Can a digital camera be considered computer equipment?

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Hello

Sorry if this off-topic

Can a digital camera be considered computer equipment?

Having accidentally and a irreparably damaged my digital camera, a
Epsom PhotoPC 850Z (bought Sept 2001 second hand for £300 via ebay),
I contacted my insurers, SAGA home insurance.

Their booklet/guide to claims, on page 14, says:

"We cover the following: TV, video, audio and computer equipment.
Accidental damage to television, radio, audio, video, satellite and
personal computer equipment in your home."

They do not accept my assertion that my former digital camera is/was
'computer equipment' :-(

I pointed out to them that in order to see any of the pictures I have
taken with the camera I have to download the pictures directly from
the digital camera via a USB cable and into computer memory.

If a digital camera is not seen as computer equipment then I foresee
similar problems with other hardware, eg if I should make a claim for
my scanner, or my printer, or other accessories such as the new USB
flash drives. I have been unable to find a definition for digital
camera.

Can anyone throw any light on this? Or perhaps signpost someone who
can.

It's worth noting that the SAGA manager I spoke with did not have a
digital camera :-(

Many thanks for your help
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5 answers Last reply
More about digital camera considered computer equipment
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    You can hire a lawyer to sue. Since the insurance company
    has to right to define the terms of their policy and you
    agreed to those terms when you read and purchased the
    policy, your chance of winning in court are very slight. If
    you had a good case, you could hire a lawyer on a
    contingency fee. But you need $10,000 or so for your law
    suit.

    Your problem is that the computer industry defined cameras
    as nice to have and they certainly increase the utility of
    the camera to own a computer, but the camera works just fine
    without a computer and your computer works just fine without
    a camera.

    The closest you come is that a scanner is just a very
    limited form of a camera, but you say they included scanners
    but not cameras. A scanner needs a computer (or an
    all-in-one setup).

    You should have bought a rider to your policy that covers
    such small items.

    No legal advice is given, just a layman's opinion.


    --
    The people think the Constitution protects their rights;
    But government sees it as an obstacle to be overcome.


    "PFC" <PFC@Home.gioserve.com> wrote in message
    news:g4mk90lek6l4blcid3runrque64jmh9h14@4ax.com...
    | Hello
    |
    | Sorry if this off-topic
    |
    | Can a digital camera be considered computer equipment?
    |
    | Having accidentally and a irreparably damaged my digital
    camera, a
    | Epsom PhotoPC 850Z (bought Sept 2001 second hand for £300
    via ebay),
    | I contacted my insurers, SAGA home insurance.
    |
    | Their booklet/guide to claims, on page 14, says:
    |
    | "We cover the following: TV, video, audio and computer
    equipment.
    | Accidental damage to television, radio, audio, video,
    satellite and
    | personal computer equipment in your home."
    |
    | They do not accept my assertion that my former digital
    camera is/was
    | 'computer equipment' :-(
    |
    | I pointed out to them that in order to see any of the
    pictures I have
    | taken with the camera I have to download the pictures
    directly from
    | the digital camera via a USB cable and into computer
    memory.
    |
    | If a digital camera is not seen as computer equipment then
    I foresee
    | similar problems with other hardware, eg if I should make
    a claim for
    | my scanner, or my printer, or other accessories such as
    the new USB
    | flash drives. I have been unable to find a definition for
    digital
    | camera.
    |
    | Can anyone throw any light on this? Or perhaps signpost
    someone who
    | can.
    |
    | It's worth noting that the SAGA manager I spoke with did
    not have a
    | digital camera :-(
    |
    | Many thanks for your help
    | =====================================
    | This email has been checked by
    | NORTON Anti Virus BEFORE sent to you.
    | =====================================
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    "PFC" <PFC@Home.gioserve.com> wrote in message
    news:g4mk90lek6l4blcid3runrque64jmh9h14@4ax.com...
    > Hello
    >
    > Sorry if this off-topic
    >
    > Can a digital camera be considered computer equipment?
    >
    > Having accidentally and a irreparably damaged my digital camera, a
    > Epsom PhotoPC 850Z (bought Sept 2001 second hand for £300 via ebay),
    > I contacted my insurers, SAGA home insurance.
    >
    > Their booklet/guide to claims, on page 14, says:
    >
    > "We cover the following: TV, video, audio and computer equipment.
    > Accidental damage to television, radio, audio, video, satellite and
    > personal computer equipment in your home."
    >
    > They do not accept my assertion that my former digital camera is/was
    > 'computer equipment' :-(
    >
    > I pointed out to them that in order to see any of the pictures I have
    > taken with the camera I have to download the pictures directly from
    > the digital camera via a USB cable and into computer memory.
    >
    > If a digital camera is not seen as computer equipment then I foresee
    > similar problems with other hardware, eg if I should make a claim for
    > my scanner, or my printer, or other accessories such as the new USB
    > flash drives. I have been unable to find a definition for digital
    > camera.
    >
    > Can anyone throw any light on this? Or perhaps signpost someone who
    > can.
    >
    > It's worth noting that the SAGA manager I spoke with did not have a
    > digital camera :-(
    >
    > Many thanks for your help
    > =====================================
    > This email has been checked by
    > NORTON Anti Virus BEFORE sent to you.
    > =====================================

    I am not a lawyer. (I don't even play one on T.V.)

    I do have a digital camera.

    My take would be no.

    A digital camera can perform it's intended function independently. The other
    items you mentioned (printer, scanner, flash drive) generally speaking
    cannot.

    Standalone "hook-it-up to a t.v." viewers are available to view the images
    on a memory card. Standalone photo printers that do not require a computer
    are as well. You can take a memory card with digital images on it to most
    photo processing facilities and get prints of your images. A computer is not
    a "required" part of the equation.

    Not the answer you were looking for I'm sure. :-(

    --
    D

    I'm not an MVP a VIP nor do I have ESP.
    I was just trying to help.
    Please use your own best judgment before implementing any suggestions or
    advice herein.
    No warranty is expressed or implied.
    Your mileage may vary.
    See store for details. :)

    Remove shoes to E-mail.
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    On Thu, 06 May 2004 16:30:08 +0100, PFC <PFC@Home.gioserve.com> wrote:

    >Hello
    >
    >Sorry if this off-topic
    >
    >Can a digital camera be considered computer equipment?
    >
    >Having accidentally and a irreparably damaged my digital camera, a
    >Epsom PhotoPC 850Z (bought Sept 2001 second hand for £300 via ebay),
    >I contacted my insurers, SAGA home insurance.
    >
    A digital camera does NOT require a computer to operate. Unlike a
    printer or scanner, they require a computer to be able to operate it.
    A camera is designed to be used -away- from a computer, and only
    connected to one to download pictures. So your insurer is correct, I'm
    afraid.

    Peter Hutchison
    Windows FAQ
    http://www.pcguru.plus.com/
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    I'd bet that this can be argued either way, since a computer is required (at
    least with some digital cameras) to complete the function of the camera,
    Namely retriving the pictures and processing them, and finally printing
    them.
    "Peter Hutchison" <pjhutch@NOSPAM.plus.com> wrote in message
    news:52aca0deej1i627sicb0vokgffhrctaqag@4ax.com...
    > On Thu, 06 May 2004 16:30:08 +0100, PFC <PFC@Home.gioserve.com> wrote:
    >
    > >Hello
    > >
    > >Sorry if this off-topic
    > >
    > >Can a digital camera be considered computer equipment?
    > >
    > >Having accidentally and a irreparably damaged my digital camera, a
    > >Epsom PhotoPC 850Z (bought Sept 2001 second hand for £300 via ebay),
    > >I contacted my insurers, SAGA home insurance.
    > >
    > A digital camera does NOT require a computer to operate. Unlike a
    > printer or scanner, they require a computer to be able to operate it.
    > A camera is designed to be used -away- from a computer, and only
    > connected to one to download pictures. So your insurer is correct, I'm
    > afraid.
    >
    > Peter Hutchison
    > Windows FAQ
    > http://www.pcguru.plus.com/
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    To the OP: It is an argument that will always be won by the
    insurance company, They wrote the policy, set the terms and
    sold it. You read the policy, asked questions or had the
    opportunity to do so, and you agreed to the terms and
    continue to pay the premiums.

    It will certainly cost you more than the cost of a camera to
    hire a lawyer to argue the case in a court. I doubt if any
    lawyer will take the case on a pro bono or even contingency
    basis because you have no case.

    You could file the case in a small claims court in the USA,
    don't know if such exist in the UK. Perhaps there is a
    legal aid group that can advise.


    --
    The people think the Constitution protects their rights;
    But government sees it as an obstacle to be overcome.


    "Chuck" <cdkuder@msn.com> wrote in message
    news:uloXtgvOEHA.1160@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    | I'd bet that this can be argued either way, since a
    computer is required (at
    | least with some digital cameras) to complete the function
    of the camera,
    | Namely retriving the pictures and processing them, and
    finally printing
    | them.
    | "Peter Hutchison" <pjhutch@NOSPAM.plus.com> wrote in
    message
    | news:52aca0deej1i627sicb0vokgffhrctaqag@4ax.com...
    | > On Thu, 06 May 2004 16:30:08 +0100, PFC
    <PFC@Home.gioserve.com> wrote:
    | >
    | > >Hello
    | > >
    | > >Sorry if this off-topic
    | > >
    | > >Can a digital camera be considered computer equipment?
    | > >
    | > >Having accidentally and a irreparably damaged my
    digital camera, a
    | > >Epsom PhotoPC 850Z (bought Sept 2001 second hand for
    £300 via ebay),
    | > >I contacted my insurers, SAGA home insurance.
    | > >
    | > A digital camera does NOT require a computer to operate.
    Unlike a
    | > printer or scanner, they require a computer to be able
    to operate it.
    | > A camera is designed to be used -away- from a computer,
    and only
    | > connected to one to download pictures. So your insurer
    is correct, I'm
    | > afraid.
    | >
    | > Peter Hutchison
    | > Windows FAQ
    | > http://www.pcguru.plus.com/
    |
    |
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