Hard drive corrupt at every reboot

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

I have a workstation I built with Windows XP Pro running on it. Every time I
reboot, before rebooting everything is a-ok, but after rebooting it starts
up with the hard drive corrupted. I have to make sometimes as many as four
passes of bootup disk check (a reboot each time) before I can get it to boot
successfully without errors. Repeat at next manual reboot... !

What is the cause of this? I've checked the voltage going to the power
supply, it's 117 volts, which is fine. I have not yet checked the voltage
going into the hard drive from the power supply, but I don't know how to do
that.

Anything else I can do? I am stumped!

Jon
6 answers Last reply
More about hard drive corrupt reboot
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    The cause of disk failure is never clear. Your symptoms have been evident on several PCs I support after recent electrical storms. Thus one concludes that there was not sufficient power surge protection for the PCs.

    What is certain, sadly for you, is that your hard disk will not magically fix itself, nor will scan disk, check disk or any utility program from a 3rd party vendor.

    Take the time now, before its too late to go and buy a new hard drive. Make sure its compatible with your motherboard and have your current drive imaged to the new one. Some retail packaged drives have disk imaging software that is included. I have personally used the Maxtor product with great success. It has exellent instructions and a well written manual for the noovie user.

    Go for one that has a bootable CD / Floppy and will allow you to create a partition and format the drive, plus image your old drive. Do not try to do this in XP cfasue you may find errors with drive letter assignments.
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    "Jon Davis" <jon@REMOVE.ME.jondavis.net> wrote in message
    news:%23JmALEhOEHA.624@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
    >snip>

    What is the cause of this? I've checked the voltage going to the power
    > supply, it's 117 volts, which is fine. I have not yet checked the voltage
    > going into the hard drive from the power supply, but I don't know how to
    do
    > that.
    >
    > Anything else I can do? I am stumped!
    >
    > Jon
    >

    Maybe your hard drive is, in fact, going bad?


    --
    Regards:

    Richard Urban

    aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Why would it work fine during normal use, but then go bad @ reboot?

    Jon

    "Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)" <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote in
    message news:%23DxpaUhOEHA.2952@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    >
    >
    > "Jon Davis" <jon@REMOVE.ME.jondavis.net> wrote in message
    > news:%23JmALEhOEHA.624@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
    > >snip>
    >
    > What is the cause of this? I've checked the voltage going to the power
    > > supply, it's 117 volts, which is fine. I have not yet checked the
    voltage
    > > going into the hard drive from the power supply, but I don't know how to
    > do
    > > that.
    > >
    > > Anything else I can do? I am stumped!
    > >
    > > Jon
    > >
    >
    > Maybe your hard drive is, in fact, going bad?
    >
    >
    > --
    > Regards:
    >
    > Richard Urban
    >
    > aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    I not only have surge protection but in fact I have a UPS.

    If you think the hard drive has "gone out", why would it work fine during
    normal use for days, but then go bad at reboot?

    Jon


    "BAR" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:6E748073-BFDD-4D98-98E9-5F7D3D41BB88@microsoft.com...
    > The cause of disk failure is never clear. Your symptoms have been evident
    on several PCs I support after recent electrical storms. Thus one concludes
    that there was not sufficient power surge protection for the PCs.
    >
    > What is certain, sadly for you, is that your hard disk will not magically
    fix itself, nor will scan disk, check disk or any utility program from a 3rd
    party vendor.
    >
    > Take the time now, before its too late to go and buy a new hard drive.
    Make sure its compatible with your motherboard and have your current drive
    imaged to the new one. Some retail packaged drives have disk imaging
    software that is included. I have personally used the Maxtor product with
    great success. It has exellent instructions and a well written manual for
    the noovie user.
    >
    > Go for one that has a bootable CD / Floppy and will allow you to create a
    partition and format the drive, plus image your old drive. Do not try to do
    this in XP cfasue you may find errors with drive letter assignments.
    >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    I assume you are talking about a cold boot (power turned
    off, then on) verses a warm boot (OS reboots while computer
    remains powered). Upon power up, a disk drive's computer does
    an automatic reset. This in response to the 5 volts rising
    from 0 to 5. On warm reboot, the disk drive computer must be
    issued a command to reset itself. Note the different ways a
    disk drive might be initialized.

    Ok. Your drive will reset itself when 5 volts goes from 0
    to 5. But will not properly reset when issued software
    commands to reset. This is only a possibility and not the
    only reason for your symptoms.

    As for that UPS - it and those power strip surge protectors
    contain same surge protector circuits. Neither claims to
    protect from a destructive type of surge. They simply claim
    to be surge protectors and leave you to *assume* that is for
    all types of surges.

    Any protection effective at the computer must already be
    inside the computer. Internal protection that also assumes a
    destructive type of surge will be earthed before entering the
    building. Note the most critical component in any surge
    protection *system*. Earthing. Since neither that UPS nor
    power strip claims such protection, then they also avoid all
    discussion about earthing.

    Then there are those who recommend plug-in surge protectors
    only because of word association. Protector must be
    protection. Wrong. Shunt mode protector is a device that
    only distributes a surge to all other wires during that
    surge. Protection is single point earth ground. Effective
    protector must connect less than 10 feet to protection. Just
    another fact those manufacturers forget to mention. No earth
    ground means no effective protection from destructive type of
    surges. Furthermore effective 'whole house' protectors cost
    tens of times less money per protected appliance.

    As for that disk drive, first run manufacturer's
    comprehensive diagnostic (but do not execute any write
    functions) to learn about anomalies in hardware. Without hard
    facts, then responses can only be speculation.


    Jon Davis wrote:
    > I not only have surge protection but in fact I have a UPS.
    >
    > If you think the hard drive has "gone out", why would it work
    > fine during normal use for days, but then go bad at reboot?
    >
    > Jon
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    I have had problems similar to those you describe, though not quite so
    severe, which I eventually tracked down to a bad SRAM DIMM (a number
    of bits were stuck "on"). Presumably the bad RAM chip resulted in bad
    data being written to the drive. Worth checking!

    On Fri, 14 May 2004 17:10:40 -0700, "Jon Davis"
    <jon@REMOVE.ME.jondavis.net> wrote:

    >I have a workstation I built with Windows XP Pro running on it. Every time I
    >reboot, before rebooting everything is a-ok, but after rebooting it starts
    >up with the hard drive corrupted. I have to make sometimes as many as four
    >passes of bootup disk check (a reboot each time) before I can get it to boot
    >successfully without errors. Repeat at next manual reboot... !
    >
    >What is the cause of this? I've checked the voltage going to the power
    >supply, it's 117 volts, which is fine. I have not yet checked the voltage
    >going into the hard drive from the power supply, but I don't know how to do
    >that.
    >
    >Anything else I can do? I am stumped!
    >
    >Jon
    >

    Please respond to the Newsgroup, so that others may benefit from the exchange.
    Peter R. Fletcher
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