P4C800 Deluxe, No Post

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

While messing with the bios, I entered some improper values. I set the FSB
to 400, instead of 200. Anyways, the easy fix is to clear the CMOS.
Unfortunately, I am having trouble booting, even after clearing the CMOS.
Nothing I do will work.

The system starts up normally, you can hear all the fans, HD, and the CD
roms kick in. But I get no signal on the monitor and the USB and PS/2
devices don't light up.

I don't want have to RMA the board for something simple, any ideas?
5 answers Last reply
More about p4c800 deluxe post
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <9gasc.11410$eH1.6062021@newssvr28.news.prodigy.com>,
    "Philburg2" <philburg2@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

    > While messing with the bios, I entered some improper values. I set the FSB
    > to 400, instead of 200. Anyways, the easy fix is to clear the CMOS.
    > Unfortunately, I am having trouble booting, even after clearing the CMOS.
    > Nothing I do will work.
    >
    > The system starts up normally, you can hear all the fans, HD, and the CD
    > roms kick in. But I get no signal on the monitor and the USB and PS/2
    > devices don't light up.
    >
    > I don't want have to RMA the board for something simple, any ideas?

    I hope when you cleared the CMOS, that the computer was switched off
    on the back. Or, for good measure, the cord was pulled from the
    wall. That is a good practice anyway, to make certain there is no
    power in the computer while you are working on it, removing cards or
    DIMMs etc. You don't want the green LED on the motherboard to be glowing
    while clearing the CMOS, as a dual diode that powers the Southbridge
    CMOS ram can get damaged if +5VSB is still running, while you are
    clearing the CMOS. That is detailed in most Asus manuals.

    If USB and PS/2 devices aren't lighting, then your +5V is dead.
    (You know the +5VSB is working, because it is needed to start
    the PSU running.) There are polyfuses in the path to those
    devices, and those kinds of fuses automatically recover from
    an overload after they cool off. They are a conductive substance
    that open circuits at high temperature. So, that isn't the problem.
    It could be a PSU problem, but hard to believe that just that one
    supply output is dead or being shorted.

    Do the hard drive and CDROM flash their lights at power up ?
    They rely on +5V for that function.

    If the motherboard thinks the BIOS is corrupted (checksum
    failure), then inserting the CDROM that came with the motherboard,
    can give the BIOS boot block something to use to reflash the
    BIOS. Turn on the power, open the CDROM tray, and insert the
    Asus CDROM. Somewhere at the root level of the CDROM, should be
    a file like "P4C800.rom", and the motherboard can use that to
    reflash the BIOS. Let the system sit for a while, or until you
    hear a series of beeps, indicating flashing is complete. If
    the power fails or you mess around before flashing is complete,
    a complete failure of the BIOS to boot can be the result.

    If you remembered to archive the original BIOS file to a floppy,
    as recommended by the manual, you can use that floppy instead
    of the CDROM, to restore the BIOS that shipped with the board,
    rather than the older BIOS file stored as P4C800.rom on the
    motherboard CDROM.

    This is assuming, of course, that a BIOS corruption is the root
    of your problems. If the motherboard won't touch the floppy
    drive or the CDROM drive, then something else is wrong.
    Reassembling the system on a piece of cardboard, and removing
    unnecessary components, will allow you to add components one
    at a time, until the board stops functioning.

    HTH,
    Paul
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    clear cmos jumper.
    plug headphones into speaker jack
    listen to message.

    "Philburg2" <philburg2@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
    news:9gasc.11410$eH1.6062021@newssvr28.news.prodigy.com...
    > While messing with the bios, I entered some improper values. I set the
    FSB
    > to 400, instead of 200. Anyways, the easy fix is to clear the CMOS.
    > Unfortunately, I am having trouble booting, even after clearing the CMOS.
    > Nothing I do will work.
    >
    > The system starts up normally, you can hear all the fans, HD, and the CD
    > roms kick in. But I get no signal on the monitor and the USB and PS/2
    > devices don't light up.
    >
    > I don't want have to RMA the board for something simple, any ideas?
    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    As said, I've already cleared it. I get no beep code or voice message, but
    I'll try again.

    "RaiderNation" <raiderfan@blackhole.com> wrote in message
    news:bPasc.46769$Np3.1973805@ursa-nb00s0.nbnet.nb.ca...
    > clear cmos jumper.
    > plug headphones into speaker jack
    > listen to message.
    >
    > "Philburg2" <philburg2@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
    > news:9gasc.11410$eH1.6062021@newssvr28.news.prodigy.com...
    > > While messing with the bios, I entered some improper values. I set the
    > FSB
    > > to 400, instead of 200. Anyways, the easy fix is to clear the CMOS.
    > > Unfortunately, I am having trouble booting, even after clearing the
    CMOS.
    > > Nothing I do will work.
    > >
    > > The system starts up normally, you can hear all the fans, HD, and the CD
    > > roms kick in. But I get no signal on the monitor and the USB and PS/2
    > > devices don't light up.
    > >
    > > I don't want have to RMA the board for something simple, any ideas?
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Problem solved. This was the damnest thing and it didn't make a whole lot
    of sense. Anyways, I started swapping out parts like the VGA and the Ram.
    Well the video did nothing, but once I switched out the ram it worked and
    posted fine. So bad ram right? No, I take that ram and stick in another pc
    and that one boots fine too. So I'm sitting here going WTF. Turns out that
    by default the bios can't post off of my kingston PC3200. Does that make
    any sense to anyone? Once we reenter bios with the other ram, we can set it
    up and then plug in the kingston again. Then my friend messed with some
    settings and we had to do it again....

    Thanks for those who gave advice.
    "Paul" <nospam@needed.com> wrote in message
    news:nospam-2305042001300001@192.168.1.177...
    > In article <9gasc.11410$eH1.6062021@newssvr28.news.prodigy.com>,
    > "Philburg2" <philburg2@sbcglobal.net> wrote:
    >
    > > While messing with the bios, I entered some improper values. I set the
    FSB
    > > to 400, instead of 200. Anyways, the easy fix is to clear the CMOS.
    > > Unfortunately, I am having trouble booting, even after clearing the
    CMOS.
    > > Nothing I do will work.
    > >
    > > The system starts up normally, you can hear all the fans, HD, and the CD
    > > roms kick in. But I get no signal on the monitor and the USB and PS/2
    > > devices don't light up.
    > >
    > > I don't want have to RMA the board for something simple, any ideas?
    >
    > I hope when you cleared the CMOS, that the computer was switched off
    > on the back. Or, for good measure, the cord was pulled from the
    > wall. That is a good practice anyway, to make certain there is no
    > power in the computer while you are working on it, removing cards or
    > DIMMs etc. You don't want the green LED on the motherboard to be glowing
    > while clearing the CMOS, as a dual diode that powers the Southbridge
    > CMOS ram can get damaged if +5VSB is still running, while you are
    > clearing the CMOS. That is detailed in most Asus manuals.
    >
    > If USB and PS/2 devices aren't lighting, then your +5V is dead.
    > (You know the +5VSB is working, because it is needed to start
    > the PSU running.) There are polyfuses in the path to those
    > devices, and those kinds of fuses automatically recover from
    > an overload after they cool off. They are a conductive substance
    > that open circuits at high temperature. So, that isn't the problem.
    > It could be a PSU problem, but hard to believe that just that one
    > supply output is dead or being shorted.
    >
    > Do the hard drive and CDROM flash their lights at power up ?
    > They rely on +5V for that function.
    >
    > If the motherboard thinks the BIOS is corrupted (checksum
    > failure), then inserting the CDROM that came with the motherboard,
    > can give the BIOS boot block something to use to reflash the
    > BIOS. Turn on the power, open the CDROM tray, and insert the
    > Asus CDROM. Somewhere at the root level of the CDROM, should be
    > a file like "P4C800.rom", and the motherboard can use that to
    > reflash the BIOS. Let the system sit for a while, or until you
    > hear a series of beeps, indicating flashing is complete. If
    > the power fails or you mess around before flashing is complete,
    > a complete failure of the BIOS to boot can be the result.
    >
    > If you remembered to archive the original BIOS file to a floppy,
    > as recommended by the manual, you can use that floppy instead
    > of the CDROM, to restore the BIOS that shipped with the board,
    > rather than the older BIOS file stored as P4C800.rom on the
    > motherboard CDROM.
    >
    > This is assuming, of course, that a BIOS corruption is the root
    > of your problems. If the motherboard won't touch the floppy
    > drive or the CDROM drive, then something else is wrong.
    > Reassembling the system on a piece of cardboard, and removing
    > unnecessary components, will allow you to add components one
    > at a time, until the board stops functioning.
    >
    > HTH,
    > Paul
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <3upsc.3680$DX.810@newssvr16.news.prodigy.com>, "Philburg2"
    <philburg2@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

    > Problem solved. This was the damnest thing and it didn't make a whole lot
    > of sense. Anyways, I started swapping out parts like the VGA and the Ram.
    > Well the video did nothing, but once I switched out the ram it worked and
    > posted fine. So bad ram right? No, I take that ram and stick in another pc
    > and that one boots fine too. So I'm sitting here going WTF. Turns out that
    > by default the bios can't post off of my kingston PC3200. Does that make
    > any sense to anyone? Once we reenter bios with the other ram, we can set it
    > up and then plug in the kingston again. Then my friend messed with some
    > settings and we had to do it again....
    >
    > Thanks for those who gave advice.

    When a motherboard is set to get its RAM parameters "By SPD",
    it reads the required settings from the tiny eight pin SPD EEPROM
    on each DIMM. The motherboard trusts those settings, applies them,
    and if they don't work out, bad things could happen...

    If your motherboard has Voice POST, you should have heard some kind
    of error message.

    In some cases, Asus has actually added conditional code to the BIOS,
    to ignore the SPD for certain brands and model numbers of DIMM. I've
    seen this, by searching for DDR model numbers in the BIOS files
    with a hex editor.

    There have been some DIMMs, where the timing specs on the DIMMs
    changed after introduction. For example, some Hynix memories have
    a different CAS rating, depending on whether they are used on an
    AMD versus a Pentium motherboard.

    Makes me wonder though, how you got the motherboard to go in
    the first place ? Something must have set up the timing to
    non-default values, before that Kingston got put in there.

    HTH,
    Paul

    > "Paul" <nospam@needed.com> wrote in message
    > news:nospam-2305042001300001@192.168.1.177...
    > > In article <9gasc.11410$eH1.6062021@newssvr28.news.prodigy.com>,
    > > "Philburg2" <philburg2@sbcglobal.net> wrote:
    > >
    > > > While messing with the bios, I entered some improper values. I set the
    > FSB
    > > > to 400, instead of 200. Anyways, the easy fix is to clear the CMOS.
    > > > Unfortunately, I am having trouble booting, even after clearing the
    > CMOS.
    > > > Nothing I do will work.
    > > >
    > > > The system starts up normally, you can hear all the fans, HD, and the CD
    > > > roms kick in. But I get no signal on the monitor and the USB and PS/2
    > > > devices don't light up.
    > > >
    > > > I don't want have to RMA the board for something simple, any ideas?
    > >
    > > I hope when you cleared the CMOS, that the computer was switched off
    > > on the back. Or, for good measure, the cord was pulled from the
    > > wall. That is a good practice anyway, to make certain there is no
    > > power in the computer while you are working on it, removing cards or
    > > DIMMs etc. You don't want the green LED on the motherboard to be glowing
    > > while clearing the CMOS, as a dual diode that powers the Southbridge
    > > CMOS ram can get damaged if +5VSB is still running, while you are
    > > clearing the CMOS. That is detailed in most Asus manuals.
    > >
    > > If USB and PS/2 devices aren't lighting, then your +5V is dead.
    > > (You know the +5VSB is working, because it is needed to start
    > > the PSU running.) There are polyfuses in the path to those
    > > devices, and those kinds of fuses automatically recover from
    > > an overload after they cool off. They are a conductive substance
    > > that open circuits at high temperature. So, that isn't the problem.
    > > It could be a PSU problem, but hard to believe that just that one
    > > supply output is dead or being shorted.
    > >
    > > Do the hard drive and CDROM flash their lights at power up ?
    > > They rely on +5V for that function.
    > >
    > > If the motherboard thinks the BIOS is corrupted (checksum
    > > failure), then inserting the CDROM that came with the motherboard,
    > > can give the BIOS boot block something to use to reflash the
    > > BIOS. Turn on the power, open the CDROM tray, and insert the
    > > Asus CDROM. Somewhere at the root level of the CDROM, should be
    > > a file like "P4C800.rom", and the motherboard can use that to
    > > reflash the BIOS. Let the system sit for a while, or until you
    > > hear a series of beeps, indicating flashing is complete. If
    > > the power fails or you mess around before flashing is complete,
    > > a complete failure of the BIOS to boot can be the result.
    > >
    > > If you remembered to archive the original BIOS file to a floppy,
    > > as recommended by the manual, you can use that floppy instead
    > > of the CDROM, to restore the BIOS that shipped with the board,
    > > rather than the older BIOS file stored as P4C800.rom on the
    > > motherboard CDROM.
    > >
    > > This is assuming, of course, that a BIOS corruption is the root
    > > of your problems. If the motherboard won't touch the floppy
    > > drive or the CDROM drive, then something else is wrong.
    > > Reassembling the system on a piece of cardboard, and removing
    > > unnecessary components, will allow you to add components one
    > > at a time, until the board stops functioning.
    > >
    > > HTH,
    > > Paul
Ask a new question

Read More

Asus Motherboards