at the same time, and
    > > sometimes
    > > > >> play some demanding games. Do you think that upgrading to 512 MB
    > will
    > > > > show
    > > > >> noticeable performance improvements, within my operating system and
    > > > >> within
    > > > >> the programs I run?
    > > > >>
    > > > >
    > > > > More memory only matters and is useful if you can actually use it.
    > > 256MB
    > > > > is, frankly, only adequate for XP, I believe 512MB is ideal for the
    > > > > average
    > > > > user. If you want to virtually guarantee that the paging file is
    NOT
    > > > > needed
    > > > > and can in fact be disabled, you probably need to reach the 1GB
    level
    > at
    > > a
    > > > > minimum, obviously beyond your current capabilities.
    > > > >
    > > > > You can easily exceed the 256MB mark w/ a few apps running
    > concurrently,
    > > > > or
    > > > > w/ audio/video editing apps, for example. Once you do, you hit the
    > > paging
    > > > > file, and performance deteriorates rapidily. For most, the pain of
    > > > > *waiting* for IO swapping to complete becomes intolerable.
    > > > >
    > > > > So monitor your usage, if you rarely if ever come close to 256MB in
    > > usage,
    > > > > more memory buys you nothing. If you do (and it's highly likely you
    > > > > will),
    > > > > more memory is one of the best investments you can make. There's
    > simply
    > > > > no
    > > > > comparison in performance between a system that's constantly paging
    > vs.
    > > > > one
    > > > > that is not.
    > > > >
    > > > > HTH
    > > > >
    > > > > Jim
    > > > >
    > > > >> I appreciate any responses.
    > > > >>
    > > > >> Shane Steinmetz
    > > > >>
    > > > >>
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  10. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Wow. The program actually told you that you needed to having a paging file?

    Shane Steinmetz

    "Nick Burns" <thedoc@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:O$4qE2PIEHA.3848@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    > I have ran without one with no problems sept photohop7 bitched for not
    > having a page file. 1Gig ram
    >
    >
    > "Jim" <null@null.com> wrote in message
    news:ROHec.959$Yf6.811@fed1read07...
    > > Read my post carefully, if you have *sufficient* RAM, you do NOT need a
    > > paging file! Period!
    > >
    > > If you're running Photoshop and it *needs* more RAM than you have
    > currently
    > > have installed, then by definition, you do NOT have *sufficient* RAM. I
    > > choose my words VERY carefully. For many people who do NOT do memory
    > > intensive applications like audio/video/photo editing, they never exceed
    > the
    > > available RAM. If they don't, they do not need the paging file!!!
    > >
    > > The document is plain WRONG. I have no such use for memory intensive
    > > applications, I have 1GB of RAM, and never exceed more than 570MB under
    > the
    > > worst of conditions. I do not need a paging file, and have indeed,
    > disabled
    > > it. The system runs perfectly, and has for the past four months.
    > >
    > > If you have *sufficient* RAM, you do NOT need a paging file.
    > >
    > > Jim
    > >
    > >
    > > "Richard Urban" <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > > news:%23y%2357kPIEHA.3144@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > > > Try running PhotoShop (extreme changes and mods to the photo) or
    AutoCad
    > > (a
    > > > 25 layer - 52 meg drawing, that has to be redrawn due to changes)
    > without
    > > a
    > > > pagefile!
    > > >
    > > > --
    > > > Regards:
    > > >
    > > > Richard Urban
    > > >
    > > > aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)
    > > >
    > > > "Jim" <null@null.com> wrote in message
    > > news:o7Fec.597$Yf6.387@fed1read07...
    > > > > The referenced article is WRONG ( http://aumha.org/win5/a/xpvm.php )
    > in
    > > > > one
    > > > > respect, you do NOT need a paging file *if* you have sufficient RAM,
    > > > > period.
    > > > > It's just plain wrong in this one respect, and should be rewritten.
    > The
    > > > > continued reporting that the paging file is necessary is bogus. NOT
    > if
    > > > > you
    > > > > have sufficient RAM! The virtually memory subsystem is always
    *there*
    > > > > since
    > > > > it's an integral part of the OS, but it's implementation in the form
    > of
    > > > > the
    > > > > paging file (pagefile.sys normally) may or may not be necessary. It
    > all
    > > > > just depends on whether you have enough RAM to make it irrelevant,
    and
    > > > > thus,
    > > > > the paging file *can*, under those circumstances, be deleted.
    > > > >
    > > > > More comments below...
    > > > >
    > > > > "Shane Steinmetz"
    <revieweroftime{REMOVETHIS}@silverinterlocution.org>
    > > > > wrote
    > > > > in message news:ezwIlsNIEHA.2744@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > > > >> I have a question about the use of RAM by Windows XP, Home
    > Edition.
    > > > >>
    > > > >> I have 256 MB of RAM. Well, I notice that Windows always
    insists
    > > on
    > > > >> using a pagefile, even if RAM is available -- however small. I
    > thought
    > > > > that
    > > > >> virtual RAM was only used when all physical RAM was consumed. Why
    is
    > > > >> Windows choosing to use a pagefile even when there's physical RAM
    > > > > available?
    > > > >>
    > > > >
    > > > > Not exactly correct, it's more a case of Windows always using the VM
    > > > > (virtual memory) subsystem, rather than the file itself.
    > > > >
    > > > > I have 1GB of RAM and have disabled the paging file completely! And
    > > yet,
    > > > > Task Manager shows that at least part of the kernal remains "paged".
    > > > > Physically, that's impossible, since pagefile.sys doesn't even exist
    > > under
    > > > > C:\ anymore. That leads me to believe that the way virtual memory
    > usage
    > > > > is
    > > > > being calculated is NOT strictly on consumption of the physical
    paging
    > > > > file,
    > > > > but some other factor, something more abstract in the VM. I can't
    be
    > > > > more
    > > > > specific because I don't know exactly what that is, but it has to be
    > > > > something else, perhaps memory management reporting the difference
    > > between
    > > > > *real* vs *potential/delayed* allocations, and throwing the latter
    > into
    > > > > the
    > > > > VM (paging file) bucket. Something akin to how applications are
    > loaded,
    > > > > i.e., only piece-meal as they are needed.
    > > > >
    > > > >> Also, I would like some advice.
    > > > >>
    > > > >> I'm using an old computer. It's an HP Pavilion 8700, which was
    > > > >> handed
    > > > >> down to me by my father. There's some hardware changes, and I've
    > > > > installed
    > > > >> a non-OEM version of Windows XP, Home Edition on it. The maximum
    > > amount
    > > > > of
    > > > >> RAM my computer can take is 512 MB. (It can take SDRAM, PC100.) I
    > > have
    > > > > 256
    > > > >> MB right now. I am somewhat demanding of this computer. I use it
    > for
    > > > >> the
    > > > >> Internet and often run multiple programs at the same time, and
    > > sometimes
    > > > >> play some demanding games. Do you think that upgrading to 512 MB
    > will
    > > > > show
    > > > >> noticeable performance improvements, within my operating system and
    > > > >> within
    > > > >> the programs I run?
    > > > >>
    > > > >
    > > > > More memory only matters and is useful if you can actually use it.
    > > 256MB
    > > > > is, frankly, only adequate for XP, I believe 512MB is ideal for the
    > > > > average
    > > > > user. If you want to virtually guarantee that the paging file is
    NOT
    > > > > needed
    > > > > and can in fact be disabled, you probably need to reach the 1GB
    level
    > at
    > > a
    > > > > minimum, obviously beyond your current capabilities.
    > > > >
    > > > > You can easily exceed the 256MB mark w/ a few apps running
    > concurrently,
    > > > > or
    > > > > w/ audio/video editing apps, for example. Once you do, you hit the
    > > paging
    > > > > file, and performance deteriorates rapidily. For most, the pain of
    > > > > *waiting* for IO swapping to complete becomes intolerable.
    > > > >
    > > > > So monitor your usage, if you rarely if ever come close to 256MB in
    > > usage,
    > > > > more memory buys you nothing. If you do (and it's highly likely you
    > > > > will),
    > > > > more memory is one of the best investments you can make. There's
    > simply
    > > > > no
    > > > > comparison in performance between a system that's constantly paging
    > vs.
    > > > > one
    > > > > that is not.
    > > > >
    > > > > HTH
    > > > >
    > > > > Jim
    > > > >
    > > > >> I appreciate any responses.
    > > > >>
    > > > >> Shane Steinmetz
    > > > >>
    > > > >>
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  11. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Yes, a great example of "not getting it".

    Photoshop has no business looking at the paging file. The virtual memory
    subsystem is suppose to be *hidden* from applications, indeed, it's even
    worse in this case, Photoshop is actually looking for the *implementation*
    (in the form of pagefile.sys)!

    The application has no business delving into the VM or its implementation.
    It should only be inquiring the OS about available memory. In response, the
    OS should be calculating the available memory as RAM + VM (potential), or
    whatever else Windows decides to use to emulate memory, perhaps NOTHING. If
    the paging file is disabled, then naturally the result of RAM + VM = RAM.
    That's *all* Photoshop or any other application need concern itself about.
    If the call to return available memory is reported, for example, as 1GB, and
    Photoshop doesn't like it, fine, it can scream its head off. If the OS
    reports 16GB (4GB RAM + 12GB of *potential* maximum VM), and Photoshop
    *still* doesn't like, it can scream it's head off, AGAIN. In the end, if
    Photoshop is not happy, then it should inform the user there is insufficient
    memory (not complain about the lack of a paging file). It might then
    *suggest* (ONE TIME!) increasing RAM and/or offer additional information
    that Windows can extend *physical* RAM through the VM subsystem and perhaps
    provide some guidance how to achieve this through references to Windows
    help.

    Btw, it's not as if using VM that memory can't be exhausted! Suppose the
    maximum limits on VM (pagefile.sys expansion) are still too low?! Photoshop
    is still wrong, it would be much better off consulting the OS which will
    then consider the true potential for expansion, NOT just the mere presensce
    and/or current allocation of pagefile.sys. So now the application whines
    ceaselessly because it's has foolishly built in a dependence on the memory
    system implementation. Incredibly dumb, this is programming 101 stuff.

    Jim


    "Shane Steinmetz" <revieweroftime{REMOVETHIS}@silverinterlocution.org> wrote
    in message news:%23OJXr1QIEHA.2844@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    > Wow. The program actually told you that you needed to having a paging
    file?
    >
    > Shane Steinmetz
    >
    > "Nick Burns" <thedoc@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:O$4qE2PIEHA.3848@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    > > I have ran without one with no problems sept photohop7 bitched for not
    > > having a page file. 1Gig ram
    > >
    > >
    > > "Jim" <null@null.com> wrote in message
    > news:ROHec.959$Yf6.811@fed1read07...
    > > > Read my post carefully, if you have *sufficient* RAM, you do NOT need
    a
    > > > paging file! Period!
    > > >
    > > > If you're running Photoshop and it *needs* more RAM than you have
    > > currently
    > > > have installed, then by definition, you do NOT have *sufficient* RAM.
    I
    > > > choose my words VERY carefully. For many people who do NOT do memory
    > > > intensive applications like audio/video/photo editing, they never
    exceed
    > > the
    > > > available RAM. If they don't, they do not need the paging file!!!
    > > >
    > > > The document is plain WRONG. I have no such use for memory intensive
    > > > applications, I have 1GB of RAM, and never exceed more than 570MB
    under
    > > the
    > > > worst of conditions. I do not need a paging file, and have indeed,
    > > disabled
    > > > it. The system runs perfectly, and has for the past four months.
    > > >
    > > > If you have *sufficient* RAM, you do NOT need a paging file.
    > > >
    > > > Jim
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > "Richard Urban" <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > > > news:%23y%2357kPIEHA.3144@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > > > > Try running PhotoShop (extreme changes and mods to the photo) or
    > AutoCad
    > > > (a
    > > > > 25 layer - 52 meg drawing, that has to be redrawn due to changes)
    > > without
    > > > a
    > > > > pagefile!
    > > > >
    > > > > --
    > > > > Regards:
    > > > >
    > > > > Richard Urban
    > > > >
    > > > > aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)
    > > > >
    > > > > "Jim" <null@null.com> wrote in message
    > > > news:o7Fec.597$Yf6.387@fed1read07...
    > > > > > The referenced article is WRONG (
    http://aumha.org/win5/a/xpvm.php )
    > > in
    > > > > > one
    > > > > > respect, you do NOT need a paging file *if* you have sufficient
    RAM,
    > > > > > period.
    > > > > > It's just plain wrong in this one respect, and should be
    rewritten.
    > > The
    > > > > > continued reporting that the paging file is necessary is bogus.
    NOT
    > > if
    > > > > > you
    > > > > > have sufficient RAM! The virtually memory subsystem is always
    > *there*
    > > > > > since
    > > > > > it's an integral part of the OS, but it's implementation in the
    form
    > > of
    > > > > > the
    > > > > > paging file (pagefile.sys normally) may or may not be necessary.
    It
    > > all
    > > > > > just depends on whether you have enough RAM to make it irrelevant,
    > and
    > > > > > thus,
    > > > > > the paging file *can*, under those circumstances, be deleted.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > More comments below...
    > > > > >
    > > > > > "Shane Steinmetz"
    > <revieweroftime{REMOVETHIS}@silverinterlocution.org>
    > > > > > wrote
    > > > > > in message news:ezwIlsNIEHA.2744@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > > > > >> I have a question about the use of RAM by Windows XP, Home
    > > Edition.
    > > > > >>
    > > > > >> I have 256 MB of RAM. Well, I notice that Windows always
    > insists
    > > > on
    > > > > >> using a pagefile, even if RAM is available -- however small. I
    > > thought
    > > > > > that
    > > > > >> virtual RAM was only used when all physical RAM was consumed.
    Why
    > is
    > > > > >> Windows choosing to use a pagefile even when there's physical RAM
    > > > > > available?
    > > > > >>
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Not exactly correct, it's more a case of Windows always using the
    VM
    > > > > > (virtual memory) subsystem, rather than the file itself.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > I have 1GB of RAM and have disabled the paging file completely!
    And
    > > > yet,
    > > > > > Task Manager shows that at least part of the kernal remains
    "paged".
    > > > > > Physically, that's impossible, since pagefile.sys doesn't even
    exist
    > > > under
    > > > > > C:\ anymore. That leads me to believe that the way virtual memory
    > > usage
    > > > > > is
    > > > > > being calculated is NOT strictly on consumption of the physical
    > paging
    > > > > > file,
    > > > > > but some other factor, something more abstract in the VM. I
    can't
    > be
    > > > > > more
    > > > > > specific because I don't know exactly what that is, but it has to
    be
    > > > > > something else, perhaps memory management reporting the difference
    > > > between
    > > > > > *real* vs *potential/delayed* allocations, and throwing the latter
    > > into
    > > > > > the
    > > > > > VM (paging file) bucket. Something akin to how applications are
    > > loaded,
    > > > > > i.e., only piece-meal as they are needed.
    > > > > >
    > > > > >> Also, I would like some advice.
    > > > > >>
    > > > > >> I'm using an old computer. It's an HP Pavilion 8700, which
    was
    > > > > >> handed
    > > > > >> down to me by my father. There's some hardware changes, and I've
    > > > > > installed
    > > > > >> a non-OEM version of Windows XP, Home Edition on it. The maximum
    > > > amount
    > > > > > of
    > > > > >> RAM my computer can take is 512 MB. (It can take SDRAM, PC100.)
    I
    > > > have
    > > > > > 256
    > > > > >> MB right now. I am somewhat demanding of this computer. I use
    it
    > > for
    > > > > >> the
    > > > > >> Internet and often run multiple programs at the same time, and
    > > > sometimes
    > > > > >> play some demanding games. Do you think that upgrading to 512 MB
    > > will
    > > > > > show
    > > > > >> noticeable performance improvements, within my operating system
    and
    > > > > >> within
    > > > > >> the programs I run?
    > > > > >>
    > > > > >
    > > > > > More memory only matters and is useful if you can actually use it.
    > > > 256MB
    > > > > > is, frankly, only adequate for XP, I believe 512MB is ideal for
    the
    > > > > > average
    > > > > > user. If you want to virtually guarantee that the paging file is
    > NOT
    > > > > > needed
    > > > > > and can in fact be disabled, you probably need to reach the 1GB
    > level
    > > at
    > > > a
    > > > > > minimum, obviously beyond your current capabilities.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > You can easily exceed the 256MB mark w/ a few apps running
    > > concurrently,
    > > > > > or
    > > > > > w/ audio/video editing apps, for example. Once you do, you hit
    the
    > > > paging
    > > > > > file, and performance deteriorates rapidily. For most, the pain
    of
    > > > > > *waiting* for IO swapping to complete becomes intolerable.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > So monitor your usage, if you rarely if ever come close to 256MB
    in
    > > > usage,
    > > > > > more memory buys you nothing. If you do (and it's highly likely
    you
    > > > > > will),
    > > > > > more memory is one of the best investments you can make. There's
    > > simply
    > > > > > no
    > > > > > comparison in performance between a system that's constantly
    paging
    > > vs.
    > > > > > one
    > > > > > that is not.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > HTH
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Jim
    > > > > >
    > > > > >> I appreciate any responses.
    > > > > >>
    > > > > >> Shane Steinmetz
    > > > > >>
    > > > > >>
    > > > > >
    > > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  12. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    I do forget the error, but Adobe told me it was from no page file. Turned it
    back on and error went away. That was the only problem I encountered.


    "Shane Steinmetz" <revieweroftime{REMOVETHIS}@silverinterlocution.org> wrote
    in message news:%23OJXr1QIEHA.2844@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    > Wow. The program actually told you that you needed to having a paging
    file?
    >
    > Shane Steinmetz
    >
    > "Nick Burns" <thedoc@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:O$4qE2PIEHA.3848@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    > > I have ran without one with no problems sept photohop7 bitched for not
    > > having a page file. 1Gig ram
    > >
    > >
    > > "Jim" <null@null.com> wrote in message
    > news:ROHec.959$Yf6.811@fed1read07...
    > > > Read my post carefully, if you have *sufficient* RAM, you do NOT need
    a
    > > > paging file! Period!
    > > >
    > > > If you're running Photoshop and it *needs* more RAM than you have
    > > currently
    > > > have installed, then by definition, you do NOT have *sufficient* RAM.
    I
    > > > choose my words VERY carefully. For many people who do NOT do memory
    > > > intensive applications like audio/video/photo editing, they never
    exceed
    > > the
    > > > available RAM. If they don't, they do not need the paging file!!!
    > > >
    > > > The document is plain WRONG. I have no such use for memory intensive
    > > > applications, I have 1GB of RAM, and never exceed more than 570MB
    under
    > > the
    > > > worst of conditions. I do not need a paging file, and have indeed,
    > > disabled
    > > > it. The system runs perfectly, and has for the past four months.
    > > >
    > > > If you have *sufficient* RAM, you do NOT need a paging file.
    > > >
    > > > Jim
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > "Richard Urban" <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > > > news:%23y%2357kPIEHA.3144@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > > > > Try running PhotoShop (extreme changes and mods to the photo) or
    > AutoCad
    > > > (a
    > > > > 25 layer - 52 meg drawing, that has to be redrawn due to changes)
    > > without
    > > > a
    > > > > pagefile!
    > > > >
    > > > > --
    > > > > Regards:
    > > > >
    > > > > Richard Urban
    > > > >
    > > > > aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)
    > > > >
    > > > > "Jim" <null@null.com> wrote in message
    > > > news:o7Fec.597$Yf6.387@fed1read07...
    > > > > > The referenced article is WRONG (
    http://aumha.org/win5/a/xpvm.php )
    > > in
    > > > > > one
    > > > > > respect, you do NOT need a paging file *if* you have sufficient
    RAM,
    > > > > > period.
    > > > > > It's just plain wrong in this one respect, and should be
    rewritten.
    > > The
    > > > > > continued reporting that the paging file is necessary is bogus.
    NOT
    > > if
    > > > > > you
    > > > > > have sufficient RAM! The virtually memory subsystem is always
    > *there*
    > > > > > since
    > > > > > it's an integral part of the OS, but it's implementation in the
    form
    > > of
    > > > > > the
    > > > > > paging file (pagefile.sys normally) may or may not be necessary.
    It
    > > all
    > > > > > just depends on whether you have enough RAM to make it irrelevant,
    > and
    > > > > > thus,
    > > > > > the paging file *can*, under those circumstances, be deleted.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > More comments below...
    > > > > >
    > > > > > "Shane Steinmetz"
    > <revieweroftime{REMOVETHIS}@silverinterlocution.org>
    > > > > > wrote
    > > > > > in message news:ezwIlsNIEHA.2744@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > > > > >> I have a question about the use of RAM by Windows XP, Home
    > > Edition.
    > > > > >>
    > > > > >> I have 256 MB of RAM. Well, I notice that Windows always
    > insists
    > > > on
    > > > > >> using a pagefile, even if RAM is available -- however small. I
    > > thought
    > > > > > that
    > > > > >> virtual RAM was only used when all physical RAM was consumed.
    Why
    > is
    > > > > >> Windows choosing to use a pagefile even when there's physical RAM
    > > > > > available?
    > > > > >>
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Not exactly correct, it's more a case of Windows always using the
    VM
    > > > > > (virtual memory) subsystem, rather than the file itself.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > I have 1GB of RAM and have disabled the paging file completely!
    And
    > > > yet,
    > > > > > Task Manager shows that at least part of the kernal remains
    "paged".
    > > > > > Physically, that's impossible, since pagefile.sys doesn't even
    exist
    > > > under
    > > > > > C:\ anymore. That leads me to believe that the way virtual memory
    > > usage
    > > > > > is
    > > > > > being calculated is NOT strictly on consumption of the physical
    > paging
    > > > > > file,
    > > > > > but some other factor, something more abstract in the VM. I
    can't
    > be
    > > > > > more
    > > > > > specific because I don't know exactly what that is, but it has to
    be
    > > > > > something else, perhaps memory management reporting the difference
    > > > between
    > > > > > *real* vs *potential/delayed* allocations, and throwing the latter
    > > into
    > > > > > the
    > > > > > VM (paging file) bucket. Something akin to how applications are
    > > loaded,
    > > > > > i.e., only piece-meal as they are needed.
    > > > > >
    > > > > >> Also, I would like some advice.
    > > > > >>
    > > > > >> I'm using an old computer. It's an HP Pavilion 8700, which
    was
    > > > > >> handed
    > > > > >> down to me by my father. There's some hardware changes, and I've
    > > > > > installed
    > > > > >> a non-OEM version of Windows XP, Home Edition on it. The maximum
    > > > amount
    > > > > > of
    > > > > >> RAM my computer can take is 512 MB. (It can take SDRAM, PC100.)
    I
    > > > have
    > > > > > 256
    > > > > >> MB right now. I am somewhat demanding of this computer. I use
    it
    > > for
    > > > > >> the
    > > > > >> Internet and often run multiple programs at the same time, and
    > > > sometimes
    > > > > >> play some demanding games. Do you think that upgrading to 512 MB
    > > will
    > > > > > show
    > > > > >> noticeable performance improvements, within my operating system
    and
    > > > > >> within
    > > > > >> the programs I run?
    > > > > >>
    > > > > >
    > > > > > More memory only matters and is useful if you can actually use it.
    > > > 256MB
    > > > > > is, frankly, only adequate for XP, I believe 512MB is ideal for
    the
    > > > > > average
    > > > > > user. If you want to virtually guarantee that the paging file is
    > NOT
    > > > > > needed
    > > > > > and can in fact be disabled, you probably need to reach the 1GB
    > level
    > > at
    > > > a
    > > > > > minimum, obviously beyond your current capabilities.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > You can easily exceed the 256MB mark w/ a few apps running
    > > concurrently,
    > > > > > or
    > > > > > w/ audio/video editing apps, for example. Once you do, you hit
    the
    > > > paging
    > > > > > file, and performance deteriorates rapidily. For most, the pain
    of
    > > > > > *waiting* for IO swapping to complete becomes intolerable.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > So monitor your usage, if you rarely if ever come close to 256MB
    in
    > > > usage,
    > > > > > more memory buys you nothing. If you do (and it's highly likely
    you
    > > > > > will),
    > > > > > more memory is one of the best investments you can make. There's
    > > simply
    > > > > > no
    > > > > > comparison in performance between a system that's constantly
    paging
    > > vs.
    > > > > > one
    > > > > > that is not.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > HTH
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Jim
    > > > > >
    > > > > >> I appreciate any responses.
    > > > > >>
    > > > > >> Shane Steinmetz
    > > > > >>
    > > > > >>
    > > > > >
    > > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  13. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    "Jim" <null@null.com> wrote:

    >The referenced article is WRONG ( http://aumha.org/win5/a/xpvm.php ) in one
    >respect, you do NOT need a paging file *if* you have sufficient RAM, period.

    That is wrong.

    You may not need a paging file if you have an *excessive* amount of
    RAM; enough so that you can afford to waste a portion of that RAM
    satisfying the memory address space requirements of the *unused*
    portions of memory allocation requests. These unused portions can
    easily aggregate to several hundred megabytes on a heavily used
    system.

    And in order to run without a paging file you *must* also accept that
    fast user switching will not be available (the paging file is used to
    roll out the RAM contents of previous users) and also *must* accept
    that system failure memory dumps will not be available because these
    are saved to the paging file on the boot drive, which is then renamed.


    Ron Martell Duncan B.C. Canada
    --
    Microsoft MVP
    On-Line Help Computer Service
    http://onlinehelp.bc.ca

    "The reason computer chips are so small is computers don't eat much."
  14. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    "Shane Steinmetz" <revieweroftime{REMOVETHIS}@silverinterlocution.org>
    wrote:

    >RAM access is much faster than hard disk access, so using virtual RAM when
    >physical RAM could be used would probably only slow the computer down.

    Windows will not actually use the paging file - that is it will not
    move active memory pages from RAM to the paging file - while there is
    still unused RAM available.

    What it will do is to use the space in the paging file to satisfy the
    memory address space requirements of the *unused* portion of memory
    allocation requests thereby allowing RAM to be used only for those
    portions that are actually used.


    Ron Martell Duncan B.C. Canada
    --
    Microsoft MVP
    On-Line Help Computer Service
    http://onlinehelp.bc.ca

    "The reason computer chips are so small is computers don't eat much."
  15. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    On Mon, 12 Apr 2004 15:55:49 -0700, "Jim" <null@null.com> wrote:
    >"Shane Steinmetz" <revieweroftime{REMOVETHIS}@silverinterlocution.org> wrote

    >I have 1GB of RAM and have disabled the paging file completely! And yet,
    >Task Manager shows that at least part of the kernal remains "paged".
    >Physically, that's impossible, since pagefile.sys doesn't even exist

    Not really; it may be that parts of the kernel are paged out. They
    don't have to paged out to disk, given that the original content
    hasn't changed and can thus be paged in directly from the files that
    the code was originally loaded from in the first place.

    >> I'm using an old computer. It's an HP Pavilion 8700, which was handed
    >> down to me by my father. There's some hardware changes, and I've
    >> installedWindows XP, Home Edition on it. The maximum amount of
    >> RAM my computer can take is 512 MB. (It can take SDRAM, PC100.)

    What's the rest of the PC's spec?

    >> I have 256M right now. I am somewhat demanding of this computer.
    >> Do you think that upgrading to 512 MB will show noticeable performance
    >> improvements, within my operating system and within the programs I run?

    It may do; hard to say, given we don't know what your load is.

    >More memory only matters and is useful if you can actually use it. 256MB
    >is, frankly, only adequate for XP,

    128M works OK too :-)

    But if you want to run apps as well as the OS, well...

    >I believe 512MB is ideal for the average user.

    512M's nice. Right now I build with 256M or 512M, but with no less
    than 120G HD space; processor typically Celeron-2.4

    >So monitor your usage, if you rarely if ever come close to 256MB in usage,
    >more memory buys you nothing. If you do (and it's highly likely you will),
    >more memory is one of the best investments you can make.

    Only one caveat; don't add old RAM to an old PC you plan to abandon
    soon, as you can't use that RAM in your new replacement.


    >-------------------- ----- ---- --- -- - - - -
    Running Windows-based av to kill active malware is like striking
    a match to see if what you are standing in is water or petrol.
    >-------------------- ----- ---- --- -- - - - -
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