AMD Cool "n" Quiet - Good or Bad

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

I would like to know if the Cool "n" Quite feature offered by the Athlon64
and the used with the K8VSE Deluxe motherbard is any good. Will I take a
performance hit using it? I am using a Althon64 3200 with 1G mem and Win XP
Pro.

TIA
10 answers Last reply
More about cool quiet good
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    "Johnny B." <striderlirr@hotmail.com> writes:
    > I would like to know if the Cool "n" Quite feature offered by the Athlon64
    > and the used with the K8VSE Deluxe motherbard is any good. Will I take a
    > performance hit using it? I am using a Althon64 3200 with 1G mem and Win XP
    > Pro.

    I turned on the cool-n-quiet on my k8v-se-d just for grins. After
    saving the settings for cool-n-quiet, I returned to the bios setup and
    watched the temperatures and fan RPM via the hardware monitor page.
    Over the course of a minute of two the bios slowly turned the CPU
    fan's RPM down lower and lower till the fan finally stopped. The CPU
    temperature naturally sky-rocketed well past 50 degrees C. I quickly
    turned the cool-n-quiet off, saved the settings and then entered the
    bios again to watch the temperature drop to normal levels. Something
    is clearly wrong with their BIOS software. If you turn it on I'd be
    very careful and watch that it doesn't misbehave. You don't want to
    fry an expensive CPU.

    -wolfgang
    --
    Wolfgang S. Rupprecht http://www.wsrcc.com/wolfgang/
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    > > I would like to know if the Cool "n" Quite feature offered by the
    Athlon64
    > > and the used with the K8VSE Deluxe motherbard is any good. Will I take a
    > > performance hit using it? I am using a Althon64 3200 with 1G mem and Win
    XP
    > > Pro.
    >
    > I turned on the cool-n-quiet on my k8v-se-d just for grins. After
    > saving the settings for cool-n-quiet, I returned to the bios setup and
    > watched the temperatures and fan RPM via the hardware monitor page.
    > Over the course of a minute of two the bios slowly turned the CPU
    > fan's RPM down lower and lower till the fan finally stopped. The CPU
    > temperature naturally sky-rocketed well past 50 degrees C. I quickly
    > turned the cool-n-quiet off, saved the settings and then entered the
    > bios again to watch the temperature drop to normal levels. Something
    > is clearly wrong with their BIOS software. If you turn it on I'd be
    > very careful and watch that it doesn't misbehave. You don't want to
    > fry an expensive CPU.

    I don't know the K8VSE Deluxe. I am using a K8V Deluxe and an Athlon 64
    3000+. Cool 'n Quiet is running without any problems. The CPU fan only runs
    when needed. When CPU temperature rises to about 52 degrees Celsius, CPU fan
    starts running and stops, when CPU temperature goes down to about 46 degrees
    (shown by Asus Probe).

    Siegfried
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Hi Johnny,
    C"n"Q works perfectly for me. I have exactly the same MB/cpu/memory as
    yourself. When not gaming (UT2004) it kicks in unoticeably. At the moment
    it's running at 1000mhz, voltage 1.074. ASUS probe gives me a cpu of
    27degrees, mb 24degrees, this with an ambient temperature of 21degrees.
    When online gaming C"n"Q quits giving exellent performance. UT2004 gives me
    100+fps with all settings maxed out. CPU temps rise to 40-43 degrees, mb
    possibly 30degrees. When C"n"Q does kick in there is no noticeable drop in
    performance. All day to day operations still appear to be instantaneous and
    I have to click the icon to see it is in fact in operation.
    Since building I have flashed the bios to 1002.006 dated 4/14/2004.
    Cool "n" Quiet is, for me, the best thing since CSI (get'em Grissom).
    HTH
    Dave

    "Johnny B." <striderlirr@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:5lvtc.60336$cz5.25396404@news4.srv.hcvlny.cv.net...
    > I would like to know if the Cool "n" Quite feature offered by the Athlon64
    > and the used with the K8VSE Deluxe motherbard is any good. Will I take a
    > performance hit using it? I am using a Althon64 3200 with 1G mem and Win
    XP
    > Pro.
    >
    > TIA
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Thanks to everyone for there input.

    J
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Yes, the temperature does rise up to about 52C before the fans cut in - It
    scared me a bit when I first tried it.
    But providing it does not go higher - i.e. C&Q is working, then everything
    should be reliable.
    If you don't like the idea of the fans not cutting in until 52C or so, then
    simply disable the Q-Fan thingy and let the fan run continuously. This
    should make the CPU temperature plummet downwards during idle.
    I have not noticed any performance degradation with C&Q, although I suspect
    that there probably is a tiny bit when you first start a demanding program
    and ithe ciruits have to "ramp up" to full voltage and speed.
    I particularly like the fact that the power is reduced so much during C&Q
    operation - This should improve the reliability of the power supply circuits
    on the motherboard as well as the ATX Power Supply.
    - Steve

    "Johnny B." <striderlirr@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:5lvtc.60336$cz5.25396404@news4.srv.hcvlny.cv.net...
    > I would like to know if the Cool "n" Quite feature offered by the Athlon64
    > and the used with the K8VSE Deluxe motherbard is any good. Will I take a
    > performance hit using it? I am using a Althon64 3200 with 1G mem and Win
    XP
    > Pro.
    >
    > TIA
    >
    >
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Steve Birch wrote:
    > I particularly like the fact that the power is reduced so much during C&Q
    > operation - This should improve the reliability of the power supply
    > circuits on the motherboard as well as the ATX Power Supply.

    Conversely, the heat cycling of the components could make them less
    reliable. Anecdotal evidence, as well as various studies, have shown that
    it is lots of changes in temperature that causes many problems, rather than
    constant "high" temperature. The thermal cycling causes the components to
    expand and contract, which, over time, damages them. Also, connectors can
    creep when exposed to thermal cycling.

    Ben
    --
    A7N8X FAQ: www.ben.pope.name/a7n8x_faq.html
    Questions by email will likely be ignored, please use the newsgroups.
    I'm not just a number. To many, I'm known as a String...
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Ben Pope wrote:

    > Conversely, the heat cycling of the components could make them less
    > reliable. Anecdotal evidence, as well as various studies, have shown that
    > it is lots of changes in temperature that causes many problems, rather than
    > constant "high" temperature. The thermal cycling causes the components to
    > expand and contract, which, over time, damages them. Also, connectors can
    > creep when exposed to thermal cycling.
    >
    > Ben

    wise words oh holy one...
    Just how long have Ben POPE for?
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Yes - that's certainly a valid way of looking at it, Ben!
    But bearing in mind that semiconductor reliability decreases exponentially
    with temperature - and also the fact that my own system stabilises nicely in
    the "cool" mode most of the time the way I use it - I think that I prefer to
    use the C&Q rather than not.
    The variation in temperature of the power supply components is reduced if it
    incorporates a temperature controlled fan.
    Another point is that most of the failures I have experienced with PCs are
    related to fan failure, particularly smaller ones like chipset or CPU fans.
    They go noisy then seize up. I therefore like the idea of running the CPU
    fan only occasionally, which is what happens in my own system.
    On the other hand, I used to set my system to spin down it's hard drives
    whenever they had not been used for a while. I have stopped doing this, as I
    get the feeling that regular contact start/stop cycles are probably more
    detrimental than leaving the fluid bearings spinning...

    - Steve

    "Ben Pope" <spam@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:2hpnlqFfbkvoU1@uni-berlin.de...
    > Steve Birch wrote:
    > > I particularly like the fact that the power is reduced so much during
    C&Q
    > > operation - This should improve the reliability of the power supply
    > > circuits on the motherboard as well as the ATX Power Supply.
    >
    > Conversely, the heat cycling of the components could make them less
    > reliable. Anecdotal evidence, as well as various studies, have shown that
    > it is lots of changes in temperature that causes many problems, rather
    than
    > constant "high" temperature. The thermal cycling causes the components to
    > expand and contract, which, over time, damages them. Also, connectors can
    > creep when exposed to thermal cycling.
    >
    > Ben
    > --
    > A7N8X FAQ: www.ben.pope.name/a7n8x_faq.html
    > Questions by email will likely be ignored, please use the newsgroups.
    > I'm not just a number. To many, I'm known as a String...
    >
    >
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    On Fri, 28 May 2004 22:02:40 GMT, Legend <ISO-teric@ISOLated.com>
    wrote:

    >Ben Pope wrote:
    >
    >> Conversely, the heat cycling of the components could make them less
    >> reliable. Anecdotal evidence, as well as various studies, have shown that
    >> it is lots of changes in temperature that causes many problems, rather than
    >> constant "high" temperature. The thermal cycling causes the components to
    >> expand and contract, which, over time, damages them. Also, connectors can
    >> creep when exposed to thermal cycling.
    >>
    >> Ben
    >
    >wise words oh holy one...
    >Just how long have Ben POPE for?

    I guess he can be Pope as long as he doesn't break any cardinal
    rules...

    Kevin Miller

    "Either way, it is bad for Zathras."
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Steve Birch wrote:
    > Yes - that's certainly a valid way of looking at it, Ben!
    > But bearing in mind that semiconductor reliability decreases exponentially
    > with temperature - and also the fact that my own system stabilises nicely
    > in the "cool" mode most of the time the way I use it - I think that I
    > prefer to use the C&Q rather than not.

    Indeed... I was thinking more along the lines of the discrete components
    like capacitors - especially on the CPU voltage regulation side of things.

    > The variation in temperature of the power supply components is reduced if
    > it incorporates a temperature controlled fan.
    > Another point is that most of the failures I have experienced with PCs are
    > related to fan failure, particularly smaller ones like chipset or CPU
    > fans. They go noisy then seize up. I therefore like the idea of running
    > the CPU fan only occasionally, which is what happens in my own system.

    Fair enough.

    > On the other hand, I used to set my system to spin down it's hard drives
    > whenever they had not been used for a while. I have stopped doing this,
    > as I get the feeling that regular contact start/stop cycles are probably
    > more detrimental than leaving the fluid bearings spinning...

    The specs usually say how many start/stop cycles the drive can handle... It
    is true that spinning hard drives up is one of the most strenuous activities
    the drive can do, leaving them running is not a bad idea.

    Ben
    --
    A7N8X FAQ: www.ben.pope.name/a7n8x_faq.html
    Questions by email will likely be ignored, please use the newsgroups.
    I'm not just a number. To many, I'm known as a String...
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