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NIC Card?

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Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
April 5, 2004 11:11:22 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

Hello all:

I have a Asus P4C800 -E Deluxe mobo and it has an onboard Intel R Pro
1000 NIC card (I think).

Problem is I could never get it to work with my cable modem. I
installed my old 3 comm 10/100 and I have internet access, I try to
use the Intel R Pro 1000 and although I enable it (and disable the 3
comm) and try to go through the new connection wizard it will not
connect with the internet.

Is this not a NIC card such as the 3 comm?

Thanks in advance!

Terry

More about : nic card

Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
April 5, 2004 1:11:51 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

MAy need its own driver what does device manager say about it? If the cable
modem doesn't talk gigabit enet then the best you'll get is whatever it
maxes out at probabley 100megs.
what are your cables are they cat5 or better? I think gigabit needs all 8
wires connected and distance is important.


"Terry M." <k8tjm1@nospam.adelphia.net> wrote in message
news:6df270hsbropv217ss3oo3438besbp2rnn@4ax.com...
> Hello all:
>
> I have a Asus P4C800 -E Deluxe mobo and it has an onboard Intel R Pro
> 1000 NIC card (I think).
>
> Problem is I could never get it to work with my cable modem. I
> installed my old 3 comm 10/100 and I have internet access, I try to
> use the Intel R Pro 1000 and although I enable it (and disable the 3
> comm) and try to go through the new connection wizard it will not
> connect with the internet.
>
> Is this not a NIC card such as the 3 comm?
>
> Thanks in advance!
>
> Terry
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
April 5, 2004 1:11:52 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

Gigabit does need all 8 wires, if that's the issue be sure you don't
have a cheap CAT5 cable with only pins 1,2,3,6 populated...

On Mon, 5 Apr 2004 09:11:51 -0400, "notritenoteri"
<coldasfire@hades.com> wrote:

>MAy need its own driver what does device manager say about it? If the cable
>modem doesn't talk gigabit enet then the best you'll get is whatever it
>maxes out at probabley 100megs.
>what are your cables are they cat5 or better? I think gigabit needs all 8
>wires connected and distance is important.
>
>
>"Terry M." <k8tjm1@nospam.adelphia.net> wrote in message
>news:6df270hsbropv217ss3oo3438besbp2rnn@4ax.com...
>> Hello all:
>>
>> I have a Asus P4C800 -E Deluxe mobo and it has an onboard Intel R Pro
>> 1000 NIC card (I think).
>>
>> Problem is I could never get it to work with my cable modem. I
>> installed my old 3 comm 10/100 and I have internet access, I try to
>> use the Intel R Pro 1000 and although I enable it (and disable the 3
>> comm) and try to go through the new connection wizard it will not
>> connect with the internet.
>>
>> Is this not a NIC card such as the 3 comm?
>>
>> Thanks in advance!
>>
>> Terry
>
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Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
April 6, 2004 5:41:19 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

It only needs all 8 wires for 1000 megabit (1 Gbit) operation. It
doesn't need all 8 for 100 mbps.

Cable and DSL modems often use only a 10mbps signaling rate. Is there a
chance that the Intel gigabit NIC is only 1000/100 mbps and is not
backwards compatible all the way to 10 mbps?

One other thought: You should not be connecting a cable modem directly
to the NIC card anyway. You should have a router, even if you are not
sharing the connection with any other computers. You really want your
computer hidden behind a router for security reasons.


Rivergoat wrote:

> Gigabit does need all 8 wires, if that's the issue be sure you don't
> have a cheap CAT5 cable with only pins 1,2,3,6 populated...
>
> On Mon, 5 Apr 2004 09:11:51 -0400, "notritenoteri"
> <coldasfire@hades.com> wrote:
>
>
>>MAy need its own driver what does device manager say about it? If the cable
>>modem doesn't talk gigabit enet then the best you'll get is whatever it
>>maxes out at probabley 100megs.
>>what are your cables are they cat5 or better? I think gigabit needs all 8
>>wires connected and distance is important.
>>
>>
>>"Terry M." <k8tjm1@nospam.adelphia.net> wrote in message
>>news:6df270hsbropv217ss3oo3438besbp2rnn@4ax.com...
>>
>>>Hello all:
>>>
>>>I have a Asus P4C800 -E Deluxe mobo and it has an onboard Intel R Pro
>>>1000 NIC card (I think).
>>>
>>>Problem is I could never get it to work with my cable modem. I
>>>installed my old 3 comm 10/100 and I have internet access, I try to
>>>use the Intel R Pro 1000 and although I enable it (and disable the 3
>>>comm) and try to go through the new connection wizard it will not
>>>connect with the internet.
>>>
>>>Is this not a NIC card such as the 3 comm?
>>>
>>>Thanks in advance!
>>>
>>>Terry
>>
>
April 6, 2004 10:58:40 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

Bah -- I have a two computer home network -- both connected to a switch (no
router), as I have two IP addresses from my ISP (the switch does no NAT or
any protection whatsoever). I run no firewall.

I have never gotten a worm/virus/trojan. Here's why.

I don't bind tcp/ip to microsoft file sharing/printing (I use netbeui for
communicating between the two computers -- even with XP), and I close all
unnecessary ports by shutting down dcom, etc. And I don't open any unknown
email attachments.

If you know what you are doing, you don't "need" a router or firewall. Both
my puters can be seen directly on the internet. Never had a problem.




"Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote in message
news:40720CAB.9030803@neo.rr.com...
>
> One other thought: You should not be connecting a cable modem directly
> to the NIC card anyway. You should have a router, even if you are not
> sharing the connection with any other computers. You really want your
> computer hidden behind a router for security reasons.
>
>
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
April 6, 2004 10:31:51 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

Well, what you are doing will certainly work, but it's not a good way to
operate in the current threat environment.

The issue isn't just virus'. Your system may well be "visible" to other
people on the same local subnet. Although you have taken some of the
recommended steps to prevent unauthorized access, those steps are not
taken by default, most other users don't know either what they are or
how to take them, and in fact they are not absolutely, 100% foolproof
even when taken.

I still recommend that anyone with a broadband connection use a router
even if there is no sharing of the connection.


Eric wrote:

> Bah -- I have a two computer home network -- both connected to a switch (no
> router), as I have two IP addresses from my ISP (the switch does no NAT or
> any protection whatsoever). I run no firewall.
>
> I have never gotten a worm/virus/trojan. Here's why.
>
> I don't bind tcp/ip to microsoft file sharing/printing (I use netbeui for
> communicating between the two computers -- even with XP), and I close all
> unnecessary ports by shutting down dcom, etc. And I don't open any unknown
> email attachments.
>
> If you know what you are doing, you don't "need" a router or firewall. Both
> my puters can be seen directly on the internet. Never had a problem.
>
>
>
>
> "Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote in message
> news:40720CAB.9030803@neo.rr.com...
>
>>One other thought: You should not be connecting a cable modem directly
>>to the NIC card anyway. You should have a router, even if you are not
>>sharing the connection with any other computers. You really want your
>>computer hidden behind a router for security reasons.
>>
>>
>
>
>
April 6, 2004 10:31:52 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

Sure -- that is wise advice for most computer users who, unlike me, don't
want to be bothered with the ins and outs of their operating system and
networking.

But I think it is interesting to read security forums and see how advanced
computer are so nervous, they think that running without a firewall will
instantly cause viruses/worms to infect their computers. Haven't had a
problem for years (except when installing a new computer OS and got blaster
before able to complete microsoft critical updates). Now I make sure to
download critical updates and service packs to other computer before
installing new computer OS.

"Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote in message
news:4072F985.1090109@neo.rr.com...
> Well, what you are doing will certainly work, but it's not a good way to
> operate in the current threat environment.
>
> The issue isn't just virus'. Your system may well be "visible" to other
> people on the same local subnet. Although you have taken some of the
> recommended steps to prevent unauthorized access, those steps are not
> taken by default, most other users don't know either what they are or
> how to take them, and in fact they are not absolutely, 100% foolproof
> even when taken.
>
> I still recommend that anyone with a broadband connection use a router
> even if there is no sharing of the connection.
>
>
> Eric wrote:
>
> > Bah -- I have a two computer home network -- both connected to a switch
(no
> > router), as I have two IP addresses from my ISP (the switch does no NAT
or
> > any protection whatsoever). I run no firewall.
> >
> > I have never gotten a worm/virus/trojan. Here's why.
> >
> > I don't bind tcp/ip to microsoft file sharing/printing (I use netbeui
for
> > communicating between the two computers -- even with XP), and I close
all
> > unnecessary ports by shutting down dcom, etc. And I don't open any
unknown
> > email attachments.
> >
> > If you know what you are doing, you don't "need" a router or firewall.
Both
> > my puters can be seen directly on the internet. Never had a problem.
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > "Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote in message
> > news:40720CAB.9030803@neo.rr.com...
> >
> >>One other thought: You should not be connecting a cable modem directly
> >>to the NIC card anyway. You should have a router, even if you are not
> >>sharing the connection with any other computers. You really want your
> >>computer hidden behind a router for security reasons.
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
> >
>
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
April 8, 2004 6:49:58 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

Since it works on your old NIC you might want to first use the modem
connected to the old 3com NIC and do an IPconfig release then turn off the
cable modem. Once that's done take out the old 3com NIC turn on your cable
modem then connect to the inbuilt NIC on the mother board, then perform an
IPconfig renew.

This should solve your problem...

Had the same thing when swapping brothers PC for a new one.

"Terry M." <k8tjm1@nospam.adelphia.net> wrote in message
news:6df270hsbropv217ss3oo3438besbp2rnn@4ax.com...
> Hello all:
>
> I have a Asus P4C800 -E Deluxe mobo and it has an onboard Intel R Pro
> 1000 NIC card (I think).
>
> Problem is I could never get it to work with my cable modem. I
> installed my old 3 comm 10/100 and I have internet access, I try to
> use the Intel R Pro 1000 and although I enable it (and disable the 3
> comm) and try to go through the new connection wizard it will not
> connect with the internet.
>
> Is this not a NIC card such as the 3 comm?
>
> Thanks in advance!
>
> Terry
!