P4P800-E Deluxe and odd video problem

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

Hi,

I just assembled a new system:

P4P800-E Deluxe
P4 3.0
2GB RAM
WD 120GB SATA drive
CD-RW/DVD

When I first assembled the system, I put a Diamond ATI Radeon 7000 AGP video
card in. It worked perfectly. I have just exchanged the 7000 for a Matrox
G450 AGP card. For some reason, I'm now getting a slight flicker. I have
installed the most current Matrox driver and am using the same resolution,
color depth and refresh rate that I was using on my previous PC with the
same Matrox G450 card.

At the same time I switched the video cards, I switch the Logitech mouse
from PS/2 to USB. I can't imagine that would make a difference... would it?

Are there any setting in the P4P800-E Deluxe BIOS that might be causing
this? I am using the most recent BIOS v.1002.

John
18 answers Last reply
More about p4p800 deluxe video problem
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Further information....

    I now notice that I can "force" the flicker by moving the mouse over a web
    page full of links. As the pointer passes quickly over the links, there is
    a very subtle flicker that occurs and stops the moment the mouse stops
    moving. Any ideas what this is about?

    John


    "John Blaustein" <nomail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    news:OJWdnfOx5qdoS3nd4p2dnA@lmi.net...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I just assembled a new system:
    >
    > P4P800-E Deluxe
    > P4 3.0
    > 2GB RAM
    > WD 120GB SATA drive
    > CD-RW/DVD
    >
    > When I first assembled the system, I put a Diamond ATI Radeon 7000 AGP
    video
    > card in. It worked perfectly. I have just exchanged the 7000 for a
    Matrox
    > G450 AGP card. For some reason, I'm now getting a slight flicker. I have
    > installed the most current Matrox driver and am using the same resolution,
    > color depth and refresh rate that I was using on my previous PC with the
    > same Matrox G450 card.
    >
    > At the same time I switched the video cards, I switch the Logitech mouse
    > from PS/2 to USB. I can't imagine that would make a difference... would
    it?
    >
    > Are there any setting in the P4P800-E Deluxe BIOS that might be causing
    > this? I am using the most recent BIOS v.1002.
    >
    > John
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <BI2dnXnJoNmxb3ndRVn-gw@lmi.net>, "John Blaustein"
    <nomail@nomail.com> wrote:

    > Further information....
    >
    > I now notice that I can "force" the flicker by moving the mouse over a web
    > page full of links. As the pointer passes quickly over the links, there is
    > a very subtle flicker that occurs and stops the moment the mouse stops
    > moving. Any ideas what this is about?
    >
    > John
    >
    Well, looking in the IRQ table, shows the video card has its own
    private interrupt signal. So, I cannot make a theory where a USB
    interrupt delays video servicing.

    First of all, did you uninstall the ATI video card drivers, before
    changing video cards ? Then install the Matrox drivers ?

    One thing I noticed with my G200 when I was still using it, was
    that the latest Matrox drivers, while sporting a lot more
    functionality, was also eating considerable system resources.
    The driver seemed slower than the first stable one I managed
    to find when the card was new, and screen updates were a bit
    slower than normal.

    Based on that observation, see if you can dig up a driver from
    around the time the card was introduced. Maybe it will be
    missing OpenGL or something, but it might behave better
    in the desktop.

    Generally video cards have hardware support for the cursor, and
    maybe what you are seeing, is the changing of the pixmap for the
    cursor, as it passes over the links. Normally, you would think
    this would be changed during the vertical blanking interval, so
    the change would be invisible. I wonder if the card simply doesn't
    know when it is painting the screen ? I've never heard of
    configuration options for 2D operation of a video card, but if
    that existed somewhere, it would make interesting reading.

    If you have a utility somewhere, check to see what AGP rate the
    card is running at. Maybe it is doing AGP 1X (a.k.a PCI mode) ?
    Get a copy of Powerstrip from entechtaiwan.com, and use the
    taskbar popup menu item "Options" to see what settings the video
    card is using. You could also run "dxdiag" from your DirectX
    install, to see if all video card features are enabled.

    HTH,
    Paul

    >
    >
    > "John Blaustein" <nomail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > news:OJWdnfOx5qdoS3nd4p2dnA@lmi.net...
    > > Hi,
    > >
    > > I just assembled a new system:
    > >
    > > P4P800-E Deluxe
    > > P4 3.0
    > > 2GB RAM
    > > WD 120GB SATA drive
    > > CD-RW/DVD
    > >
    > > When I first assembled the system, I put a Diamond ATI Radeon 7000 AGP
    > video
    > > card in. It worked perfectly. I have just exchanged the 7000 for a
    > Matrox
    > > G450 AGP card. For some reason, I'm now getting a slight flicker. I have
    > > installed the most current Matrox driver and am using the same resolution,
    > > color depth and refresh rate that I was using on my previous PC with the
    > > same Matrox G450 card.
    > >
    > > At the same time I switched the video cards, I switch the Logitech mouse
    > > from PS/2 to USB. I can't imagine that would make a difference... would
    > it?
    > >
    > > Are there any setting in the P4P800-E Deluxe BIOS that might be causing
    > > this? I am using the most recent BIOS v.1002.
    > >
    > > John
    > >
    > >
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Paul,

    I looked at the Matrox support forum and I see that others are having the
    same problem with the G450 and G550. The Matrox tech suggests reducing
    hardware acceleration, trying different drivers, turning off
    Hyper-Threading, etc., but I tried all those and nothing changed. I looked
    at the forum late last night and "gave up," but I'll do some more research
    there today.

    See comments inline below...

    > Well, looking in the IRQ table, shows the video card has its own
    > private interrupt signal. So, I cannot make a theory where a USB
    > interrupt delays video servicing.

    I don't think it's the mouse and USB or PS/2.

    > First of all, did you uninstall the ATI video card drivers, before
    > changing video cards ? Then install the Matrox drivers ?

    Actually, I never installed the ATI driver. I just used the XP driver that
    was installed when I did my fresh XP install. When I was removing the
    Radeon card, I removed it from Device Mgr just before turning the PC off.
    Then I installed the G450 and powered up.

    > One thing I noticed with my G200 when I was still using it, was
    > that the latest Matrox drivers, while sporting a lot more
    > functionality, was also eating considerable system resources.
    > The driver seemed slower than the first stable one I managed
    > to find when the card was new, and screen updates were a bit
    > slower than normal.

    Speed doesn't seem to be the issue.

    > Based on that observation, see if you can dig up a driver from
    > around the time the card was introduced. Maybe it will be
    > missing OpenGL or something, but it might behave better
    > in the desktop.

    I tried the XP driver and it does the same thing. On the Matrox forum,
    others tried earlier drivers without success.

    > Generally video cards have hardware support for the cursor, and
    > maybe what you are seeing, is the changing of the pixmap for the
    > cursor, as it passes over the links. Normally, you would think
    > this would be changed during the vertical blanking interval, so
    > the change would be invisible. I wonder if the card simply doesn't
    > know when it is painting the screen ? I've never heard of
    > configuration options for 2D operation of a video card, but if
    > that existed somewhere, it would make interesting reading.
    >
    > If you have a utility somewhere, check to see what AGP rate the
    > card is running at. Maybe it is doing AGP 1X (a.k.a PCI mode) ?
    > Get a copy of Powerstrip from entechtaiwan.com, and use the
    > taskbar popup menu item "Options" to see what settings the video
    > card is using. You could also run "dxdiag" from your DirectX
    > install, to see if all video card features are enabled.

    OK... I'll do that.

    Paul.... I really appreciate all the help you've given me (my thread
    "Building my own PC -- hardware advice needed" and others). You give a lot
    of your time... thanks so much.

    John
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Paul...

    One solution, perhaps the easiest, is to use the Diamond Stealth S60 (ATI
    Radeon 7000) card on my new machine. It worked fine, even with the XP
    driver. I do no gaming, so 3D isn't an issue. My use of the PC is
    Photoshop, MS Office, Quicken, etc. I had the Matrox G450 for dual monitor
    support, but now I don't use that feature. I am using dual monitors, but I
    had to install a second PCI card for the second monitor because I use
    hardware/software to calibrate and profile the monitor for accurate color
    management, and that software won't work unless both monitors have their own
    video card. (I have not installed the second card into the new machine yet,
    but it worked fine in my old machine.)

    I'm not sure the Radeon 7000 is as good a card as the G450, but it may be
    fine for my purposes. The G450 worked fine in my old machine -- ASUS
    CUV4X-E, P3 1Ghz. I'm no expert on this stuff, but I have to say I was
    startled when I realized I had this problem with my new MoBo since the G450
    worked so well with the old one.

    John
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Paul,

    All DirectX tests completed without problems and all features on video card
    are enabled. Further reading on the Matrox forum suggests this is a Matrox
    problem with some ASUS (and other?) motherboards.

    John


    DXDIAG shows the following:

    ------------------
    System Information
    ------------------
    Time of this report: 7/2/2004, 08:52:02
    Machine name: JOHN-P4
    Operating System: Windows XP Home Edition (5.1, Build 2600) Service Pack
    1 (2600.xpsp2.030422-1633)
    Language: English (Regional Setting: English)
    System Manufacturer: To Be Filled By O.E.M.
    System Model: To Be Filled By O.E.M.
    BIOS: BIOS Date: 02/25/04 11:27:43 Ver: 08.00.09
    Processor: Intel(R) Pentium(R) 4 CPU 3.00GHz (2 CPUs)
    Memory: 2048MB RAM
    Page File: 151MB used, 3792MB available
    Windows Dir: C:\WINDOWS
    DirectX Version: DirectX 9.0b (4.09.0000.0902)
    DX Setup Parameters: Not found
    DxDiag Version: 5.03.0001.0902 32bit Unicode

    ------------
    DxDiag Notes
    ------------
    DirectX Files Tab: No problems found.
    Display Tab 1: No problems found. DirectDraw test results: All tests
    were successful. Direct3D 7 test results: The tests were cancelled before
    completing. Direct3D 8 test results: The tests were cancelled before
    completing. Direct3D 9 test results: The tests were cancelled before
    completing.
    Sound Tab 1: No problems found.
    Music Tab: No problems found.
    Input Tab: No problems found.
    Network Tab: No problems found. DirectPlay test results: The tests
    were cancelled before completing.

    --------------------
    DirectX Debug Levels
    --------------------
    Direct3D: 0/4 (n/a)
    DirectDraw: 0/4 (retail)
    DirectInput: 0/5 (n/a)
    DirectMusic: 0/5 (n/a)
    DirectPlay: 0/9 (retail)
    DirectSound: 0/5 (retail)
    DirectShow: 0/6 (retail)

    ---------------
    Display Devices
    ---------------
    Card name: Matrox Millennium G450 DualHead - English
    Manufacturer: Matrox Graphics Inc.
    Chip type: Matrox G450
    DAC type: Integrated, 360 MHz
    Device Key: Enum\PCI\VEN_102B&DEV_0525&SUBSYS_0641102B&REV_82
    Display Memory: 32.0 MB
    Current Mode: 1152 x 864 (32 bit) (85Hz)
    Monitor: Plug and Play Monitor
    Monitor Max Res: 1600,1200
    Driver Name: G400DHD.dll
    Driver Version: 6.12.0001.1920 (English)
    DDI Version: 7
    Driver Attributes: Final Retail
    Driver Date/Size: 1/26/2004 13:47:06, 2390144 bytes
    WHQL Logo'd: Yes
    WHQL Date Stamp: n/a
    VDD: n/a
    Mini VDD: g400dhm.sys
    Mini VDD Date: 1/26/2004 13:48:12, 343552 bytes
    Device Identifier: {D7B71ECB-4665-11CF-1B74-402621C2CB35}
    Vendor ID: 0x102B
    Device ID: 0x0525
    SubSys ID: 0x0641102B
    Revision ID: 0x0082
    Revision ID: 0x0082
    Video Accel:
    Deinterlace Caps: n/a
    Registry: OK
    DDraw Status: Enabled
    D3D Status: Enabled
    AGP Status: Enabled
    DDraw Test Result: All tests were successful.
    D3D7 Test Result: The tests were cancelled before completing.
    D3D8 Test Result: The tests were cancelled before completing.
    D3D9 Test Result: The tests were cancelled before completing.
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <w9Cdne3rKctyFnjdRVn-sA@lmi.net>, "John Blaustein"
    <nomail@nomail.com> wrote:

    > Paul,
    >
    > All DirectX tests completed without problems and all features on video card
    > are enabled. Further reading on the Matrox forum suggests this is a Matrox
    > problem with some ASUS (and other?) motherboards.
    >
    > John
    >
    >
    >
    > DXDIAG shows the following:
    <<snip>>

    To find some old drivers, I tried the following:

    web.archive.org contains snapshots of popular web sites.
    http://web.archive.org/web/*/http://www.matrox.com

    Step back a bit, like here:

    http://web.archive.org/web/20020805121329/www.matrox.com

    Then, using the URL for the driver download today, glue that onto the
    end of the URL, and end up here. There is a link on this page, for the
    5.72 version of the driver for the G450.

    http://web.archive.org/web/20020805121329/www.matrox.com/mga/support/drivers/certified/home.cfm

    Uninstall your current driver and give this a try.

    http://www.matrox.com/mga/support/drivers/files/w2k_572.cfm

    HTH,
    Paul
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Thanks, Paul.

    OK, I've now tried all of the following:

    Windows XP Home driver
    2kxp_592_006
    w2k_582
    w2k_572

    All drivers produce the flickering!

    While I hesitate to do so, I think I will put the Diamond Stealth S60 ATI
    Radeon 7000 card back into the new system and use the Matrox card in the old
    system. For 2D works -- Photoshop in particular -- the Radeon 7000 may be
    just fine. Do you know anything about the Radeon 7000? Do you think it's
    adequate for my needs?

    If the 7000 isn't adequate, I may need to buy another card. Any suggestions
    on a good card that you know works well with the P4P800-E Deluxe? As I
    mentioned, I don't need games and heavy-duty 3D video, just excellent
    quality 2D.

    John


    "Paul" <nospam@needed.com> wrote in message
    news:nospam-0207041318400001@192.168.1.177...
    > In article <w9Cdne3rKctyFnjdRVn-sA@lmi.net>, "John Blaustein"
    > <nomail@nomail.com> wrote:
    >
    > > Paul,
    > >
    > > All DirectX tests completed without problems and all features on video
    card
    > > are enabled. Further reading on the Matrox forum suggests this is a
    Matrox
    > > problem with some ASUS (and other?) motherboards.
    > >
    > > John
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > DXDIAG shows the following:
    > <<snip>>
    >
    > To find some old drivers, I tried the following:
    >
    > web.archive.org contains snapshots of popular web sites.
    > http://web.archive.org/web/*/http://www.matrox.com
    >
    > Step back a bit, like here:
    >
    > http://web.archive.org/web/20020805121329/www.matrox.com
    >
    > Then, using the URL for the driver download today, glue that onto the
    > end of the URL, and end up here. There is a link on this page, for the
    > 5.72 version of the driver for the G450.
    >
    >
    http://web.archive.org/web/20020805121329/www.matrox.com/mga/support/drivers/certified/home.cfm
    >
    > Uninstall your current driver and give this a try.
    >
    > http://www.matrox.com/mga/support/drivers/files/w2k_572.cfm
    >
    > HTH,
    > Paul
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <jtCdnSdJ9_DVNXjdRVn-hQ@lmi.net>, "John Blaustein"
    <nomail@nomail.com> wrote:

    > Thanks, Paul.
    >
    > OK, I've now tried all of the following:
    >
    > Windows XP Home driver
    > 2kxp_592_006
    > w2k_582
    > w2k_572
    >
    > All drivers produce the flickering!
    >
    > While I hesitate to do so, I think I will put the Diamond Stealth S60 ATI
    > Radeon 7000 card back into the new system and use the Matrox card in the old
    > system. For 2D works -- Photoshop in particular -- the Radeon 7000 may be
    > just fine. Do you know anything about the Radeon 7000? Do you think it's
    > adequate for my needs?
    >
    > If the 7000 isn't adequate, I may need to buy another card. Any suggestions
    > on a good card that you know works well with the P4P800-E Deluxe? As I
    > mentioned, I don't need games and heavy-duty 3D video, just excellent
    > quality 2D.
    >
    > John

    Video cards have a 2D and a 3D portion to them. We spend the big bucks
    to get enhanced 3D performance, but the 2D part of the cards, for the
    most part, hasn't changed in years. In that sense, any modern card with
    a working AGP interface is going to work for you. (A PCI video card
    might be perceived as too slow at screen updates, when handling large
    bitmaps.) As I'm not a dedicated Photoshop user, it would be unfair
    for me to suggest a card, as there can be tiny differences between
    them that annoy professional users.

    If you have a color calibration system and a good CRT monitor, then
    you can probably calibrate out any color issues. (Calibrator, as in one
    of those devices that you hold up to the CRT, to calibrate the color
    response.)

    Other than that, video cards have some differences between them, as
    to how sharp they are at high resolution. You could try Google on
    the name or model number of what you plan on using, combined with the
    word "fuzzy", to see if the card you are interested in is a dud
    or not. Some cards in fact don't have bad video chips - they have
    too much filtering of the output just before it goes to the VGA
    connector. Some of those cards can be fixed by removing the filter
    caps from the PI filters near the connector. The filters are
    distinguishable by the fact there are three color channels, so you
    see three groups of identical components near the VGA connector
    on the video card. People used to care about this in years past,
    and there used to be recipes for removing the caps by snipping
    them (yuck!). It is a wonder the video cards weren't damaged by
    that.

    Too bad the flicker cannot be stopped on your Matrox. Have you
    tried disabling all hardware acceleration ? There is a slider to
    do that, and maybe with all acceleration disabled, it will stop
    flickering.

    HTH,
    Paul

    <<snip>>
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Paul,

    See below...

    > Video cards have a 2D and a 3D portion to them. We spend the big bucks
    > to get enhanced 3D performance, but the 2D part of the cards, for the
    > most part, hasn't changed in years. In that sense, any modern card with
    > a working AGP interface is going to work for you. (A PCI video card
    > might be perceived as too slow at screen updates, when handling large
    > bitmaps.) As I'm not a dedicated Photoshop user, it would be unfair
    > for me to suggest a card, as there can be tiny differences between
    > them that annoy professional users.

    Yes, I understand that about 3D vs. 2D, which is why I don't see the need
    for an expensive card.

    I've switched cards -- the Radeon 7000 is back in the new system. No
    flicker, needle sharp text and images, immediate redraw, passes all DXDIAG
    tests. I'm going to stick with it for a while and see how it goes.

    > If you have a color calibration system and a good CRT monitor, then
    > you can probably calibrate out any color issues. (Calibrator, as in one
    > of those devices that you hold up to the CRT, to calibrate the color
    > response.)

    Yes, I use a color calibration system -- ColorVision's OptiCAL with Spyder
    (the device you stick on the monitor to read the color). I use a good Sony
    21" monitor. I haven't loaded OptiCAL on the new system yet, but will in
    the next few days. I also will install a second video card -- inexpensive
    PCI card to run a second monitor for Photoshop use -- you put the image on
    the main monitor all the palettes (controls) on the second monitor. It's a
    great way to work. (I'm a photographer, so I spend a lot of time using PS.)

    I'm assuming OptiCAL will "do its thing" with the Radeon card, but until I
    install OptiCAL and run the calibration and profiling software, I won't be
    sure the Radeon is the best solution. There is no reason it shouldn't work,
    but you know how that goes.

    > Other than that, video cards have some differences between them, as
    > to how sharp they are at high resolution. You could try Google on
    > the name or model number of what you plan on using, combined with the
    > word "fuzzy", to see if the card you are interested in is a dud
    > or not. Some cards in fact don't have bad video chips - they have
    > too much filtering of the output just before it goes to the VGA
    > connector. Some of those cards can be fixed by removing the filter
    > caps from the PI filters near the connector. The filters are
    > distinguishable by the fact there are three color channels, so you
    > see three groups of identical components near the VGA connector
    > on the video card. People used to care about this in years past,
    > and there used to be recipes for removing the caps by snipping
    > them (yuck!). It is a wonder the video cards weren't damaged by
    > that.

    I'm not inclined to start snipping things off of video cards, but I'll have
    a look!

    > Too bad the flicker cannot be stopped on your Matrox. Have you
    > tried disabling all hardware acceleration ? There is a slider to
    > do that, and maybe with all acceleration disabled, it will stop
    > flickering.

    Yes, I tried disabling hardware acceleration, disabling hyper-threading,
    trying different resolutions and refresh rates, but nothing made the flicker
    go away. One interesting thing is a fellow-photographer I met on the
    Photoshop newsgroup has the same mobo as I do and he uses a Matrox G550
    (mine is the G450, but virtually identical), and he doesn't have the
    flicker. Go figure. He e-mailed me that he has a G450 he's not using and
    offered to send it to me just to test. Even though the Radeon is working
    now, I may have him send the card. I sure would like to find out that my
    G450 is defective, rather than conclude that there is something wrong with
    my mobo. It's all perplexing since the G450 should work just fine with the
    P4P. Oh well.

    In the installation guide for the Radeon card, it says that prior to
    installing the card, the AGP aperture size should be set to 1/4 the size of
    the memory on the card. I found the AGP aperture setting in BIOS and it's
    at 64. I left it there and the Radeon is working fine. I'm curious what
    that setting does. Do you know? The Radeon has 32MB on it, so that would
    suggest I set the AGP aperture to 8MB. What do you think?

    John
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <wKydnffsnpPD13vdRVn-vg@lmi.net>, "John Blaustein"
    <nomail@nomail.com> wrote:

    > Paul,
    >
    > See below...
    >
    > > Video cards have a 2D and a 3D portion to them. We spend the big bucks
    > > to get enhanced 3D performance, but the 2D part of the cards, for the
    > > most part, hasn't changed in years. In that sense, any modern card with
    > > a working AGP interface is going to work for you. (A PCI video card
    > > might be perceived as too slow at screen updates, when handling large
    > > bitmaps.) As I'm not a dedicated Photoshop user, it would be unfair
    > > for me to suggest a card, as there can be tiny differences between
    > > them that annoy professional users.
    >
    > Yes, I understand that about 3D vs. 2D, which is why I don't see the need
    > for an expensive card.
    >
    > I've switched cards -- the Radeon 7000 is back in the new system. No
    > flicker, needle sharp text and images, immediate redraw, passes all DXDIAG
    > tests. I'm going to stick with it for a while and see how it goes.
    >
    > > If you have a color calibration system and a good CRT monitor, then
    > > you can probably calibrate out any color issues. (Calibrator, as in one
    > > of those devices that you hold up to the CRT, to calibrate the color
    > > response.)
    >
    > Yes, I use a color calibration system -- ColorVision's OptiCAL with Spyder
    > (the device you stick on the monitor to read the color). I use a good Sony
    > 21" monitor. I haven't loaded OptiCAL on the new system yet, but will in
    > the next few days. I also will install a second video card -- inexpensive
    > PCI card to run a second monitor for Photoshop use -- you put the image on
    > the main monitor all the palettes (controls) on the second monitor. It's a
    > great way to work. (I'm a photographer, so I spend a lot of time using PS.)
    >
    > I'm assuming OptiCAL will "do its thing" with the Radeon card, but until I
    > install OptiCAL and run the calibration and profiling software, I won't be
    > sure the Radeon is the best solution. There is no reason it shouldn't work,
    > but you know how that goes.
    >
    > > Other than that, video cards have some differences between them, as
    > > to how sharp they are at high resolution. You could try Google on
    > > the name or model number of what you plan on using, combined with the
    > > word "fuzzy", to see if the card you are interested in is a dud
    > > or not. Some cards in fact don't have bad video chips - they have
    > > too much filtering of the output just before it goes to the VGA
    > > connector. Some of those cards can be fixed by removing the filter
    > > caps from the PI filters near the connector. The filters are
    > > distinguishable by the fact there are three color channels, so you
    > > see three groups of identical components near the VGA connector
    > > on the video card. People used to care about this in years past,
    > > and there used to be recipes for removing the caps by snipping
    > > them (yuck!). It is a wonder the video cards weren't damaged by
    > > that.
    >
    > I'm not inclined to start snipping things off of video cards, but I'll have
    > a look!
    >
    > > Too bad the flicker cannot be stopped on your Matrox. Have you
    > > tried disabling all hardware acceleration ? There is a slider to
    > > do that, and maybe with all acceleration disabled, it will stop
    > > flickering.
    >
    > Yes, I tried disabling hardware acceleration, disabling hyper-threading,
    > trying different resolutions and refresh rates, but nothing made the flicker
    > go away. One interesting thing is a fellow-photographer I met on the
    > Photoshop newsgroup has the same mobo as I do and he uses a Matrox G550
    > (mine is the G450, but virtually identical), and he doesn't have the
    > flicker. Go figure. He e-mailed me that he has a G450 he's not using and
    > offered to send it to me just to test. Even though the Radeon is working
    > now, I may have him send the card. I sure would like to find out that my
    > G450 is defective, rather than conclude that there is something wrong with
    > my mobo. It's all perplexing since the G450 should work just fine with the
    > P4P. Oh well.
    >
    > In the installation guide for the Radeon card, it says that prior to
    > installing the card, the AGP aperture size should be set to 1/4 the size of
    > the memory on the card. I found the AGP aperture setting in BIOS and it's
    > at 64. I left it there and the Radeon is working fine. I'm curious what
    > that setting does. Do you know? The Radeon has 32MB on it, so that would
    > suggest I set the AGP aperture to 8MB. What do you think?
    >
    > John

    Sounds like everything is working out for you.

    The AGP aperture is for mapping system memory as an extension of
    the texture memory for 3D stuff. I wouldn't worry about the setting
    unless you plan on gaming. (As far as resource usage, AGP aperture
    reserves part of the address space of the processor, so in a large
    memory situation, could be an issue. What I don't know, is whether
    the memory it maps to, is allocated on the fly, or is statically
    allocated (rojakpot says GART memory is on the fly). And, the rule
    might have been "1/4 of system memory", which could be a ridiculously
    large number. Some systems freeze up when you mess around with the
    AGP aperture, so leaving it alone is also an option.)

    http://www.sysopt.com/agp.html

    There is BIOS settings advice here:

    http://www.rojakpot.com/freeBOG.aspx
    http://www.rojakpot.com/showFreeBOG.aspx?Lang=0&bogno=32 ("Aperture")

    While working in 2D, most of the memory on your video card will
    be unused. The memory that is used, will be for frame buffering.

    HTH,
    Paul
  11. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Paul,

    I'm leaving the AGP aperture setting alone. The Radeon seems to be working
    just fine.

    I'll check out the pages you linked. Thanks. I'm enjoying learning all
    sorts of new things as I researched my new system, built it, and am now
    using it.

    John


    "Paul" <nospam@needed.com> wrote in message
    news:nospam-0307040444390001@192.168.1.177...
    > In article <wKydnffsnpPD13vdRVn-vg@lmi.net>, "John Blaustein"
    > <nomail@nomail.com> wrote:
    >
    > > Paul,
    > >
    > > See below...
    > >
    > > > Video cards have a 2D and a 3D portion to them. We spend the big bucks
    > > > to get enhanced 3D performance, but the 2D part of the cards, for the
    > > > most part, hasn't changed in years. In that sense, any modern card
    with
    > > > a working AGP interface is going to work for you. (A PCI video card
    > > > might be perceived as too slow at screen updates, when handling large
    > > > bitmaps.) As I'm not a dedicated Photoshop user, it would be unfair
    > > > for me to suggest a card, as there can be tiny differences between
    > > > them that annoy professional users.
    > >
    > > Yes, I understand that about 3D vs. 2D, which is why I don't see the
    need
    > > for an expensive card.
    > >
    > > I've switched cards -- the Radeon 7000 is back in the new system. No
    > > flicker, needle sharp text and images, immediate redraw, passes all
    DXDIAG
    > > tests. I'm going to stick with it for a while and see how it goes.
    > >
    > > > If you have a color calibration system and a good CRT monitor, then
    > > > you can probably calibrate out any color issues. (Calibrator, as in
    one
    > > > of those devices that you hold up to the CRT, to calibrate the color
    > > > response.)
    > >
    > > Yes, I use a color calibration system -- ColorVision's OptiCAL with
    Spyder
    > > (the device you stick on the monitor to read the color). I use a good
    Sony
    > > 21" monitor. I haven't loaded OptiCAL on the new system yet, but will
    in
    > > the next few days. I also will install a second video card --
    inexpensive
    > > PCI card to run a second monitor for Photoshop use -- you put the image
    on
    > > the main monitor all the palettes (controls) on the second monitor.
    It's a
    > > great way to work. (I'm a photographer, so I spend a lot of time using
    PS.)
    > >
    > > I'm assuming OptiCAL will "do its thing" with the Radeon card, but until
    I
    > > install OptiCAL and run the calibration and profiling software, I won't
    be
    > > sure the Radeon is the best solution. There is no reason it shouldn't
    work,
    > > but you know how that goes.
    > >
    > > > Other than that, video cards have some differences between them, as
    > > > to how sharp they are at high resolution. You could try Google on
    > > > the name or model number of what you plan on using, combined with the
    > > > word "fuzzy", to see if the card you are interested in is a dud
    > > > or not. Some cards in fact don't have bad video chips - they have
    > > > too much filtering of the output just before it goes to the VGA
    > > > connector. Some of those cards can be fixed by removing the filter
    > > > caps from the PI filters near the connector. The filters are
    > > > distinguishable by the fact there are three color channels, so you
    > > > see three groups of identical components near the VGA connector
    > > > on the video card. People used to care about this in years past,
    > > > and there used to be recipes for removing the caps by snipping
    > > > them (yuck!). It is a wonder the video cards weren't damaged by
    > > > that.
    > >
    > > I'm not inclined to start snipping things off of video cards, but I'll
    have
    > > a look!
    > >
    > > > Too bad the flicker cannot be stopped on your Matrox. Have you
    > > > tried disabling all hardware acceleration ? There is a slider to
    > > > do that, and maybe with all acceleration disabled, it will stop
    > > > flickering.
    > >
    > > Yes, I tried disabling hardware acceleration, disabling hyper-threading,
    > > trying different resolutions and refresh rates, but nothing made the
    flicker
    > > go away. One interesting thing is a fellow-photographer I met on the
    > > Photoshop newsgroup has the same mobo as I do and he uses a Matrox G550
    > > (mine is the G450, but virtually identical), and he doesn't have the
    > > flicker. Go figure. He e-mailed me that he has a G450 he's not using
    and
    > > offered to send it to me just to test. Even though the Radeon is
    working
    > > now, I may have him send the card. I sure would like to find out that
    my
    > > G450 is defective, rather than conclude that there is something wrong
    with
    > > my mobo. It's all perplexing since the G450 should work just fine with
    the
    > > P4P. Oh well.
    > >
    > > In the installation guide for the Radeon card, it says that prior to
    > > installing the card, the AGP aperture size should be set to 1/4 the size
    of
    > > the memory on the card. I found the AGP aperture setting in BIOS and
    it's
    > > at 64. I left it there and the Radeon is working fine. I'm curious
    what
    > > that setting does. Do you know? The Radeon has 32MB on it, so that
    would
    > > suggest I set the AGP aperture to 8MB. What do you think?
    > >
    > > John
    >
    > Sounds like everything is working out for you.
    >
    > The AGP aperture is for mapping system memory as an extension of
    > the texture memory for 3D stuff. I wouldn't worry about the setting
    > unless you plan on gaming. (As far as resource usage, AGP aperture
    > reserves part of the address space of the processor, so in a large
    > memory situation, could be an issue. What I don't know, is whether
    > the memory it maps to, is allocated on the fly, or is statically
    > allocated (rojakpot says GART memory is on the fly). And, the rule
    > might have been "1/4 of system memory", which could be a ridiculously
    > large number. Some systems freeze up when you mess around with the
    > AGP aperture, so leaving it alone is also an option.)
    >
    > http://www.sysopt.com/agp.html
    >
    > There is BIOS settings advice here:
    >
    > http://www.rojakpot.com/freeBOG.aspx
    > http://www.rojakpot.com/showFreeBOG.aspx?Lang=0&bogno=32 ("Aperture")
    >
    > While working in 2D, most of the memory on your video card will
    > be unused. The memory that is used, will be for frame buffering.
    >
    > HTH,
    > Paul
  12. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Paul,

    Follow up...

    I just installed my second video card (PCI) to drive a second monitor. No
    problem. Then, I installed ColorVision OptiCAL and calibrated and profiled
    both monitors. Perfect! I'll stick with the Radeon 7000 and use the Matrox
    card in my old PC (where it's been working fine).

    All is well! Thanks again for all your help. (That site about BIOS
    tweaking is amazing.)

    John
  13. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Can't speak for MATROX cards, but I used a Nvidia card for a long time;
    TnT2Ultra, which is suppositely better than the later GeForce3 + cards;
    And even some ti 4XXX versions. The RAMDAC on the ATI cards are
    superior IMHO. Even a small toshiba laptop with an old RAGE ATI chipset
    felt crisper, yet more alive.

    I guess that's one purpose of the OptiCAL program. To establish natural tone
    and equally bright image. Current Radeon 9800 is fulfilling every dreams
    I had about lifeliness. OptiCAL must be pretty accurate, or both your monitors
    identical to give you confidence in a separate palette.

    So, John, I gues sit's back to work for you.
    Good thing Paul was here :)
    Now it's summer and we need more upskirt shots; John.
    Don't work too hard; Been there, done that... ;)

    >John Blaustein wrote in message ...
    >Paul,
    >
    >Follow up...
    >
    >I just installed my second video card (PCI) to drive a second monitor. No
    >problem. Then, I installed ColorVision OptiCAL and calibrated and profiled
    >both monitors. Perfect! I'll stick with the Radeon 7000 and use the Matrox
    >card in my old PC (where it's been working fine).
    >
    >All is well! Thanks again for all your help. (That site about BIOS
    >tweaking is amazing.)
    >
    >John
  14. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Here's a follow-up to my original post:

    A friend loaned me his Matrox G450 card -- identical to my card. It works
    perfectly in my P4P800-E Deluxe board. No flicker. Both cards -- mine and
    my friend's -- work fine in the CUV4X-E, but mine flickers in the P4P board.

    At the suggestion of a Matrox tech guy on their forum, I updated the BIOS on
    my card, but that didn't help. I've tried my card with at least three
    versions of the Matrox driver. Still, no luck.

    Basically, my card works in the CUV mobo, but flickers in the P4P mobo.
    This doesn't make sense to me -- why would my card work in one mobo, but not
    in another, when an identical card works fine in both mobos?

    Any ideas?

    John


    "John Blaustein" <nomail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    news:OJWdnfOx5qdoS3nd4p2dnA@lmi.net...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I just assembled a new system:
    >
    > P4P800-E Deluxe
    > P4 3.0
    > 2GB RAM
    > WD 120GB SATA drive
    > CD-RW/DVD
    >
    > When I first assembled the system, I put a Diamond ATI Radeon 7000 AGP
    video
    > card in. It worked perfectly. I have just exchanged the 7000 for a
    Matrox
    > G450 AGP card. For some reason, I'm now getting a slight flicker. I have
    > installed the most current Matrox driver and am using the same resolution,
    > color depth and refresh rate that I was using on my previous PC with the
    > same Matrox G450 card.
    >
    > At the same time I switched the video cards, I switch the Logitech mouse
    > from PS/2 to USB. I can't imagine that would make a difference... would
    it?
    >
    > Are there any setting in the P4P800-E Deluxe BIOS that might be causing
    > this? I am using the most recent BIOS v.1002.
    >
    > John
    >
    >
  15. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    No ideas, except why not just trade G450's with your friend (maybe buy him a
    new game as a thank-you?)

    "John Blaustein" <nomail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    news:Vr6dnTlrer-CvW3dRVn-jA@lmi.net...
    > Here's a follow-up to my original post:
    >
    > A friend loaned me his Matrox G450 card -- identical to my card. It works
    > perfectly in my P4P800-E Deluxe board. No flicker. Both cards -- mine
    and
    > my friend's -- work fine in the CUV4X-E, but mine flickers in the P4P
    board.
    >
    > At the suggestion of a Matrox tech guy on their forum, I updated the BIOS
    on
    > my card, but that didn't help. I've tried my card with at least three
    > versions of the Matrox driver. Still, no luck.
    >
    > Basically, my card works in the CUV mobo, but flickers in the P4P mobo.
    > This doesn't make sense to me -- why would my card work in one mobo, but
    not
    > in another, when an identical card works fine in both mobos?
    >
    > Any ideas?
    >
    > John
    >
    >
    >
    > "John Blaustein" <nomail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > news:OJWdnfOx5qdoS3nd4p2dnA@lmi.net...
    > > Hi,
    > >
    > > I just assembled a new system:
    > >
    > > P4P800-E Deluxe
    > > P4 3.0
    > > 2GB RAM
    > > WD 120GB SATA drive
    > > CD-RW/DVD
    > >
    > > When I first assembled the system, I put a Diamond ATI Radeon 7000 AGP
    > video
    > > card in. It worked perfectly. I have just exchanged the 7000 for a
    > Matrox
    > > G450 AGP card. For some reason, I'm now getting a slight flicker. I
    have
    > > installed the most current Matrox driver and am using the same
    resolution,
    > > color depth and refresh rate that I was using on my previous PC with the
    > > same Matrox G450 card.
    > >
    > > At the same time I switched the video cards, I switch the Logitech mouse
    > > from PS/2 to USB. I can't imagine that would make a difference... would
    > it?
    > >
    > > Are there any setting in the P4P800-E Deluxe BIOS that might be causing
    > > this? I am using the most recent BIOS v.1002.
    > >
    > > John
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  16. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    DanO,

    I may end up using my friend's G450, so your suggestion is a good one.
    However, that doesn't answer why this is happening, and I'm always curious
    to know why things don't work.

    John

    "DanO" <danogorchockNO@SPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:zRgIc.111643$wH4.6340363@twister.southeast.rr.com...
    > No ideas, except why not just trade G450's with your friend (maybe buy him
    a
    > new game as a thank-you?)
    >
    > "John Blaustein" <nomail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > news:Vr6dnTlrer-CvW3dRVn-jA@lmi.net...
    > > Here's a follow-up to my original post:
    > >
    > > A friend loaned me his Matrox G450 card -- identical to my card. It
    works
    > > perfectly in my P4P800-E Deluxe board. No flicker. Both cards -- mine
    > and
    > > my friend's -- work fine in the CUV4X-E, but mine flickers in the P4P
    > board.
    > >
    > > At the suggestion of a Matrox tech guy on their forum, I updated the
    BIOS
    > on
    > > my card, but that didn't help. I've tried my card with at least three
    > > versions of the Matrox driver. Still, no luck.
    > >
    > > Basically, my card works in the CUV mobo, but flickers in the P4P mobo.
    > > This doesn't make sense to me -- why would my card work in one mobo, but
    > not
    > > in another, when an identical card works fine in both mobos?
    > >
    > > Any ideas?
    > >
    > > John
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > "John Blaustein" <nomail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > > news:OJWdnfOx5qdoS3nd4p2dnA@lmi.net...
    > > > Hi,
    > > >
    > > > I just assembled a new system:
    > > >
    > > > P4P800-E Deluxe
    > > > P4 3.0
    > > > 2GB RAM
    > > > WD 120GB SATA drive
    > > > CD-RW/DVD
    > > >
    > > > When I first assembled the system, I put a Diamond ATI Radeon 7000 AGP
    > > video
    > > > card in. It worked perfectly. I have just exchanged the 7000 for a
    > > Matrox
    > > > G450 AGP card. For some reason, I'm now getting a slight flicker. I
    > have
    > > > installed the most current Matrox driver and am using the same
    > resolution,
    > > > color depth and refresh rate that I was using on my previous PC with
    the
    > > > same Matrox G450 card.
    > > >
    > > > At the same time I switched the video cards, I switch the Logitech
    mouse
    > > > from PS/2 to USB. I can't imagine that would make a difference...
    would
    > > it?
    > > >
    > > > Are there any setting in the P4P800-E Deluxe BIOS that might be
    causing
    > > > this? I am using the most recent BIOS v.1002.
    > > >
    > > > John
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  17. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    John,
    I understand completely. My curiosity rarely allows me to leave
    questions like this unanswered (I am an Electrical Engineer, so my curiosity
    itch is constantly being scratched.)

    One idea, have you tried swapping the power supply with a different one?
    Maybe one card is drawing less power than the other, and your power supply
    is having trouble keeping up with your card. Just a guess.

    DanO

    "John Blaustein" <nomail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    news:OKGdnaZFtZOwOWzdRVn-iQ@lmi.net...
    > DanO,
    >
    > I may end up using my friend's G450, so your suggestion is a good one.
    > However, that doesn't answer why this is happening, and I'm always curious
    > to know why things don't work.
    >
    > John
    >
    > "DanO" <danogorchockNO@SPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message
    > news:zRgIc.111643$wH4.6340363@twister.southeast.rr.com...
    > > No ideas, except why not just trade G450's with your friend (maybe buy
    him
    > a
    > > new game as a thank-you?)
    > >
    > > "John Blaustein" <nomail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > > news:Vr6dnTlrer-CvW3dRVn-jA@lmi.net...
    > > > Here's a follow-up to my original post:
    > > >
    > > > A friend loaned me his Matrox G450 card -- identical to my card. It
    > works
    > > > perfectly in my P4P800-E Deluxe board. No flicker. Both cards --
    mine
    > > and
    > > > my friend's -- work fine in the CUV4X-E, but mine flickers in the P4P
    > > board.
    > > >
    > > > At the suggestion of a Matrox tech guy on their forum, I updated the
    > BIOS
    > > on
    > > > my card, but that didn't help. I've tried my card with at least three
    > > > versions of the Matrox driver. Still, no luck.
    > > >
    > > > Basically, my card works in the CUV mobo, but flickers in the P4P
    mobo.
    > > > This doesn't make sense to me -- why would my card work in one mobo,
    but
    > > not
    > > > in another, when an identical card works fine in both mobos?
    > > >
    > > > Any ideas?
    > > >
    > > > John
    > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > "John Blaustein" <nomail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > > > news:OJWdnfOx5qdoS3nd4p2dnA@lmi.net...
    > > > > Hi,
    > > > >
    > > > > I just assembled a new system:
    > > > >
    > > > > P4P800-E Deluxe
    > > > > P4 3.0
    > > > > 2GB RAM
    > > > > WD 120GB SATA drive
    > > > > CD-RW/DVD
    > > > >
    > > > > When I first assembled the system, I put a Diamond ATI Radeon 7000
    AGP
    > > > video
    > > > > card in. It worked perfectly. I have just exchanged the 7000 for a
    > > > Matrox
    > > > > G450 AGP card. For some reason, I'm now getting a slight flicker.
    I
    > > have
    > > > > installed the most current Matrox driver and am using the same
    > > resolution,
    > > > > color depth and refresh rate that I was using on my previous PC with
    > the
    > > > > same Matrox G450 card.
    > > > >
    > > > > At the same time I switched the video cards, I switch the Logitech
    > mouse
    > > > > from PS/2 to USB. I can't imagine that would make a difference...
    > would
    > > > it?
    > > > >
    > > > > Are there any setting in the P4P800-E Deluxe BIOS that might be
    > causing
    > > > > this? I am using the most recent BIOS v.1002.
    > > > >
    > > > > John
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  18. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Hi DanO,

    I'm a photographer, not a computer person, but cameras are getting to be
    like computers, so I am always driven to completely understand how things
    work, and to be sure they are working correctly.

    Actually, I did try switching power supplies, and it made no difference.

    The Matrox tech guy didn't have an explanation and finally suggested I
    return the card to them, but when I requested an RMA, they e-mailed that the
    card is no longer under warranty -- fair enough, it's over three years
    old -- and a repair or replacement would cost $50 plus shipping (both ways).
    I can pick up a used one on eBay for half that, so I declined. In
    addition, my friend is letting me keep his card, so I'm in good shape now --
    I'm leaving the "broken" card in the CUV machine and using my friend's card
    in the P4P machine, so both machines now have perfect video. And, for a
    small fee, newegg.com will allow me to return the Radeon card. All is well.

    John


    "DanO" <danogorchockNO@SPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:Vs%Ic.158102$tH1.5629590@twister.southeast.rr.com...
    > John,
    > I understand completely. My curiosity rarely allows me to leave
    > questions like this unanswered (I am an Electrical Engineer, so my
    curiosity
    > itch is constantly being scratched.)
    >
    > One idea, have you tried swapping the power supply with a different one?
    > Maybe one card is drawing less power than the other, and your power supply
    > is having trouble keeping up with your card. Just a guess.
    >
    > DanO
    >
    > "John Blaustein" <nomail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > news:OKGdnaZFtZOwOWzdRVn-iQ@lmi.net...
    > > DanO,
    > >
    > > I may end up using my friend's G450, so your suggestion is a good one.
    > > However, that doesn't answer why this is happening, and I'm always
    curious
    > > to know why things don't work.
    > >
    > > John
    > >
    > > "DanO" <danogorchockNO@SPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message
    > > news:zRgIc.111643$wH4.6340363@twister.southeast.rr.com...
    > > > No ideas, except why not just trade G450's with your friend (maybe buy
    > him
    > > a
    > > > new game as a thank-you?)
    > > >
    > > > "John Blaustein" <nomail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > > > news:Vr6dnTlrer-CvW3dRVn-jA@lmi.net...
    > > > > Here's a follow-up to my original post:
    > > > >
    > > > > A friend loaned me his Matrox G450 card -- identical to my card. It
    > > works
    > > > > perfectly in my P4P800-E Deluxe board. No flicker. Both cards --
    > mine
    > > > and
    > > > > my friend's -- work fine in the CUV4X-E, but mine flickers in the
    P4P
    > > > board.
    > > > >
    > > > > At the suggestion of a Matrox tech guy on their forum, I updated the
    > > BIOS
    > > > on
    > > > > my card, but that didn't help. I've tried my card with at least
    three
    > > > > versions of the Matrox driver. Still, no luck.
    > > > >
    > > > > Basically, my card works in the CUV mobo, but flickers in the P4P
    > mobo.
    > > > > This doesn't make sense to me -- why would my card work in one mobo,
    > but
    > > > not
    > > > > in another, when an identical card works fine in both mobos?
    > > > >
    > > > > Any ideas?
    > > > >
    > > > > John
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > > "John Blaustein" <nomail@nomail.com> wrote in message
    > > > > news:OJWdnfOx5qdoS3nd4p2dnA@lmi.net...
    > > > > > Hi,
    > > > > >
    > > > > > I just assembled a new system:
    > > > > >
    > > > > > P4P800-E Deluxe
    > > > > > P4 3.0
    > > > > > 2GB RAM
    > > > > > WD 120GB SATA drive
    > > > > > CD-RW/DVD
    > > > > >
    > > > > > When I first assembled the system, I put a Diamond ATI Radeon 7000
    > AGP
    > > > > video
    > > > > > card in. It worked perfectly. I have just exchanged the 7000 for
    a
    > > > > Matrox
    > > > > > G450 AGP card. For some reason, I'm now getting a slight flicker.
    > I
    > > > have
    > > > > > installed the most current Matrox driver and am using the same
    > > > resolution,
    > > > > > color depth and refresh rate that I was using on my previous PC
    with
    > > the
    > > > > > same Matrox G450 card.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > At the same time I switched the video cards, I switch the Logitech
    > > mouse
    > > > > > from PS/2 to USB. I can't imagine that would make a difference...
    > > would
    > > > > it?
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Are there any setting in the P4P800-E Deluxe BIOS that might be
    > > causing
    > > > > > this? I am using the most recent BIOS v.1002.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > John
    > > > > >
    > > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
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