Building my own PC -- hardware advice needed

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

Hi,

I am going to build my own PC -- first time I've done this. My main use of
the PC that requires power and speed is Photoshop CS. I will not do any
gaming or anything else that requires 3D graphics.

Having had two PCs with ASUS motherboards that worked very well, I will
stick with ASUS.

Here's what I'm planning:

Intel P4 3.0 Ghz CPU
Matrox G450 graphic card (perfect for Photoshop)
2 -- Western Digital WD1200JB EIDE drives (I have these already)
1 -- Plextor CD/DVD burner (I have this already)
Floppy drive
Faxmodem
LAN and Audio built into MB
USB and Firewire ports
Antec case w/350w power supply

My questions concern choice of motherboard and RAM.

The motherboards I'm considering are:

ASUS P4C800-E Deluxe -- 875C chipset -- $169 (at newegg.com)
ASUS P4C800 Deluxe -- 875C chipset -- $163
ASUS P4P800-E Deluxe -- 865PE chipset -- $116

The specs of these three MBs seem almost identical, so I'm wondering if
anyone has experience with these boards who could give me a reason to select
one versus another. I'm not clear on what I'd get with the $169 board that
the $116 board wouldn't give me. In other words, is the extra money worth
spending? (I don't need WiFi which the P4P800-E Deluxe has included.) I am
not clear about the differences between the 875C and 865PE chipsets, and
what those differences, if any, will mean to me as the end user. Also, I
can't tell the difference between the P4C800-E Deluxe and the P4C800 Deluxe.

RAM:
I will buy PC3200 RAM, 1GB or 2GB of RAM -- all of the MBs above will hold 4
DIMMS. Checking Kingston RAM prices on newegg.com, there are several
choices of 1GB (2x512) packages, ranging from ValueRAM at $194 to HyperX at
$282. I know I need to buy matched pairs of DIMMS. I'm not clear on the
difference between the ValueRAM and the HyperX, other than the price. Both
have very similar specs. I want good, fast, stable RAM, but I don't want to
spend any more than I need to. Any help or recommendations?? (I used
Kingston as my example, but Crucial and Corsair have the same range. These
three brands have been recommended to me.)

Thanks for any help, recommendations and comments.

John
39 answers Last reply
More about building hardware advice needed
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    FWIW, I use Photoshop CS with a 865PE based board, P4 3.0 Ghz, 2 GB
    RAM

    On Sat, 12 Jun 2004 21:25:41 -0700, "John Blaustein"
    <nomail@nomail.com> wrote:

    >Hi,
    >
    >I am going to build my own PC -- first time I've done this. My main use of
    >the PC that requires power and speed is Photoshop CS. I will not do any
    >gaming or anything else that requires 3D graphics.
    >
    >Having had two PCs with ASUS motherboards that worked very well, I will
    >stick with ASUS.
    >
    >Here's what I'm planning:
    >
    >Intel P4 3.0 Ghz CPU
    >Matrox G450 graphic card (perfect for Photoshop)
    >2 -- Western Digital WD1200JB EIDE drives (I have these already)
    >1 -- Plextor CD/DVD burner (I have this already)
    >Floppy drive
    >Faxmodem
    >LAN and Audio built into MB
    >USB and Firewire ports
    >Antec case w/350w power supply
    >
    >My questions concern choice of motherboard and RAM.
    >
    >The motherboards I'm considering are:
    >
    >ASUS P4C800-E Deluxe -- 875C chipset -- $169 (at newegg.com)
    >ASUS P4C800 Deluxe -- 875C chipset -- $163
    >ASUS P4P800-E Deluxe -- 865PE chipset -- $116
    >
    >The specs of these three MBs seem almost identical, so I'm wondering if
    >anyone has experience with these boards who could give me a reason to select
    >one versus another. I'm not clear on what I'd get with the $169 board that
    >the $116 board wouldn't give me. In other words, is the extra money worth
    >spending? (I don't need WiFi which the P4P800-E Deluxe has included.) I am
    >not clear about the differences between the 875C and 865PE chipsets, and
    >what those differences, if any, will mean to me as the end user. Also, I
    >can't tell the difference between the P4C800-E Deluxe and the P4C800 Deluxe.
    >
    >RAM:
    >I will buy PC3200 RAM, 1GB or 2GB of RAM -- all of the MBs above will hold 4
    >DIMMS. Checking Kingston RAM prices on newegg.com, there are several
    >choices of 1GB (2x512) packages, ranging from ValueRAM at $194 to HyperX at
    >$282. I know I need to buy matched pairs of DIMMS. I'm not clear on the
    >difference between the ValueRAM and the HyperX, other than the price. Both
    >have very similar specs. I want good, fast, stable RAM, but I don't want to
    >spend any more than I need to. Any help or recommendations?? (I used
    >Kingston as my example, but Crucial and Corsair have the same range. These
    >three brands have been recommended to me.)
    >
    >Thanks for any help, recommendations and comments.
    >
    >John
    >
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Forgot to mention I use a Matrox G550

    On Sun, 13 Jun 2004 04:58:13 GMT, Fred 2 <Fred_2@anon.com> wrote:

    >
    >FWIW, I use Photoshop CS with a 865PE based board, P4 3.0 Ghz, 2 GB
    >RAM
    >
    >On Sat, 12 Jun 2004 21:25:41 -0700, "John Blaustein"
    ><nomail@nomail.com> wrote:
    >
    >>Hi,
    >>
    >>I am going to build my own PC -- first time I've done this. My main use of
    >>the PC that requires power and speed is Photoshop CS. I will not do any
    >>gaming or anything else that requires 3D graphics.
    >>
    >>Having had two PCs with ASUS motherboards that worked very well, I will
    >>stick with ASUS.
    >>
    >>Here's what I'm planning:
    >>
    >>Intel P4 3.0 Ghz CPU
    >>Matrox G450 graphic card (perfect for Photoshop)
    >>2 -- Western Digital WD1200JB EIDE drives (I have these already)
    >>1 -- Plextor CD/DVD burner (I have this already)
    >>Floppy drive
    >>Faxmodem
    >>LAN and Audio built into MB
    >>USB and Firewire ports
    >>Antec case w/350w power supply
    >>
    >>My questions concern choice of motherboard and RAM.
    >>
    >>The motherboards I'm considering are:
    >>
    >>ASUS P4C800-E Deluxe -- 875C chipset -- $169 (at newegg.com)
    >>ASUS P4C800 Deluxe -- 875C chipset -- $163
    >>ASUS P4P800-E Deluxe -- 865PE chipset -- $116
    >>
    >>The specs of these three MBs seem almost identical, so I'm wondering if
    >>anyone has experience with these boards who could give me a reason to select
    >>one versus another. I'm not clear on what I'd get with the $169 board that
    >>the $116 board wouldn't give me. In other words, is the extra money worth
    >>spending? (I don't need WiFi which the P4P800-E Deluxe has included.) I am
    >>not clear about the differences between the 875C and 865PE chipsets, and
    >>what those differences, if any, will mean to me as the end user. Also, I
    >>can't tell the difference between the P4C800-E Deluxe and the P4C800 Deluxe.
    >>
    >>RAM:
    >>I will buy PC3200 RAM, 1GB or 2GB of RAM -- all of the MBs above will hold 4
    >>DIMMS. Checking Kingston RAM prices on newegg.com, there are several
    >>choices of 1GB (2x512) packages, ranging from ValueRAM at $194 to HyperX at
    >>$282. I know I need to buy matched pairs of DIMMS. I'm not clear on the
    >>difference between the ValueRAM and the HyperX, other than the price. Both
    >>have very similar specs. I want good, fast, stable RAM, but I don't want to
    >>spend any more than I need to. Any help or recommendations?? (I used
    >>Kingston as my example, but Crucial and Corsair have the same range. These
    >>three brands have been recommended to me.)
    >>
    >>Thanks for any help, recommendations and comments.
    >>
    >>John
    >>
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Thanks, Fred. Looks like I'm on the right track.,

    Which brand/model RAM do you use?

    John
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Kingston

    On Sat, 12 Jun 2004 22:22:25 -0700, "John Blaustein"
    <nomail@nomail.com> wrote:

    >Thanks, Fred. Looks like I'm on the right track.,
    >
    >Which brand/model RAM do you use?
    >
    >John
    >
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Are you planing to buy the P4 3.0C (northwood core) or the new P4 3.0E
    (prescott core)? The ASUS P4C800 does not support the new prescott chips.
    The P4P800 (865PE chipset) will support either.

    I would recommend any flavor of the P4P800, depending on your needs, along
    with the P4 3.0C. I currently have that same setup and it's rock solid. The
    new P4 prescotts run a lot hotter (I've read reports of 50C idle temps...
    yikes) than the northwoods, for marginally better performance.

    As for mem, I use Corsair Value Select and have never had any probs.

    Good luck with the new rig.

    -phil

    "John Blaustein" <nomail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    news:I6SdnfCcou3WSlbd4p2dnA@lmi.net...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I am going to build my own PC -- first time I've done this. My main use
    > of
    > the PC that requires power and speed is Photoshop CS. I will not do any
    > gaming or anything else that requires 3D graphics.
    >
    > Having had two PCs with ASUS motherboards that worked very well, I will
    > stick with ASUS.
    >
    > Here's what I'm planning:
    >
    > Intel P4 3.0 Ghz CPU
    > Matrox G450 graphic card (perfect for Photoshop)
    > 2 -- Western Digital WD1200JB EIDE drives (I have these already)
    > 1 -- Plextor CD/DVD burner (I have this already)
    > Floppy drive
    > Faxmodem
    > LAN and Audio built into MB
    > USB and Firewire ports
    > Antec case w/350w power supply
    >
    > My questions concern choice of motherboard and RAM.
    >
    > The motherboards I'm considering are:
    >
    > ASUS P4C800-E Deluxe -- 875C chipset -- $169 (at newegg.com)
    > ASUS P4C800 Deluxe -- 875C chipset -- $163
    > ASUS P4P800-E Deluxe -- 865PE chipset -- $116
    >
    > The specs of these three MBs seem almost identical, so I'm wondering if
    > anyone has experience with these boards who could give me a reason to
    > select
    > one versus another. I'm not clear on what I'd get with the $169 board
    > that
    > the $116 board wouldn't give me. In other words, is the extra money worth
    > spending? (I don't need WiFi which the P4P800-E Deluxe has included.) I
    > am
    > not clear about the differences between the 875C and 865PE chipsets, and
    > what those differences, if any, will mean to me as the end user. Also, I
    > can't tell the difference between the P4C800-E Deluxe and the P4C800
    > Deluxe.
    >
    > RAM:
    > I will buy PC3200 RAM, 1GB or 2GB of RAM -- all of the MBs above will hold
    > 4
    > DIMMS. Checking Kingston RAM prices on newegg.com, there are several
    > choices of 1GB (2x512) packages, ranging from ValueRAM at $194 to HyperX
    > at
    > $282. I know I need to buy matched pairs of DIMMS. I'm not clear on the
    > difference between the ValueRAM and the HyperX, other than the price.
    > Both
    > have very similar specs. I want good, fast, stable RAM, but I don't want
    > to
    > spend any more than I need to. Any help or recommendations?? (I used
    > Kingston as my example, but Crucial and Corsair have the same range.
    > These
    > three brands have been recommended to me.)
    >
    > Thanks for any help, recommendations and comments.
    >
    > John
    >
    >
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    "Phil" <phil_essing@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:WI2zc.1754$CD5.63553@weber.videotron.net...
    > The new P4 prescotts run a lot hotter (I've read reports of 50C idle
    temps...
    > yikes) than the northwoods, for marginally better performance.

    From what I have read, the Prescott P4 has marginally worse performance, in
    the vast majority of applications. But since the Prescott P4 runs much
    hotter, the Northwood P4 is the better choice, regardless of applications
    used, IMO.
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Agreed. However, the prescott does out-perform the northwood equivalent in
    *certain* benchmarks, and it lends itself much more to overclocking. That
    being said, I'd still go northwood in a heartbeat.

    -phil

    "QZ" <nothing> wrote in message news:10cpg0ob5vbe4af@corp.supernews.com...
    > "Phil" <phil_essing@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:WI2zc.1754$CD5.63553@weber.videotron.net...
    >> The new P4 prescotts run a lot hotter (I've read reports of 50C idle
    > temps...
    >> yikes) than the northwoods, for marginally better performance.
    >
    > From what I have read, the Prescott P4 has marginally worse performance,
    > in
    > the vast majority of applications. But since the Prescott P4 runs much
    > hotter, the Northwood P4 is the better choice, regardless of applications
    > used, IMO.
    >
    >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Phil...

    I appreciate the recommendation. I was planning on the 3.0C. I am now
    leaning towards the P4P800-E Deluxe along with the 3.0C. On a Photoshop
    forum, someone suggested getting the 2.8 CPU -- I guess the performance
    difference between 2.8 and 3.0 is negligible, but the cost savings is
    measurable. I'll check it out.

    I'll look at the Corsair Value Select memory. Thanks!

    John

    "Phil" <phil_essing@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:WI2zc.1754$CD5.63553@weber.videotron.net...
    > Are you planing to buy the P4 3.0C (northwood core) or the new P4 3.0E
    > (prescott core)? The ASUS P4C800 does not support the new prescott chips.
    > The P4P800 (865PE chipset) will support either.
    >
    > I would recommend any flavor of the P4P800, depending on your needs, along
    > with the P4 3.0C. I currently have that same setup and it's rock solid.
    The
    > new P4 prescotts run a lot hotter (I've read reports of 50C idle temps...
    > yikes) than the northwoods, for marginally better performance.
    >
    > As for mem, I use Corsair Value Select and have never had any probs.
    >
    > Good luck with the new rig.
    >
    > -phil
    >
    > "John Blaustein" <nomail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > news:I6SdnfCcou3WSlbd4p2dnA@lmi.net...
    > > Hi,
    > >
    > > I am going to build my own PC -- first time I've done this. My main use
    > > of
    > > the PC that requires power and speed is Photoshop CS. I will not do any
    > > gaming or anything else that requires 3D graphics.
    > >
    > > Having had two PCs with ASUS motherboards that worked very well, I will
    > > stick with ASUS.
    > >
    > > Here's what I'm planning:
    > >
    > > Intel P4 3.0 Ghz CPU
    > > Matrox G450 graphic card (perfect for Photoshop)
    > > 2 -- Western Digital WD1200JB EIDE drives (I have these already)
    > > 1 -- Plextor CD/DVD burner (I have this already)
    > > Floppy drive
    > > Faxmodem
    > > LAN and Audio built into MB
    > > USB and Firewire ports
    > > Antec case w/350w power supply
    > >
    > > My questions concern choice of motherboard and RAM.
    > >
    > > The motherboards I'm considering are:
    > >
    > > ASUS P4C800-E Deluxe -- 875C chipset -- $169 (at newegg.com)
    > > ASUS P4C800 Deluxe -- 875C chipset -- $163
    > > ASUS P4P800-E Deluxe -- 865PE chipset -- $116
    > >
    > > The specs of these three MBs seem almost identical, so I'm wondering if
    > > anyone has experience with these boards who could give me a reason to
    > > select
    > > one versus another. I'm not clear on what I'd get with the $169 board
    > > that
    > > the $116 board wouldn't give me. In other words, is the extra money
    worth
    > > spending? (I don't need WiFi which the P4P800-E Deluxe has included.)
    I
    > > am
    > > not clear about the differences between the 875C and 865PE chipsets, and
    > > what those differences, if any, will mean to me as the end user. Also,
    I
    > > can't tell the difference between the P4C800-E Deluxe and the P4C800
    > > Deluxe.
    > >
    > > RAM:
    > > I will buy PC3200 RAM, 1GB or 2GB of RAM -- all of the MBs above will
    hold
    > > 4
    > > DIMMS. Checking Kingston RAM prices on newegg.com, there are several
    > > choices of 1GB (2x512) packages, ranging from ValueRAM at $194 to HyperX
    > > at
    > > $282. I know I need to buy matched pairs of DIMMS. I'm not clear on
    the
    > > difference between the ValueRAM and the HyperX, other than the price.
    > > Both
    > > have very similar specs. I want good, fast, stable RAM, but I don't
    want
    > > to
    > > spend any more than I need to. Any help or recommendations?? (I used
    > > Kingston as my example, but Crucial and Corsair have the same range.
    > > These
    > > three brands have been recommended to me.)
    > >
    > > Thanks for any help, recommendations and comments.
    > >
    > > John
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Hi,

    The major difference between P4C800 and P4P800 is:
    C has ECC RAM capability and uses Intel 875P chipset with integrated gigabit
    lan (CSA) on chip.
    P does not so costs less.

    If you want server class reliability - 24 x 7, then consider ECC Ram. IF you
    don't then save the dosh.

    The P4P asus is quite comparable to the P4C in that Asus has managed to
    stretch out the performance (PAT).

    Seldom do people need or will they notice the difference between the two, so
    you may as well save some dosh and use it elsewhere.

    If you can get away with the kingston RAM then that is worth the effort too
    since it is lower cost. If you are not going to overclock or want to stretch
    the last few percent of performance out of the motherboard, then the more
    expensive ram is just that - more expensive. If you can & if you are going
    to get 2GB then get it in one go from one retailer that will guarantee it
    will work in the motherboard - this could save you a lot of pain otherwise.
    Remember, 10% performance difference is not noticeable. For all the
    differences you might get 3 - 4% without overclocking (IE tighter memory
    timings).

    HTH
    - Tim


    "John Blaustein" <nomail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    news:Lfudndky2c8CeVbdRVn-vA@lmi.net...
    > Thanks, Fred. Looks like I'm on the right track.,
    >
    > Which brand/model RAM do you use?
    >
    > John
    >
    >
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <cah8gf$nme$1@lust.ihug.co.nz>, "Tim" <Tim@NoSpam.com> wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > The major difference between P4C800 and P4P800 is:
    > C has ECC RAM capability and uses Intel 875P chipset with integrated gigabit
    > lan (CSA) on chip.
    > P does not so costs less.
    >
    > If you want server class reliability - 24 x 7, then consider ECC Ram. IF you
    > don't then save the dosh.
    >
    > The P4P asus is quite comparable to the P4C in that Asus has managed to
    > stretch out the performance (PAT).
    >
    > Seldom do people need or will they notice the difference between the two, so
    > you may as well save some dosh and use it elsewhere.
    >
    > If you can get away with the kingston RAM then that is worth the effort too
    > since it is lower cost. If you are not going to overclock or want to stretch
    > the last few percent of performance out of the motherboard, then the more
    > expensive ram is just that - more expensive. If you can & if you are going
    > to get 2GB then get it in one go from one retailer that will guarantee it
    > will work in the motherboard - this could save you a lot of pain otherwise.
    > Remember, 10% performance difference is not noticeable. For all the
    > differences you might get 3 - 4% without overclocking (IE tighter memory
    > timings).
    >
    > HTH
    > - Tim
    >
    ASUS P4C800-E Deluxe -- 875C chipset -- $169 (at newegg.com)
    ASUS P4C800 Deluxe -- 875C chipset -- $163
    ASUS P4P800-E Deluxe -- 865PE chipset -- $116

    The P4C800-E Lan chip is on a private bus. If you are building a
    server, then this board can potentially give faster I/O, as the
    disks and the Lan are on different busses. That doesn't sound
    important to you right now.

    In terms of chipset differences, the 875 and 865 are the same
    die, as far as I know. The chips are sorted at the fab, and the
    ones with a faster memory path become 875, and the next bin is
    865PE. Below that is a bin for something like 848P. Very early
    865PEs performed as well as the 875, but Intel now has the binning
    going quite well, so there is one outstanding issue with the 865PE.

    The 875 has official support for PAT, which is a shortening of
    the memory access path, under synchronous conditions. The motherboard
    manufacturers figured out a way to trigger PAT behavior for the
    865PE, which reduces the differences between the boards. For more
    info, visit the forums of Abxzone.com and search for "ctiaw", a
    utility that claims to be able to read the status of this feature,
    while in Windows. For Photoshop, PAT might give you an increase
    in memory performance, especially if you have CAS2 memory.

    ftp://download.intel.com/design/chipsets/applnots/25273001.pdf (pg.6)

    One issue mentioned on Abxzone, is video artifacts at high overclock,
    in 1:1 FSB:MEM mode on the P4P800. For example, if you boost the
    FSB clock from 200MHz to 250MHz, and plan on using PC4000 memory
    running at DDR500 to match the FSB, then the AGP card on the P4P800
    might see some effects on the screen that shouldn't be there.
    Searching for P4P800 and artifacts on Abxzone, will dig up a thread
    that polled the users as to what percentage of users have the problem.

    This isn't likely to affect you, due to your wish to have 2GB of
    memory. Four sticks of double sided 512MB DIMMs can manage about
    DDR440 (a 10% overclock at 1:1), so if you were to buy (4) PC4000
    memories, they could not be run at their full speed potential.
    Since the memory bus speed has to be reduced for that much memory
    to work error free, you are more likely to be operating the motherboard
    in the region where there aren't any AGP artifacts, so this issue
    won't affect your choice of motherboard.

    Your normal operating mode will be (4) sticks of PC3200 and
    running the processor at stock bus speed (FSB800). If you overclock
    the FSB from 800 to 1000 (25% overclock), then setting the memory
    clock to the "DDR333" setting, puts the actual memory speed
    at a 5:4 ratio with the FSB, so it actually runs at DDR400 and
    is exactly in spec again. So, anywhere between 0% to 25%
    overclock is possible on either board without issues, using the
    5:4 divider for FSB:MEM caused by selecting "DDR333" in the BIOS.

    Running memory faster than PC3200, with four sticks and a 1:1
    FSB:MEM clock ratio, will give faster memory bandwidth performance,
    but once you get to a certain level, you would be better off buying
    one of the P4C800 boards. It is hard to say whether four sticks
    of double sided memory can be driven fast enough to trigger the
    P4P800 artifact bug. If you are not an overclocker, just buy
    the cheapest one that has the peripheral interfaces you want.

    On the memory front, there was an article on Tomshardware.com,
    comparing CAS2, CAS2.5, and CAS3 memories at PC3200 or higher
    rates. Winrar is one of the few applications that benefitted from
    a lower CAS memory. This article will help define the benefit
    you gain from spending the extra money on low CAS memory. A
    professional Photoshop user wouldn't hesitate to buy something
    like this, as time is money. But you could also spend the money
    on a faster disk subsystem, if you find your designs are so large,
    that storing them to disk is taking a measurable time. A couple
    of SATA Raptors in RAID stripe off the ICH5R Southbridge, would
    make a wonderful scratch disk.

    http://www6.tomshardware.com/motherboard/20040119/index-09.html#application_benchmarks

    HTH,
    Paul

    >
    > "John Blaustein" <nomail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > news:Lfudndky2c8CeVbdRVn-vA@lmi.net...
    > > Thanks, Fred. Looks like I'm on the right track.,
    > >
    > > Which brand/model RAM do you use?
    > >
    > > John
    > >
    > >
  11. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Paul, Tim and Fred2,

    Thanks to all for such thorough responses to my post. You've taught me a
    lot, and now I think I can make a somewhat educated decision.

    I spoke to a guy at ASUS sales and he said to use non-ECC memory. He also
    said they recommend Kingston, Crucial, Samsung and Corsair RAM.

    I don't plan to overclock.

    John
  12. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    On Sun, 13 Jun 2004 07:40:23 -0700, "John Blaustein"
    <nomail@nomail.com> wrote:

    > I spoke to a guy at ASUS sales and he said to use non-ECC memory.

    Why?
  13. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Ken,

    As I recall, the ASUS sales guy said those two MoBo's don't support ECC
    memory.

    John

    "Ken" <___ken3@telia.com> wrote in message
    news:ujgpc0lqem7isqf32vpkeqfo2j8okdagnk@4ax.com...
    > On Sun, 13 Jun 2004 07:40:23 -0700, "John Blaustein"
    > <nomail@nomail.com> wrote:
    >
    > > I spoke to a guy at ASUS sales and he said to use non-ECC memory.
    >
    > Why?
    >
  14. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    "John Blaustein" <nomail@nomail.com> wrote in message news:<I6SdnfCcou3WSlbd4p2dnA@lmi.net>...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I am going to build my own PC -- first time I've done this. My main use of
    > the PC that requires power and speed is Photoshop CS. I will not do any
    > gaming or anything else that requires 3D graphics.
    >
    > Having had two PCs with ASUS motherboards that worked very well, I will
    > stick with ASUS.
    >
    > Here's what I'm planning:
    >
    > Intel P4 3.0 Ghz CPU
    > Matrox G450 graphic card (perfect for Photoshop)
    > 2 -- Western Digital WD1200JB EIDE drives (I have these already)
    > 1 -- Plextor CD/DVD burner (I have this already)
    > Floppy drive
    > Faxmodem
    > LAN and Audio built into MB
    > USB and Firewire ports
    > Antec case w/350w power supply
    >
    > My questions concern choice of motherboard and RAM.
    >
    > The motherboards I'm considering are:
    >
    > ASUS P4C800-E Deluxe -- 875C chipset -- $169 (at newegg.com)
    > ASUS P4C800 Deluxe -- 875C chipset -- $163
    > ASUS P4P800-E Deluxe -- 865PE chipset -- $116
    >
    > The specs of these three MBs seem almost identical, so I'm wondering if
    > anyone has experience with these boards who could give me a reason to select
    > one versus another. I'm not clear on what I'd get with the $169 board that
    > the $116 board wouldn't give me. In other words, is the extra money worth
    > spending? (I don't need WiFi which the P4P800-E Deluxe has included.) I am
    > not clear about the differences between the 875C and 865PE chipsets, and
    > what those differences, if any, will mean to me as the end user. Also, I
    > can't tell the difference between the P4C800-E Deluxe and the P4C800 Deluxe.
    >
    > RAM:
    > I will buy PC3200 RAM, 1GB or 2GB of RAM -- all of the MBs above will hold 4
    > DIMMS. Checking Kingston RAM prices on newegg.com, there are several
    > choices of 1GB (2x512) packages, ranging from ValueRAM at $194 to HyperX at
    > $282. I know I need to buy matched pairs of DIMMS. I'm not clear on the
    > difference between the ValueRAM and the HyperX, other than the price. Both
    > have very similar specs. I want good, fast, stable RAM, but I don't want to
    > spend any more than I need to. Any help or recommendations?? (I used
    > Kingston as my example, but Crucial and Corsair have the same range. These
    > three brands have been recommended to me.)
    >
    > Thanks for any help, recommendations and comments.
    >
    > John

    John,

    Make it easy on yourself and pick up one of the Dell Poweredge 400SC
    "servers" with the free p4 upgrade for $349. Toss in some RAM and
    your parts on hand and you will have a good machine and probally save
    some cash.
  15. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    On Sun, 13 Jun 2004 19:55:04 -0700, "John Blaustein"
    <nomail@nomail.com> wrote:

    > As I recall, the ASUS sales guy said those two MoBo's
    > don't support ECC memory.


    ASUS P4C800-E Deluxe -- 875C chipset ECC-memory.
    ASUS P4C800 Deluxe -- 875C chipset ECC-memory.
    ASUS P4P800-E Deluxe -- 865PE chipset non-ECC-memory.

    http://www.asus.com/prog/spec.asp?m=P4C800-E%20Deluxe&langs=01
    http://www.asus.com/prog/spec.asp?m=P4C800%20Deluxe&langs=01
    http://www.asus.com/prog/spec.asp?m=P4P800-E%20Deluxe&langs=01

    This MoBo's with 875C chipset support ECC-memory.
  16. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Lamont,

    OK... I'll take a look at the Dell site. Thanks for the tip. I must say,
    however, that I've been looking forward to the "do-it-yourself" PC for a
    while, so I may just stick to my plan even if it costs a few buck more.
    I've had fun researching all the components and trying to learn as much as I
    can about chipsets and motherboards, types of RAM, RAID, etc.

    John

    "Lamont" <drblahut@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:3149eb71.0406140928.45e92698@posting.google.com...
    >
    > Make it easy on yourself and pick up one of the Dell Poweredge 400SC
    > "servers" with the free p4 upgrade for $349. Toss in some RAM and
    > your parts on hand and you will have a good machine and probally save
    > some cash.
  17. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    On Mon, 14 Jun 2004, John Blaustein wrote:

    >OK... I'll take a look at the Dell site. Thanks for the tip. I must say,
    >however, that I've been looking forward to the "do-it-yourself" PC for a
    >while, so I may just stick to my plan even if it costs a few buck more.
    >I've had fun researching all the components and trying to learn as much as I
    >can about chipsets and motherboards, types of RAM, RAID, etc.

    I think you're right. One learns a *lot* more from putting things
    together oneself.

    David

    --
    +-------------------------------------------------------+
    | Internet: david.rance@rance.org.uk | writing from |
    | Fidonet: David Rance 2:252/110 | Caversham, |
    | BBS: telnet://mesnil.demon.co.uk | Reading, UK |
    +-------------------------------------------------------+
  18. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Hey guys...

    Am I correct that I can use both an EIDE and an SATA drive with the
    motherboards we've been discussing here -- P4P800-E Deluxe and P4C800-E
    Deluxe? I'm now thinking I will get an SATA drive for my C: drive and use
    one of my existing EIDE drives as D:. In other words, can one combine drive
    types, or do they all have to be either EIDE or SATA?

    Also... what is the issue with hard drives over 137GB? Will Windows XP
    recognize a 160GB or 200GB drive, or will I have to partition a drive that
    size into partitions each of which are less than 137GB?

    As before... thanks for your advice and help.

    John
  19. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    "Phil" <phil_essing@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:WI2zc.1754$CD5.63553@weber.videotron.net...
    > Are you planing to buy the P4 3.0C (northwood core) or the new P4 3.0E
    > (prescott core)? The ASUS P4C800 does not support the new prescott chips.
    > The P4P800 (865PE chipset) will support either.

    Just a point of clarification, the P4C800-E Deluxe does claim to support the
    Prescott core CPUs, at least according to the specifications section of that
    motherboard on Asus' web site.

    Whether you were referring to the P4C800 or the P4C800-E, I'm not sure.
    It's mildly annoying that Asus uses such similar model numbers for boards
    with some significant capabilities differences, especially when trying to
    research them on the 'net and hitting sites/threads that refer to them in
    shorthand form.
  20. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Yup, you can use SATA and IDE in a P4P800
    John. I use a sata as a 3rd master hdd here (D) and a 80 GB IDE partitioned,
    as a master primary hdd as C, on a P4P800 non deluxe.

    No prob at all. Just dont setup RAID in the
    BIOS, if you only use 1 SATA. The P4P800 (well this
    one has 3 masters. (2 IDE, master/primary, and the 2
    SATA slots (which dont use jumpers, BUT have
    a master and primary as well). I know nothing about
    the P4C800, BUT I would say you can use BOTH IDE
    and SATA on that too. It shouldn't matter what brand/model of mobo it is. If
    a mobo has BOTH IDE
    and SATA, BOTH can be used. You should be able
    to install XP, on a SATA if you do a clean install.

    It'll format then install XP on it.


    "John Blaustein" <nomail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    news:DJWdnc3EMZbEwFLdRVn-sw@lmi.net...
    > Hey guys...
    >
    > Am I correct that I can use both an EIDE and an SATA drive with the
    > motherboards we've been discussing here -- P4P800-E Deluxe and P4C800-E
    > Deluxe? I'm now thinking I will get an SATA drive for my C: drive and use
    > one of my existing EIDE drives as D:. In other words, can one combine
    drive
    > types, or do they all have to be either EIDE or SATA?
    >
    > Also... what is the issue with hard drives over 137GB? Will Windows XP
    > recognize a 160GB or 200GB drive, or will I have to partition a drive that
    > size into partitions each of which are less than 137GB?
    >
    > As before... thanks for your advice and help.
    >
    > John
    >
    >
  21. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    I think SP1 needs to be installed for it to recognise
    more than 137mb properly. And there is a writeup
    on the MS site about some kind of registry fix

    You may not have to do BOTH of the one. SP1
    maybe enough. I haven't actually tried it. The biggest
    hdd here atm is only 120GB

    "John Blaustein" <nomail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    news:DJWdnc3EMZbEwFLdRVn-sw@lmi.net...
    > Hey guys...
    >
    > Am I correct that I can use both an EIDE and an SATA drive with the
    > motherboards we've been discussing here -- P4P800-E Deluxe and P4C800-E
    > Deluxe? I'm now thinking I will get an SATA drive for my C: drive and use
    > one of my existing EIDE drives as D:. In other words, can one combine
    drive
    > types, or do they all have to be either EIDE or SATA?
    >
    > Also... what is the issue with hard drives over 137GB? Will Windows XP
    > recognize a 160GB or 200GB drive, or will I have to partition a drive that
    > size into partitions each of which are less than 137GB?
    >
    > As before... thanks for your advice and help.
    >
    > John
    >
    >
  22. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Paul,

    Thanks for both messages -- this one and the other regarding using EIDE and
    SATA drives at the same time.

    I'll look at the MS site. My thinking is that 120GB is large enough for any
    one drive. In case of a crash, I'd hate to lose more than that at one time.

    John

    "Paul" <noone@home.com> wrote in message
    news:cap42u$41t$1@lust.ihug.co.nz...
    > I think SP1 needs to be installed for it to recognise
    > more than 137mb properly. And there is a writeup
    > on the MS site about some kind of registry fix
    >
    > You may not have to do BOTH of the one. SP1
    > maybe enough. I haven't actually tried it. The biggest
    > hdd here atm is only 120GB
    >
    > "John Blaustein" <nomail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > news:DJWdnc3EMZbEwFLdRVn-sw@lmi.net...
    > > Hey guys...
    > >
    > > Am I correct that I can use both an EIDE and an SATA drive with the
    > > motherboards we've been discussing here -- P4P800-E Deluxe and P4C800-E
    > > Deluxe? I'm now thinking I will get an SATA drive for my C: drive and
    use
    > > one of my existing EIDE drives as D:. In other words, can one combine
    > drive
    > > types, or do they all have to be either EIDE or SATA?
    > >
    > > Also... what is the issue with hard drives over 137GB? Will Windows XP
    > > recognize a 160GB or 200GB drive, or will I have to partition a drive
    that
    > > size into partitions each of which are less than 137GB?
    > >
    > > As before... thanks for your advice and help.
    > >
    > > John
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  23. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    On Wed, 16 Jun 2004, Shawn Barnhart wrote:

    >Just a point of clarification, the P4C800-E Deluxe does claim to support the
    >Prescott core CPUs, at least according to the specifications section of that
    >motherboard on Asus' web site.
    >
    >Whether you were referring to the P4C800 or the P4C800-E, I'm not sure.
    >It's mildly annoying that Asus uses such similar model numbers for boards
    >with some significant capabilities differences, especially when trying to
    >research them on the 'net and hitting sites/threads that refer to them in
    >shorthand form.

    According to the information on the Asus website, all three of the
    P4C800 series (P4C800, P4C800 de luxe and P4C800-E de luxe) support the
    new Prescott CPUs. In fact, I spent an hour or two earlier today trying
    to work out just what the differences were between the models and was
    going to post a question about it.

    As far as I can see, the difference between P4C800 and P4C800 de luxe is
    that the latter adds a Promise 20378 RAID controller. The P4C800-E de
    luxe adds, on top of that, an Intel Ethernet controller (as opposed to a
    3com in the other models).

    Can anyone confirm that this is a reasonable summary? Have I missed
    anything out?

    David
    --
    +-------------------------------------------------------+
    | Internet: david.rance@rance.org.uk | writing from |
    | Fidonet: David Rance 2:252/110 | Caversham, |
    | BBS: telnet://mesnil.demon.co.uk | Reading, UK |
    +-------------------------------------------------------+
  24. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <4YZzBiBfSL0AFwsA@mesnil.demon.co.uk>, David Rance
    <david.rance@SPAMOFFrance.org.uk> wrote:

    > On Wed, 16 Jun 2004, Shawn Barnhart wrote:
    >
    > >Just a point of clarification, the P4C800-E Deluxe does claim to support the
    > >Prescott core CPUs, at least according to the specifications section of that
    > >motherboard on Asus' web site.
    > >
    > >Whether you were referring to the P4C800 or the P4C800-E, I'm not sure.
    > >It's mildly annoying that Asus uses such similar model numbers for boards
    > >with some significant capabilities differences, especially when trying to
    > >research them on the 'net and hitting sites/threads that refer to them in
    > >shorthand form.
    >
    > According to the information on the Asus website, all three of the
    > P4C800 series (P4C800, P4C800 de luxe and P4C800-E de luxe) support the
    > new Prescott CPUs. In fact, I spent an hour or two earlier today trying
    > to work out just what the differences were between the models and was
    > going to post a question about it.
    >
    > As far as I can see, the difference between P4C800 and P4C800 de luxe is
    > that the latter adds a Promise 20378 RAID controller. The P4C800-E de
    > luxe adds, on top of that, an Intel Ethernet controller (as opposed to a
    > 3com in the other models).
    >
    > Can anyone confirm that this is a reasonable summary? Have I missed
    > anything out?
    >
    > David

    There is a summary at the bottom of this web page.

    http://www.asuscom.de/support/FAQ/faq117_P4X800.htm

    Paul
  25. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    No worries John. Hope you get one up and running
    soon!

    Cya

    "John Blaustein" <nomail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    news:2padnWmEXIYZ0U3dRVn-hA@lmi.net...
    > Paul,
    >
    > Thanks for both messages -- this one and the other regarding using EIDE
    and
    > SATA drives at the same time.
    >
    > I'll look at the MS site. My thinking is that 120GB is large enough for
    any
    > one drive. In case of a crash, I'd hate to lose more than that at one
    time.
    >
    > John
    >
    > "Paul" <noone@home.com> wrote in message
    > news:cap42u$41t$1@lust.ihug.co.nz...
    > > I think SP1 needs to be installed for it to recognise
    > > more than 137mb properly. And there is a writeup
    > > on the MS site about some kind of registry fix
    > >
    > > You may not have to do BOTH of the one. SP1
    > > maybe enough. I haven't actually tried it. The biggest
    > > hdd here atm is only 120GB
    > >
    > > "John Blaustein" <nomail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > > news:DJWdnc3EMZbEwFLdRVn-sw@lmi.net...
    > > > Hey guys...
    > > >
    > > > Am I correct that I can use both an EIDE and an SATA drive with the
    > > > motherboards we've been discussing here -- P4P800-E Deluxe and
    P4C800-E
    > > > Deluxe? I'm now thinking I will get an SATA drive for my C: drive and
    > use
    > > > one of my existing EIDE drives as D:. In other words, can one combine
    > > drive
    > > > types, or do they all have to be either EIDE or SATA?
    > > >
    > > > Also... what is the issue with hard drives over 137GB? Will Windows
    XP
    > > > recognize a 160GB or 200GB drive, or will I have to partition a drive
    > that
    > > > size into partitions each of which are less than 137GB?
    > > >
    > > > As before... thanks for your advice and help.
    > > >
    > > > John
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  26. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    On Wed, 16 Jun 2004, Paul wrote:

    >> According to the information on the Asus website, all three of the
    >> P4C800 series (P4C800, P4C800 de luxe and P4C800-E de luxe) support the
    >> new Prescott CPUs. In fact, I spent an hour or two earlier today trying
    >> to work out just what the differences were between the models and was
    >> going to post a question about it.
    >>
    >> As far as I can see, the difference between P4C800 and P4C800 de luxe is
    >> that the latter adds a Promise 20378 RAID controller. The P4C800-E de
    >> luxe adds, on top of that, an Intel Ethernet controller (as opposed to a
    >> 3com in the other models).
    >>
    >> Can anyone confirm that this is a reasonable summary? Have I missed
    >> anything out?
    >
    >There is a summary at the bottom of this web page.
    >
    >http://www.asuscom.de/support/FAQ/faq117_P4X800.htm

    Many thanks for that, Paul. Yes, I missed out the Firewire facility on
    the de luxe models.

    What is the value of having an Intel Ethernet controller on the -E
    version as against the 3com. Does it make the extra cost worth it?

    David
    --
    +-------------------------------------------------------+
    | Internet: david.rance@rance.org.uk | writing from |
    | Fidonet: David Rance 2:252/110 | Caversham, |
    | BBS: telnet://mesnil.demon.co.uk | Reading, UK |
    +-------------------------------------------------------+
  27. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    "David Rance" <david.rance@SPAMOFFrance.org.uk> wrote in message
    news:eX0KStAqnU0AFw5+@mesnil.demon.co.uk...


    > What is the value of having an Intel Ethernet controller on the -E
    > version as against the 3com. Does it make the extra cost worth it?

    My understanding is the Intel controller is on a seperate/private bus. I
    don't know how much that means for performance, though. For single-PC
    setups with broadband, probably zero, for LAN users pumping around a bunch
    of data to the network while they process info, maybe some.
  28. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Hello...

    I'm the guy that started this thread, and I'll repeat that I really
    appreciate all the good information shared here.

    I ended up buying the following from newegg:

    P4P800-E Deluxe
    P4 3.0c, 800 FSB
    Mushkin RAM -- 4x512
    WD120GB SATA (other drives to be added later from existing system)
    Antec SLK3700-BQE case w/extra 120mm fan
    Zalman CNPS7000A-AlCu CPU cooler

    Unfortunately, the Antec case arrived damaged, so I've not been able to put
    it all together yet -- newegg said a replacement will take a week. However,
    I've got the MB ready to go -- mounting the CPU, fan and RAM was easy, even
    though this is the first time for me.

    I've got a few questions...

    Once the hardware is all assembled, I will do a clean install of XP Home
    onto the new SATA drive. Am I correct that all I have to do is set the BIOS
    to boot from my CD drive, boot from the XP disk and it will walk me through
    formatting the new SATA drive and installing XP? The drive I got is OEM, so
    it didn't come with any documentation or installation disks. I looked at
    the WD web site and it looks like I won't need any WD software since I'm
    formatting from scratch and doing a clean XP install. Correct?

    Once the system is running, I'd like to do as thorough a diagnostic test as
    possible. Can someone recommend a solid, free, diagnostic program? In
    particular, I want to thoroughly test the RAM. A while ago, I had a bad
    DIMM on my PIII system and it caused data loss of some Photoshop files. (My
    main use of this PC is Photoshop work.) The bad DIMM seemed to be
    intermittant, but I finally nailed down the problem by testing the RAM.

    I know I need to install the ASUS drivers from the ASUS CD once Windows is
    installed. Should I go ahead and load the ASUS utilities for monitoring the
    MB, or is there another (free) utility that you would recommend? Do I have
    to monitor it at all?

    I do not plan to overclock the system or to use RAID. Am I correct that I
    can leave all the BIOS settings at their default? Can I leave all the MB
    jumpers at their default settings?

    John
  29. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    On Wed, 23 Jun 2004 11:39:03 -0700, "John Blaustein"
    <nomail@nomail.com> wrote:

    > Am I correct that all I have to do is set the BIOS
    >to boot from my CD drive, boot from the XP disk and it will walk me through
    >formatting the new SATA drive and installing XP?

    XP doesn't do SATA out of the box so you will need to add SATA drivers
    for your motherboard by hitting F6

    Goggle for F6 SATA XP and you'll see what to do.

    Phil
    --
    spamcop.net address commissioned 18/06/04
    Come on down !
  30. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Phil,

    Will do. Thanks. I sure hope it's not too complicated.

    John

    "Phil Thompson" <phil.thompson@spamcop.net> wrote in message
    news:44sjd0dp2nogvbab031qb2jrj5n61be9cr@4ax.com...
    > On Wed, 23 Jun 2004 11:39:03 -0700, "John Blaustein"
    > <nomail@nomail.com> wrote:
    >
    > > Am I correct that all I have to do is set the BIOS
    > >to boot from my CD drive, boot from the XP disk and it will walk me
    through
    > >formatting the new SATA drive and installing XP?
    >
    > XP doesn't do SATA out of the box so you will need to add SATA drivers
    > for your motherboard by hitting F6
    >
    > Goggle for F6 SATA XP and you'll see what to do.
    >
    > Phil
    > --
    > spamcop.net address commissioned 18/06/04
    > Come on down !
  31. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Phil,

    I haven't been able to assembly my system because of a damaged Antec case.
    However, I researched the SATA/XP issue you raised. On the ASUS CD that
    came with the motherboard, there is a Makedisk.exe program in the
    drivers>promise>387ata folder. I ran that and it put a set of drivers onto
    a floppy. In the WinXP folder on the floppy, I have the following files:

    ptipbm.dll
    ulsata.cat
    ulsata.inf
    ulsata.sys
    vssver.scc

    Now... do you think this is the disk I will need when I power up my P4P800-E
    Deluxe board with the one WD SATA drive attached and start to install XP?
    Will it matter that the XP files are not in the root folder on the floppy?
    I can always copy the XP files to the root folder on the floppy and delete
    everything else. Should I do that?

    One of the links I followed when searching Google for "F6 SATA XP" led me to
    a posting somewhere (can't remember where now) which said that Western
    Digital SATA drivers are recognized by Windows XP, whereas other
    manufacturers aren't. That sounds fishy to me. What do you think?

    Thanks for your help.

    John


    "Phil Thompson" <phil.thompson@spamcop.net> wrote in message
    news:44sjd0dp2nogvbab031qb2jrj5n61be9cr@4ax.com...
    > On Wed, 23 Jun 2004 11:39:03 -0700, "John Blaustein"
    > <nomail@nomail.com> wrote:
    >
    > > Am I correct that all I have to do is set the BIOS
    > >to boot from my CD drive, boot from the XP disk and it will walk me
    through
    > >formatting the new SATA drive and installing XP?
    >
    > XP doesn't do SATA out of the box so you will need to add SATA drivers
    > for your motherboard by hitting F6
    >
    > Goggle for F6 SATA XP and you'll see what to do.
    >
    > Phil
    > --
    > spamcop.net address commissioned 18/06/04
    > Come on down !
  32. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    I have read that the P4P800-e does is not compatible with Antec power
    supplies for some reason. When you do receive your case replacement,
    please post a message about whether or not it works. I am considering a
    similar system. Thanks,

    Edward

    John Blaustein wrote:
    > Hello...
    >
    > I'm the guy that started this thread, and I'll repeat that I really
    > appreciate all the good information shared here.
    >
    > I ended up buying the following from newegg:
    >
    > P4P800-E Deluxe
    > P4 3.0c, 800 FSB
    > Mushkin RAM -- 4x512
    > WD120GB SATA (other drives to be added later from existing system)
    > Antec SLK3700-BQE case w/extra 120mm fan
    > Zalman CNPS7000A-AlCu CPU cooler
    >
    > Unfortunately, the Antec case arrived damaged, so I've not been able to put
    > it all together yet -- newegg said a replacement will take a week. However,
    > I've got the MB ready to go -- mounting the CPU, fan and RAM was easy, even
    > though this is the first time for me.
    >
    > I've got a few questions...
    >
    > Once the hardware is all assembled, I will do a clean install of XP Home
    > onto the new SATA drive. Am I correct that all I have to do is set the BIOS
    > to boot from my CD drive, boot from the XP disk and it will walk me through
    > formatting the new SATA drive and installing XP? The drive I got is OEM, so
    > it didn't come with any documentation or installation disks. I looked at
    > the WD web site and it looks like I won't need any WD software since I'm
    > formatting from scratch and doing a clean XP install. Correct?
    >
    > Once the system is running, I'd like to do as thorough a diagnostic test as
    > possible. Can someone recommend a solid, free, diagnostic program? In
    > particular, I want to thoroughly test the RAM. A while ago, I had a bad
    > DIMM on my PIII system and it caused data loss of some Photoshop files. (My
    > main use of this PC is Photoshop work.) The bad DIMM seemed to be
    > intermittant, but I finally nailed down the problem by testing the RAM.
    >
    > I know I need to install the ASUS drivers from the ASUS CD once Windows is
    > installed. Should I go ahead and load the ASUS utilities for monitoring the
    > MB, or is there another (free) utility that you would recommend? Do I have
    > to monitor it at all?
    >
    > I do not plan to overclock the system or to use RAID. Am I correct that I
    > can leave all the BIOS settings at their default? Can I leave all the MB
    > jumpers at their default settings?
    >
    > John
    >
    >
    >
  33. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    A colleague of mine has a P4P800-E Deluxe, P4 2.8, Antec SLK3700-BQE, Zalman
    CNPS7000A-AiCu and he says it works perfectly. In fact, it was on the basis
    of his experience (and all the posts here) that I decided on my system.

    John


    "Edward" <Edward@nospamatall.com> wrote in message
    news:G8pCc.6990$w3.1131@fe2.texas.rr.com...
    > I have read that the P4P800-e does is not compatible with Antec power
    > supplies for some reason. When you do receive your case replacement,
    > please post a message about whether or not it works. I am considering a
    > similar system. Thanks,
    >
    > Edward
    >
    > John Blaustein wrote:
    > > Hello...
    > >
    > > I'm the guy that started this thread, and I'll repeat that I really
    > > appreciate all the good information shared here.
    > >
    > > I ended up buying the following from newegg:
    > >
    > > P4P800-E Deluxe
    > > P4 3.0c, 800 FSB
    > > Mushkin RAM -- 4x512
    > > WD120GB SATA (other drives to be added later from existing system)
    > > Antec SLK3700-BQE case w/extra 120mm fan
    > > Zalman CNPS7000A-AlCu CPU cooler
    > >
    > > Unfortunately, the Antec case arrived damaged, so I've not been able to
    put
    > > it all together yet -- newegg said a replacement will take a week.
    However,
    > > I've got the MB ready to go -- mounting the CPU, fan and RAM was easy,
    even
    > > though this is the first time for me.
    > >
    > > I've got a few questions...
    > >
    > > Once the hardware is all assembled, I will do a clean install of XP Home
    > > onto the new SATA drive. Am I correct that all I have to do is set the
    BIOS
    > > to boot from my CD drive, boot from the XP disk and it will walk me
    through
    > > formatting the new SATA drive and installing XP? The drive I got is
    OEM, so
    > > it didn't come with any documentation or installation disks. I looked
    at
    > > the WD web site and it looks like I won't need any WD software since I'm
    > > formatting from scratch and doing a clean XP install. Correct?
    > >
    > > Once the system is running, I'd like to do as thorough a diagnostic test
    as
    > > possible. Can someone recommend a solid, free, diagnostic program? In
    > > particular, I want to thoroughly test the RAM. A while ago, I had a bad
    > > DIMM on my PIII system and it caused data loss of some Photoshop files.
    (My
    > > main use of this PC is Photoshop work.) The bad DIMM seemed to be
    > > intermittant, but I finally nailed down the problem by testing the RAM.
    > >
    > > I know I need to install the ASUS drivers from the ASUS CD once Windows
    is
    > > installed. Should I go ahead and load the ASUS utilities for monitoring
    the
    > > MB, or is there another (free) utility that you would recommend? Do I
    have
    > > to monitor it at all?
    > >
    > > I do not plan to overclock the system or to use RAID. Am I correct that
    I
    > > can leave all the BIOS settings at their default? Can I leave all the
    MB
    > > jumpers at their default settings?
    > >
    > > John
    > >
    > >
    > >
    >
  34. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    "David Rance" <david.rance@SPAMOFFrance.org.uk> wrote in message
    news:4YZzBiBfSL0AFwsA@mesnil.demon.co.uk...
    > On Wed, 16 Jun 2004, Shawn Barnhart wrote:
    >
    > >Just a point of clarification, the P4C800-E Deluxe does claim to support
    the
    > >Prescott core CPUs, at least according to the specifications section of
    that
    > >motherboard on Asus' web site.
    > >
    > >Whether you were referring to the P4C800 or the P4C800-E, I'm not sure.
    > >It's mildly annoying that Asus uses such similar model numbers for boards
    > >with some significant capabilities differences, especially when trying to
    > >research them on the 'net and hitting sites/threads that refer to them in
    > >shorthand form.
    >
    > According to the information on the Asus website, all three of the
    > P4C800 series (P4C800, P4C800 de luxe and P4C800-E de luxe) support the
    > new Prescott CPUs. In fact, I spent an hour or two earlier today trying
    > to work out just what the differences were between the models and was
    > going to post a question about it.
    >
    > As far as I can see, the difference between P4C800 and P4C800 de luxe is
    > that the latter adds a Promise 20378 RAID controller. The P4C800-E de
    > luxe adds, on top of that, an Intel Ethernet controller (as opposed to a
    > 3com in the other models).
    >
    > Can anyone confirm that this is a reasonable summary? Have I missed
    > anything out?
    >
    > David

    No Thats pretty much spot on David. The only thing to note with any of these
    boards is that you MUST have Bios ver 1014 or above. If not then the board
    will not even POST as I found out. The only way around it if you have
    recieved a board with an earlier rev and wish to use a Prescott, is to
    install a Northwood/Clereon and flash the bios up ( As I did).

    Regards
    Freddie
  35. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    I use memtest86 (www.memtest86.com) for memory/cpu testing on initial
    boot (special boot floppy test disk is made from the d/l). If I have
    several passes, I then proceed to install OS on HD. Once up and
    running (the OS that is), use prime95 to give you system a heat
    headache.

    There are other free memory testers, docmem is one I also use, but
    memtest86 finds things the other test SW does not find.

    --
    Best regards,
    Kyle
    "John Blaustein" <nomail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    news:UoudnbGUw5vTU0TdRVn-tA@lmi.net...
    | Hello...
    |
    <snip>
    |
    | Once the system is running, I'd like to do as thorough a diagnostic
    test as
    | possible. Can someone recommend a solid, free, diagnostic program?
    In
    | particular, I want to thoroughly test the RAM. A while ago, I had a
    bad
    | DIMM on my PIII system and it caused data loss of some Photoshop
    files. (My
    | main use of this PC is Photoshop work.) The bad DIMM seemed to be
    | intermittant, but I finally nailed down the problem by testing the
    RAM.
  36. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Kyle,

    I downloaded memtest86 and ran it on my current system. That's just what I
    was looking for. I'll check out docmem too. Prime95 looks like more than I
    really need.

    I appreicate your help.

    John

    "Kylesb" <me@privacy.net> wrote in message
    news:2jveobF16ebacU1@uni-berlin.de...
    > I use memtest86 (www.memtest86.com) for memory/cpu testing on initial
    > boot (special boot floppy test disk is made from the d/l). If I have
    > several passes, I then proceed to install OS on HD. Once up and
    > running (the OS that is), use prime95 to give you system a heat
    > headache.
    >
    > There are other free memory testers, docmem is one I also use, but
    > memtest86 finds things the other test SW does not find.
    >
    > --
    > Best regards,
    > Kyle
    > "John Blaustein" <nomail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > news:UoudnbGUw5vTU0TdRVn-tA@lmi.net...
    > | Hello...
    > |
    > <snip>
    > |
    > | Once the system is running, I'd like to do as thorough a diagnostic
    > test as
    > | possible. Can someone recommend a solid, free, diagnostic program?
    > In
    > | particular, I want to thoroughly test the RAM. A while ago, I had a
    > bad
    > | DIMM on my PIII system and it caused data loss of some Photoshop
    > files. (My
    > | main use of this PC is Photoshop work.) The bad DIMM seemed to be
    > | intermittant, but I finally nailed down the problem by testing the
    > RAM.
    >
  37. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    "John Blaustein" <nomail@nomail.com> wrote in message news:<I6SdnfCcou3WSlbd4p2dnA@lmi.net>...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I am going to build my own PC -- first time I've done this. My main use of
    > the PC that requires power and speed is Photoshop CS. I will not do any
    > gaming or anything else that requires 3D graphics.
    >
    > Having had two PCs with ASUS motherboards that worked very well, I will
    > stick with ASUS.
    >
    > Here's what I'm planning:
    >
    > Intel P4 3.0 Ghz CPU
    > Matrox G450 graphic card (perfect for Photoshop)
    > 2 -- Western Digital WD1200JB EIDE drives (I have these already)
    > 1 -- Plextor CD/DVD burner (I have this already)
    > Floppy drive
    > Faxmodem
    > LAN and Audio built into MB
    > USB and Firewire ports
    > Antec case w/350w power supply
    >
    > My questions concern choice of motherboard and RAM.
    >
    > The motherboards I'm considering are:
    >
    > ASUS P4C800-E Deluxe -- 875C chipset -- $169 (at newegg.com)
    > ASUS P4C800 Deluxe -- 875C chipset -- $163
    > ASUS P4P800-E Deluxe -- 865PE chipset -- $116
    >
    > The specs of these three MBs seem almost identical, so I'm wondering if
    > anyone has experience with these boards who could give me a reason to select
    > one versus another. I'm not clear on what I'd get with the $169 board that
    > the $116 board wouldn't give me. In other words, is the extra money worth
    > spending? (I don't need WiFi which the P4P800-E Deluxe has included.) I am
    > not clear about the differences between the 875C and 865PE chipsets, and
    > what those differences, if any, will mean to me as the end user. Also, I
    > can't tell the difference between the P4C800-E Deluxe and the P4C800 Deluxe.
    >
    > RAM:
    > I will buy PC3200 RAM, 1GB or 2GB of RAM -- all of the MBs above will hold 4
    > DIMMS. Checking Kingston RAM prices on newegg.com, there are several
    > choices of 1GB (2x512) packages, ranging from ValueRAM at $194 to HyperX at
    > $282. I know I need to buy matched pairs of DIMMS. I'm not clear on the
    > difference between the ValueRAM and the HyperX, other than the price. Both
    > have very similar specs. I want good, fast, stable RAM, but I don't want to
    > spend any more than I need to. Any help or recommendations?? (I used
    > Kingston as my example, but Crucial and Corsair have the same range. These
    > three brands have been recommended to me.)
    >
    > Thanks for any help, recommendations and comments.
    >
    > John

    Is that Antec an aluminium case? If you're building your own PC, you
    might consider a good quality ALU case with plenty of room inside,
    case fans, and easy to remove drive trays.

    Don't forget to savour that moment when you flick on the PC's power
    button for the first time and everything loads up like a dream.
  38. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    John,

    The Antec case is very sturdy, but I'm not sure it's aluminum. It has all
    the other attributes you mention. Unfortunately, it arrived damaged, but
    I'm expecting a replacement any day and look forward to the moment of truth!

    John


    "John Smith" <warning_I_will_report_all_spam@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:df740488.0406241037.ac98cfd@posting.google.com...

    > Is that Antec an aluminium case? If you're building your own PC, you
    > might consider a good quality ALU case with plenty of room inside,
    > case fans, and easy to remove drive trays.
    >
    > Don't forget to savour that moment when you flick on the PC's power
    > button for the first time and everything loads up like a dream.
  39. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Hi,

    Having started this thread three weeks ago, I wanted to end the thread by
    thanking everyone who helped me along the way. My system is now assembled
    and it booted perfectly the first time. After installing Windows, the sound
    and LAN didn't work, but then I remembered I had to install the ASUS
    drivers. After doing that, along with the supplied Intel driver, everything
    was fine. Also, I had to disable the Promise RAID driver since I'm not
    using RAID.

    The system is as follows:

    P4P800-E Deluxe
    P4 3.0c, 800 FSB
    Mushkin RAM -- 4x512
    WD120GB SATA (other drives to be added later from existing system)
    Antec SLK3700-BQE case w/extra 120mm fan
    Zalman CNPS7000A-AlCu CPU cooler
    Diamond/ATI Radeon 7000
    -- another video card, fax/modem and another HD will be added later from my
    existing system.

    John
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