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CUV-4X problems with Network card and Audio using Windows ..

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Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
June 2, 2004 3:38:47 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

Hello,

I am upgrading my wife's old computer with some parts from my old computer
which I recently upgraded to a Pentium 4. The parts I installed into my
wife's computer is a Pentium 3-800 as she only uses it for a few games and
word processing. I also want her to surf the net through using the network
and my computer as the gateway..

The usual setup of creating the partitions of the hard drives and the
regular loading of Windows 98 SE. Everything seems to load in okay but I
noticed that The on-board sound card was not working although it appears
that the on-board sound volume control is shown in the task bar to the lower
right. That was corrected by the installation of the ASUS audio drivers.

A few days later I purchased a couple of network cards (the generic
Realtek's RTL8100C based on the 8039 series) and the problems were arising.

The first problem started instantly after the installation of the drivers
where the computer resetted itself (This was after loading from the drivers
disk and now using the Windows 98 setup CD for further stuff). When the
computer powered up and back into Windows, the network card had a "Code 11"
when I looked at its properties.

Thinking that the drivers were not correctly installed, I reinstalled them
and started the network card through the ASD and I had to reset the computer
which was fair enough. The problem still stood there when it tried to open
Windows 98 and it resetted once again with the network card with the code 11
error and throwing me into "safe mode".

Thinking that this might be a network card problem, I changed the cards to
my computer (which is connected to the cable modem) and it appears to be
working quite fine. I also placed back in an old 10Mb (Realtek's 8029AS
series) network card which worked well in her old computer but the problem
still exists. Well at least that the hardware is working.

After several failed attempts, I then reinstalled the Windows 98 and this
time included the network card. This time the network card worked well (but
I haven't as yet installed the Asus audio drivers). When installing the
driver for the audio, I found out that the problem had started once again
back into "safe mode". I then taken out the network card and the computer
seems to work well.

Now I know that the problem stems with the relationship between the network
card and the on-board sound card. Previously when I had the motherboard in
my computer, I never used the on-board sound card as that I used then the
SoundBlaster Live and they worked well with the old 8029 network card.

I under that this is about as long winded as Godzilla's farts but my
question to all is that is that has someone experience this problem and has
found a rectification (preferably as a last resort to purchase a separate
sound card) for this problem. I would be gratefully appreciated in someone
can reply to this.

Kindest regards
June 2, 2004 5:54:08 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

Try placing the NIC in a different slot. If it's sharing an IRQ with the
sound chip you may have the problems you describe.

R


"LDL" <enquiries@asio.gov.au> wrote in message
news:bs8vc.1126$rz4.268@news-server.bigpond.net.au...
> Hello,
>
> I am upgrading my wife's old computer with some parts from my old computer
> which I recently upgraded to a Pentium 4. The parts I installed into my
> wife's computer is a Pentium 3-800 as she only uses it for a few games and
> word processing. I also want her to surf the net through using the
network
> and my computer as the gateway..
>
> The usual setup of creating the partitions of the hard drives and the
> regular loading of Windows 98 SE. Everything seems to load in okay but I
> noticed that The on-board sound card was not working although it appears
> that the on-board sound volume control is shown in the task bar to the
lower
> right. That was corrected by the installation of the ASUS audio drivers.
>
> A few days later I purchased a couple of network cards (the generic
> Realtek's RTL8100C based on the 8039 series) and the problems were
arising.
>
> The first problem started instantly after the installation of the drivers
> where the computer resetted itself (This was after loading from the
drivers
> disk and now using the Windows 98 setup CD for further stuff). When the
> computer powered up and back into Windows, the network card had a "Code
11"
> when I looked at its properties.
>
> Thinking that the drivers were not correctly installed, I reinstalled them
> and started the network card through the ASD and I had to reset the
computer
> which was fair enough. The problem still stood there when it tried to
open
> Windows 98 and it resetted once again with the network card with the code
11
> error and throwing me into "safe mode".
>
> Thinking that this might be a network card problem, I changed the cards to
> my computer (which is connected to the cable modem) and it appears to be
> working quite fine. I also placed back in an old 10Mb (Realtek's 8029AS
> series) network card which worked well in her old computer but the problem
> still exists. Well at least that the hardware is working.
>
> After several failed attempts, I then reinstalled the Windows 98 and this
> time included the network card. This time the network card worked well
(but
> I haven't as yet installed the Asus audio drivers). When installing the
> driver for the audio, I found out that the problem had started once again
> back into "safe mode". I then taken out the network card and the computer
> seems to work well.
>
> Now I know that the problem stems with the relationship between the
network
> card and the on-board sound card. Previously when I had the motherboard
in
> my computer, I never used the on-board sound card as that I used then the
> SoundBlaster Live and they worked well with the old 8029 network card.
>
> I under that this is about as long winded as Godzilla's farts but my
> question to all is that is that has someone experience this problem and
has
> found a rectification (preferably as a last resort to purchase a separate
> sound card) for this problem. I would be gratefully appreciated in
someone
> can reply to this.
>
> Kindest regards
>
>
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
June 2, 2004 10:14:54 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

"Rich" <nbrk911@windy.comcast.net> wrote in message
news:4ravc.33119$eY2.30585@attbi_s02...
> Try placing the NIC in a different slot. If it's sharing an IRQ with the
> sound chip you may have the problems you describe.

Conflict with the IRQs would be the first place I would have looked. The
sound card I made sure that it has so that the IRD for the plug and pray for
the NIC would have chosen another.

As for the other slot, I will give it a try.

I will advised when it works.

Kindest regards
Related resources
June 2, 2004 10:14:55 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

In article <yfevc.1690$rz4.1624@news-server.bigpond.net.au>, "LDL"
<enquiries@asio.gov.au> wrote:

> "Rich" <nbrk911@windy.comcast.net> wrote in message
> news:4ravc.33119$eY2.30585@attbi_s02...
> > Try placing the NIC in a different slot. If it's sharing an IRQ with the
> > sound chip you may have the problems you describe.
>
> Conflict with the IRQs would be the first place I would have looked. The
> sound card I made sure that it has so that the IRD for the plug and pray for
> the NIC would have chosen another.
>
> As for the other slot, I will give it a try.
>
> I will advised when it works.
>
> Kindest regards

Try the sound card in PCI slot 3. Then, experiment with the NIC in
the remaining slots.

Paul
June 2, 2004 3:21:21 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

I read it to say that he was using the onboard sound. He will not be able
to move that to slot3.


"Paul" <nospam@needed.com> wrote in message
news:nospam-0206040339080001@192.168.1.177...
> In article <yfevc.1690$rz4.1624@news-server.bigpond.net.au>, "LDL"
> <enquiries@asio.gov.au> wrote:
>
> > "Rich" <nbrk911@windy.comcast.net> wrote in message
> > news:4ravc.33119$eY2.30585@attbi_s02...
> > > Try placing the NIC in a different slot. If it's sharing an IRQ with
the
> > > sound chip you may have the problems you describe.
> >
> > Conflict with the IRQs would be the first place I would have looked.
The
> > sound card I made sure that it has so that the IRD for the plug and pray
for
> > the NIC would have chosen another.
> >
> > As for the other slot, I will give it a try.
> >
> > I will advised when it works.
> >
> > Kindest regards
>
> Try the sound card in PCI slot 3. Then, experiment with the NIC in
> the remaining slots.
>
> Paul
June 2, 2004 3:21:22 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

In article <NKivc.30783$pt3.25265@attbi_s03>, "Rich"
<nbrk911@windy.comcast.net> wrote:

> I read it to say that he was using the onboard sound. He will not be able
> to move that to slot3.

Ouch, I missed that. With all the talk about "sound cards", I thought
it was a PCI.

The manual has the AC97 sharing with the AGP slot and PCI slot 2.
Just keep the NIC out of slot 2.

Google doesn't have too much info on this. Many people seem to
chicken out, and disable AC97 and use a separate PCI sound card.
It is hard to say whether anyone got it to work properly
or not. There are four jumpers to enable or disable the AC97
codec and a BIOS setting as well.

Paul

>
>
> "Paul" <nospam@needed.com> wrote in message
> news:nospam-0206040339080001@192.168.1.177...
> > In article <yfevc.1690$rz4.1624@news-server.bigpond.net.au>, "LDL"
> > <enquiries@asio.gov.au> wrote:
> >
> > > "Rich" <nbrk911@windy.comcast.net> wrote in message
> > > news:4ravc.33119$eY2.30585@attbi_s02...
> > > > Try placing the NIC in a different slot. If it's sharing an IRQ with
> the
> > > > sound chip you may have the problems you describe.
> > >
> > > Conflict with the IRQs would be the first place I would have looked.
> The
> > > sound card I made sure that it has so that the IRD for the plug and pray
> for
> > > the NIC would have chosen another.
> > >
> > > As for the other slot, I will give it a try.
> > >
> > > I will advised when it works.
> > >
> > > Kindest regards
> >
> > Try the sound card in PCI slot 3. Then, experiment with the NIC in
> > the remaining slots.
> >
> > Paul
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
June 3, 2004 6:41:43 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

It is a bit of a laugh in seeing that and currently the situation is the
following:

I placed the card to another PCI slot (Slot 4 giving space at slot 5 as a
little breather for the VGA card's air flow) and it seems to work.

Also I did disabled the legacy SoundBlaster IRQ-5 where both the "ON-BOARD"
sound card is working together with the NIC.

I am just having small network problems where the NIC is not talking on the
network. My own computer can see the computer but are not talking together.
Soon we will get them together.

Thanks anyway and Kindest regards

"Rich" <nbrk911@windy.comcast.net> wrote in message
news:NKivc.30783$pt3.25265@attbi_s03...
> I read it to say that he was using the onboard sound. He will not be able
> to move that to slot3.
>
>
> "Paul" <nospam@needed.com> wrote in message
> news:nospam-0206040339080001@192.168.1.177...
> > In article <yfevc.1690$rz4.1624@news-server.bigpond.net.au>, "LDL"
> > <enquiries@asio.gov.au> wrote:
> >
> > > "Rich" <nbrk911@windy.comcast.net> wrote in message
> > > news:4ravc.33119$eY2.30585@attbi_s02...
> > > > Try placing the NIC in a different slot. If it's sharing an IRQ
with
> the
> > > > sound chip you may have the problems you describe.
> > >
> > > Conflict with the IRQs would be the first place I would have looked.
> The
> > > sound card I made sure that it has so that the IRD for the plug and
pray
> for
> > > the NIC would have chosen another.
> > >
> > > As for the other slot, I will give it a try.
> > >
> > > I will advised when it works.
> > >
> > > Kindest regards
> >
> > Try the sound card in PCI slot 3. Then, experiment with the NIC in
> > the remaining slots.
> >
> > Paul
>
>
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
June 3, 2004 6:58:32 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

"Paul" <nospam@needed.com> wrote in message
news:nospam-0206040958110001@192.168.1.177...
> In article <NKivc.30783$pt3.25265@attbi_s03>, "Rich"
> <nbrk911@windy.comcast.net> wrote:
>
> > I read it to say that he was using the onboard sound. He will not be
able
> > to move that to slot3.
>
> Ouch, I missed that. With all the talk about "sound cards", I thought
> it was a PCI.
>
> The manual has the AC97 sharing with the AGP slot and PCI slot 2.
> Just keep the NIC out of slot 2.

Interesting that I was using Slot 2 but I couldn't seen anything that showed
the sharing of the AGP and Slot 2. The only thing I saw was the INT-B
sharing with Slot 2.on page 27 of the PDF manual.

Can you show me?

Kindest regards
June 3, 2004 1:52:11 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

In article <stwvc.3338$rz4.228@news-server.bigpond.net.au>, "LDL"
<enquiries@asio.gov.au> wrote:

> "Paul" <nospam@needed.com> wrote in message
> news:nospam-0206040958110001@192.168.1.177...
> > In article <NKivc.30783$pt3.25265@attbi_s03>, "Rich"
> > <nbrk911@windy.comcast.net> wrote:
> >
> > > I read it to say that he was using the onboard sound. He will not be
> able
> > > to move that to slot3.
> >
> > Ouch, I missed that. With all the talk about "sound cards", I thought
> > it was a PCI.
> >
> > The manual has the AC97 sharing with the AGP slot and PCI slot 2.
> > Just keep the NIC out of slot 2.
>
> Interesting that I was using Slot 2 but I couldn't seen anything that showed
> the sharing of the AGP and Slot 2. The only thing I saw was the INT-B
> sharing with Slot 2.on page 27 of the PDF manual.
>
> Can you show me?
>
> Kindest regards

In interrupt structures, there are many tables of number mapping
stuff from the physical level to the OS. At the bottom level are
the actual interrupt signals. On the PCI bus, these are called INTA,
INTB, INTC, and INTD. Depending on the fanout of the interrupt
controller on the motherboard, there can be other interrupt signals
as well, and these can be used for other motherboard resources.

At the next level, are IRQs. As far as I can tell, this is a
number that gets looked up, when a physical interrupt is asserted.
It is possible for two physical interrupt signals to terminate
in the same IRQ, but as far as I can figure, not possible for
one (shared, multiple master) interrupt signal to result in
two IRQs. That is why I'm saying that when devices share a
physical interrupt signal, they have the same IRQ number assigned
to them, and any interrupt handlers have to execute sequentially
until the interrupt signal is cleared, or all handlers have had
a shot at it.

The INTB signal is used by PCI Slot 2, the AGP slot, and the audio
chip on the motherboard (looking at page 27). As far as I know, a
system will assign the same IRQ to them, because they are the same
physical interrupt signal, and the system has no choice in the matter.
When the interrupt is asserted, the interrupt handlers for all three
devices may be invoked, in an attempt to figure out which hardware
is asserting the interrupt.

I've tried to research the dual cascaded 8259 interrupt controller
emulation used in the chipset, but I cannot find an original Intel
8259 datasheet in all its glory. The sad part is, I actually owned
the databook with that device in it, from around 1989, but threw it
out on the assumption I would never see another 82xxx device again.
I think all the two 8259s can do, is give a number between 0000
and 1111 binary, corresponding to which interrupt line is being
tugged (basically a priority encoder).

Starting on page 103 of the following chipset document, is some
details of how the IOAPIC sits in front of the cascaded 8259s, to
steer interrupts to the interrupt controller. In this document,
the four PCI interrupt signals are called PIRQ(A,B,C,D), but
they are one and the same as the INTA..D mentioned above.

http://www.intel.com/design/intarch/DATASHTS/29055002.p... (pg.103)

The following thread will give some background as well, and the thread
contains several posts from the person who actually wrote Microsoft's
IRQ handling code:

(Click the Complete Thread button)
http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&selm...

I check my IRQs by using the Sisoftware Sandra "Hardware IRQ" module,
but I think you can dig through the Device Manager interface and
get the IRQ assignments as well.

Depending on the hardware and software, you might see 16 or 24 IRQs
in play at any one time. I've seen numbers 16 through 24 used for
PCI cards, and of course, any motherboard devices that also happen
to share the same physical interrupt line.

My understanding of all this stuff is quite incomplete, because
every author I read on the subject, only addresses how things work
at their particular level, and there isn't a "primer" that walks
an interrupt event from the physical level, through the OS. Maybe it
exists somewhere, but I didn't find it just now.

Scroll down and note the sharing of IRQ11 in the picture on
this web page:

http://www.wown.info/j_helmig/intshare.htm

There is another example here. Too bad the author of this post
didn't note the slots he had the cards plugged into, because
it would have been educational.

http://abxzone.com/forums/showpost.php?p=254936&postcou...

HTH,
Paul
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
June 6, 2004 7:50:52 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

"LDL" <enquiries@asio.gov.au> wrote in message
news:Hdwvc.3331$rz4.2167@news-server.bigpond.net.au...
> It is a bit of a laugh in seeing that and currently the situation is the
> following:
>
> I placed the card to another PCI slot (Slot 4 giving space at slot 5 as a
> little breather for the VGA card's air flow) and it seems to work.
>
> Also I did disabled the legacy SoundBlaster IRQ-5 where both the
"ON-BOARD"
> sound card is working together with the NIC.
>
> I am just having small network problems where the NIC is not talking on
the
> network. My own computer can see the computer but are not talking
together.
> Soon we will get them together.
>
> Thanks anyway and Kindest regards

Is your new PIV computer running WinXP of other firewall software? If yes,
then the PIV will see the other computer, but will not let itself be seen by
the WIN98SE computer. (unless you change some settings)
!