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After flashing my BIOS to 1011, my MB is dead

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Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
July 19, 2004 11:24:15 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

I used the ASUSUpdate windows tool to update my A7V8X-X's BIOS and it failed
during Checksum verification after it flashed my BIOS. Now the computer is
totally DEAD. I can't even boot to floppy to re-flash my BIOS.

What can I do other than buy a new motherboard? Any help would be
appreciated. Also, why doesn't the CrashFree BIOS kicking in? It's suppose
to allow me to recover from BAD bios flashes.

Thanx in advance.
July 19, 2004 11:24:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

In article <zGKKc.55717$Mr4.17026@pd7tw1no>, "Hello" <hello@hello.com> wrote:

> I used the ASUSUpdate windows tool to update my A7V8X-X's BIOS and it failed
> during Checksum verification after it flashed my BIOS. Now the computer is
> totally DEAD. I can't even boot to floppy to re-flash my BIOS.
>
> What can I do other than buy a new motherboard? Any help would be
> appreciated. Also, why doesn't the CrashFree BIOS kicking in? It's suppose
> to allow me to recover from BAD bios flashes.
>
> Thanx in advance.

First of all, the flash isn't monolithic and made with just one piece
of code in it. It stores a number of pieces of information, but I'll
concentrate on the code portion.

There are two chunks of code. One chunk is called the Boot Block, the
other chunk is the Main BIOS Code. The Boot Block is the home of the
Crashfree routine, plus enough code to boot from a floppy, but perhaps
without the ability to drive an AGP video card.

There are several flashing methods for flashing a BIOS chip, and all
of them probably have some option to flash the Boot Block or the
Main BIOS code. However, if you say "Yes" to updating the Boot Block,
then if the Boot Block gets corrupted, then Crashfree won't work any
more. So, Crashfree is only available if you are flashing the Main
BIOS code (yes, this is stupid - Gigabyte fixes this with their Dual
BIOS chip solution).

In some of their updates, Asus gives special instructions for flashing
the BIOS, and what the special instructions or special tool (wrapper
script) are doing, is causing the Boot Block to get flashed. Any time
Asus does this, they are removing your "Crashfree" safety net, for
that one flash update.

I presume in your case, that you attempted to update both, and the
update failed.

The safest way to flash, is by booting a DOS floppy, and using the
version of DOS flasher provided on the Asus download site. When
booted in DOS, there isn't going to be a lot of pesky multitasking
going on, to upset the flash process, as there could be with a
Windows flasher.

A second consideration, is overclocking. If you are overclocking,
you would be well advised to return to stock settings. The reason
for this is, an overclocked board may be overclocking the LPC clock
to the flash chip, and violating the timing on the flash chip could
cause the flash process to fail.

Before using any flash method, always visit the Asus download page
for your motherboard. Frequently, there are various warnings, about
certain versions of the BIOS, not being flashable with certain of
the methods. You should always read the BIOS history link, or the
"More" links next to the various BIOS releases, for these warnings.
While I don't see any warnings for your board, you should
check there for yourself.

Finally, you don't have to RMA the board to get it running again.
There are a number of providers of BIOS flash chips. You pull out
the old one and install a new chip. The BIOS is usually socketed
and removable (the exception being the odd OEM board that has
the chip soldered to the motherboard, to save the small cost of
the socket). You can visit www.badflash.com for example, and see
what they charge. You can even contact Asus Tech Support (toll call)
and ask them for a phone number of an Asus person in your country
or area, who sells replacement chips. I think Asus sends the chip
by mail, so the transit time could be quite long. One of the
other services might use a courier to ship, reducing the wait and
increasing the price.

There are some other methods for flashing, such as "hot flashing",
but this requires finding a board that uses a similar flash interface,
removing that boards BIOS chip while the computer is running, then
inserting the dead flash chip and reflashing it. There is some danger
to this procedure (like if the LPC flash chip gets rotated in the
socket and shorts to the wrong pins), and I don't recommend this for
the average user. (Hell, I wouldn't do that myself!)

Buying a replacement BIOS chip is more likely to yield a working
motherboard and a reasonably cheap lesson about what flash tools
are good and what ones are bad. If you feel particularly accident
prone, buying a BIOS Savior (ioss.com.tw) is one way to guarantee
this doesn't happen again. To use the BIOS Savior, you need at least
one good BIOS image, and unless you live near a vendor like Eksit,
who are willing to program the BIOS Savior before sending it to
you, you will need the services of badflash.com and the purchase
of the BIOS Savior as well.

Before removing the current flash chip. make a diagram of the
orientation of the chip. The chip will have a "dot" on it, and
that may be lined up with a triangle marking on the socket. Make
sure the dot on the replacement chip is aligned the same way.
If the replacement flash chip doesn't come with a chip puller,
a nimble person can pull the flash chip, using a pointed tool,
like an awl. Be careful to lift the chip equally on all sides as
it is extracted. Similarly, press equally on all sides when inserting
the new chip. If the chip is inserted/extracted crooked, pins can
get bent. You can also get a very nice tool from Radio Shack,
for pulling PLCC chips, that should work as well. It costs $10.

HTH,
Paul
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
July 19, 2004 12:43:31 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

"Hello" <hello@hello.com> wrote in message
news:zGKKc.55717$Mr4.17026@pd7tw1no...
> I used the ASUSUpdate windows tool to update my A7V8X-X's BIOS and it
failed
> during Checksum verification after it flashed my BIOS. Now the computer
is
> totally DEAD. I can't even boot to floppy to re-flash my BIOS.
>
> What can I do other than buy a new motherboard? Any help would be
> appreciated. Also, why doesn't the CrashFree BIOS kicking in? It's
suppose
> to allow me to recover from BAD bios flashes.
>
> Thanx in advance.
>
>

You need to read about upgrading your bios..
If it fail'd checksum verification then that means you needed to reflash
either the old bios or try the new one again (but I think you restarted your
pc to just see if it would be okay)


The CrashFree Bios doesnt just "kick in"..
Go Read about it..
It's Just as easy to do but you need to read how to do it.
Related resources
July 19, 2004 4:52:43 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

Fascinating read paul thanks!

"Paul" <nospam@needed.com> wrote in message
news:nospam-1907040609230001@192.168.1.177...
> In article <zGKKc.55717$Mr4.17026@pd7tw1no>, "Hello" <hello@hello.com>
wrote:
>
> > I used the ASUSUpdate windows tool to update my A7V8X-X's BIOS and it
failed
> > during Checksum verification after it flashed my BIOS. Now the computer
is
> > totally DEAD. I can't even boot to floppy to re-flash my BIOS.
> >
> > What can I do other than buy a new motherboard? Any help would be
> > appreciated. Also, why doesn't the CrashFree BIOS kicking in? It's
suppose
> > to allow me to recover from BAD bios flashes.
> >
> > Thanx in advance.
>
> First of all, the flash isn't monolithic and made with just one piece
> of code in it. It stores a number of pieces of information, but I'll
> concentrate on the code portion.
>
> There are two chunks of code. One chunk is called the Boot Block, the
> other chunk is the Main BIOS Code. The Boot Block is the home of the
> Crashfree routine, plus enough code to boot from a floppy, but perhaps
> without the ability to drive an AGP video card.
>
> There are several flashing methods for flashing a BIOS chip, and all
> of them probably have some option to flash the Boot Block or the
> Main BIOS code. However, if you say "Yes" to updating the Boot Block,
> then if the Boot Block gets corrupted, then Crashfree won't work any
> more. So, Crashfree is only available if you are flashing the Main
> BIOS code (yes, this is stupid - Gigabyte fixes this with their Dual
> BIOS chip solution).
>
> In some of their updates, Asus gives special instructions for flashing
> the BIOS, and what the special instructions or special tool (wrapper
> script) are doing, is causing the Boot Block to get flashed. Any time
> Asus does this, they are removing your "Crashfree" safety net, for
> that one flash update.
>
> I presume in your case, that you attempted to update both, and the
> update failed.
>
> The safest way to flash, is by booting a DOS floppy, and using the
> version of DOS flasher provided on the Asus download site. When
> booted in DOS, there isn't going to be a lot of pesky multitasking
> going on, to upset the flash process, as there could be with a
> Windows flasher.
>
> A second consideration, is overclocking. If you are overclocking,
> you would be well advised to return to stock settings. The reason
> for this is, an overclocked board may be overclocking the LPC clock
> to the flash chip, and violating the timing on the flash chip could
> cause the flash process to fail.
>
> Before using any flash method, always visit the Asus download page
> for your motherboard. Frequently, there are various warnings, about
> certain versions of the BIOS, not being flashable with certain of
> the methods. You should always read the BIOS history link, or the
> "More" links next to the various BIOS releases, for these warnings.
> While I don't see any warnings for your board, you should
> check there for yourself.
>
> Finally, you don't have to RMA the board to get it running again.
> There are a number of providers of BIOS flash chips. You pull out
> the old one and install a new chip. The BIOS is usually socketed
> and removable (the exception being the odd OEM board that has
> the chip soldered to the motherboard, to save the small cost of
> the socket). You can visit www.badflash.com for example, and see
> what they charge. You can even contact Asus Tech Support (toll call)
> and ask them for a phone number of an Asus person in your country
> or area, who sells replacement chips. I think Asus sends the chip
> by mail, so the transit time could be quite long. One of the
> other services might use a courier to ship, reducing the wait and
> increasing the price.
>
> There are some other methods for flashing, such as "hot flashing",
> but this requires finding a board that uses a similar flash interface,
> removing that boards BIOS chip while the computer is running, then
> inserting the dead flash chip and reflashing it. There is some danger
> to this procedure (like if the LPC flash chip gets rotated in the
> socket and shorts to the wrong pins), and I don't recommend this for
> the average user. (Hell, I wouldn't do that myself!)
>
> Buying a replacement BIOS chip is more likely to yield a working
> motherboard and a reasonably cheap lesson about what flash tools
> are good and what ones are bad. If you feel particularly accident
> prone, buying a BIOS Savior (ioss.com.tw) is one way to guarantee
> this doesn't happen again. To use the BIOS Savior, you need at least
> one good BIOS image, and unless you live near a vendor like Eksit,
> who are willing to program the BIOS Savior before sending it to
> you, you will need the services of badflash.com and the purchase
> of the BIOS Savior as well.
>
> Before removing the current flash chip. make a diagram of the
> orientation of the chip. The chip will have a "dot" on it, and
> that may be lined up with a triangle marking on the socket. Make
> sure the dot on the replacement chip is aligned the same way.
> If the replacement flash chip doesn't come with a chip puller,
> a nimble person can pull the flash chip, using a pointed tool,
> like an awl. Be careful to lift the chip equally on all sides as
> it is extracted. Similarly, press equally on all sides when inserting
> the new chip. If the chip is inserted/extracted crooked, pins can
> get bent. You can also get a very nice tool from Radio Shack,
> for pulling PLCC chips, that should work as well. It costs $10.
>
> HTH,
> Paul
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
July 20, 2004 3:12:18 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

Flashing the BIOS is an iffy thing; as you unfortunately found out.

--
DaveW



"Hello" <hello@hello.com> wrote in message
news:zGKKc.55717$Mr4.17026@pd7tw1no...
> I used the ASUSUpdate windows tool to update my A7V8X-X's BIOS and it
failed
> during Checksum verification after it flashed my BIOS. Now the computer
is
> totally DEAD. I can't even boot to floppy to re-flash my BIOS.
>
> What can I do other than buy a new motherboard? Any help would be
> appreciated. Also, why doesn't the CrashFree BIOS kicking in? It's
suppose
> to allow me to recover from BAD bios flashes.
>
> Thanx in advance.
>
>
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
July 20, 2004 4:39:27 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

wow...thanx Paul....that's alot of detaisl. Yes I know I shouldn't have
flashed it even though I've done the same thing many other times and had no
problems.
I used ASUSUpdae (in Windows) and there might have been a check mark that
says to also flash the BOOT BLOCK
but I didn't pay too much attention. Why have something that could kill
your MB be the default setting?
Atleast ASUS should have it unchecked and let the user decide.

I'm hooped and I know it.....have to spend some $$ to take out the BIOS chip
and get it flashed or buy a new MB.

"Paul" <nospam@needed.com> wrote in message
news:nospam-1907040609230001@192.168.1.177...
> In article <zGKKc.55717$Mr4.17026@pd7tw1no>, "Hello" <hello@hello.com>
wrote:
>
> > I used the ASUSUpdate windows tool to update my A7V8X-X's BIOS and it
failed
> > during Checksum verification after it flashed my BIOS. Now the computer
is
> > totally DEAD. I can't even boot to floppy to re-flash my BIOS.
> >
> > What can I do other than buy a new motherboard? Any help would be
> > appreciated. Also, why doesn't the CrashFree BIOS kicking in? It's
suppose
> > to allow me to recover from BAD bios flashes.
> >
> > Thanx in advance.
>
> First of all, the flash isn't monolithic and made with just one piece
> of code in it. It stores a number of pieces of information, but I'll
> concentrate on the code portion.
>
> There are two chunks of code. One chunk is called the Boot Block, the
> other chunk is the Main BIOS Code. The Boot Block is the home of the
> Crashfree routine, plus enough code to boot from a floppy, but perhaps
> without the ability to drive an AGP video card.
>
> There are several flashing methods for flashing a BIOS chip, and all
> of them probably have some option to flash the Boot Block or the
> Main BIOS code. However, if you say "Yes" to updating the Boot Block,
> then if the Boot Block gets corrupted, then Crashfree won't work any
> more. So, Crashfree is only available if you are flashing the Main
> BIOS code (yes, this is stupid - Gigabyte fixes this with their Dual
> BIOS chip solution).
>
> In some of their updates, Asus gives special instructions for flashing
> the BIOS, and what the special instructions or special tool (wrapper
> script) are doing, is causing the Boot Block to get flashed. Any time
> Asus does this, they are removing your "Crashfree" safety net, for
> that one flash update.
>
> I presume in your case, that you attempted to update both, and the
> update failed.
>
> The safest way to flash, is by booting a DOS floppy, and using the
> version of DOS flasher provided on the Asus download site. When
> booted in DOS, there isn't going to be a lot of pesky multitasking
> going on, to upset the flash process, as there could be with a
> Windows flasher.
>
> A second consideration, is overclocking. If you are overclocking,
> you would be well advised to return to stock settings. The reason
> for this is, an overclocked board may be overclocking the LPC clock
> to the flash chip, and violating the timing on the flash chip could
> cause the flash process to fail.
>
> Before using any flash method, always visit the Asus download page
> for your motherboard. Frequently, there are various warnings, about
> certain versions of the BIOS, not being flashable with certain of
> the methods. You should always read the BIOS history link, or the
> "More" links next to the various BIOS releases, for these warnings.
> While I don't see any warnings for your board, you should
> check there for yourself.
>
> Finally, you don't have to RMA the board to get it running again.
> There are a number of providers of BIOS flash chips. You pull out
> the old one and install a new chip. The BIOS is usually socketed
> and removable (the exception being the odd OEM board that has
> the chip soldered to the motherboard, to save the small cost of
> the socket). You can visit www.badflash.com for example, and see
> what they charge. You can even contact Asus Tech Support (toll call)
> and ask them for a phone number of an Asus person in your country
> or area, who sells replacement chips. I think Asus sends the chip
> by mail, so the transit time could be quite long. One of the
> other services might use a courier to ship, reducing the wait and
> increasing the price.
>
> There are some other methods for flashing, such as "hot flashing",
> but this requires finding a board that uses a similar flash interface,
> removing that boards BIOS chip while the computer is running, then
> inserting the dead flash chip and reflashing it. There is some danger
> to this procedure (like if the LPC flash chip gets rotated in the
> socket and shorts to the wrong pins), and I don't recommend this for
> the average user. (Hell, I wouldn't do that myself!)
>
> Buying a replacement BIOS chip is more likely to yield a working
> motherboard and a reasonably cheap lesson about what flash tools
> are good and what ones are bad. If you feel particularly accident
> prone, buying a BIOS Savior (ioss.com.tw) is one way to guarantee
> this doesn't happen again. To use the BIOS Savior, you need at least
> one good BIOS image, and unless you live near a vendor like Eksit,
> who are willing to program the BIOS Savior before sending it to
> you, you will need the services of badflash.com and the purchase
> of the BIOS Savior as well.
>
> Before removing the current flash chip. make a diagram of the
> orientation of the chip. The chip will have a "dot" on it, and
> that may be lined up with a triangle marking on the socket. Make
> sure the dot on the replacement chip is aligned the same way.
> If the replacement flash chip doesn't come with a chip puller,
> a nimble person can pull the flash chip, using a pointed tool,
> like an awl. Be careful to lift the chip equally on all sides as
> it is extracted. Similarly, press equally on all sides when inserting
> the new chip. If the chip is inserted/extracted crooked, pins can
> get bent. You can also get a very nice tool from Radio Shack,
> for pulling PLCC chips, that should work as well. It costs $10.
>
> HTH,
> Paul
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
July 20, 2004 4:49:08 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

NEVER flash a bios under Windows. Either do it under DOS, or do it from
the BIOS update feature built into the most recent BIOS'. But NEVER do
it under Windows.


Hello wrote:
> I used the ASUSUpdate windows tool to update my A7V8X-X's BIOS and it failed
> during Checksum verification after it flashed my BIOS. Now the computer is
> totally DEAD. I can't even boot to floppy to re-flash my BIOS.
>
> What can I do other than buy a new motherboard? Any help would be
> appreciated. Also, why doesn't the CrashFree BIOS kicking in? It's suppose
> to allow me to recover from BAD bios flashes.
>
> Thanx in advance.
>
>
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
July 20, 2004 4:49:09 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

Asus will send you another Bios chip via Fedex for under $20, at least that
was cost for me a year or so back. lol


"Barry Watzman" <WatzmanNOSPAM@neo.rr.com> wrote in message
news:40FC6C47.6030108@neo.rr.com...
> NEVER flash a bios under Windows. Either do it under DOS, or do it from
> the BIOS update feature built into the most recent BIOS'. But NEVER do
> it under Windows.
>
>
> Hello wrote:
> > I used the ASUSUpdate windows tool to update my A7V8X-X's BIOS and it
failed
> > during Checksum verification after it flashed my BIOS. Now the computer
is
> > totally DEAD. I can't even boot to floppy to re-flash my BIOS.
> >
> > What can I do other than buy a new motherboard? Any help would be
> > appreciated. Also, why doesn't the CrashFree BIOS kicking in? It's
suppose
> > to allow me to recover from BAD bios flashes.
> >
> > Thanx in advance.
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
July 20, 2004 5:12:23 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

"DaveW" <none@zero.org> wrote in message
news:lzYKc.134839$Oq2.99457@attbi_s52...
> Flashing the BIOS is an iffy thing; as you unfortunately found out.
>
> --
> DaveW
>

It's only iffy if your doing it wrong or using someone elses bogus code..
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
July 20, 2004 8:15:49 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

"DaveW" <none@zero.org> wrote in message
news:lzYKc.134839$Oq2.99457@attbi_s52...
> Flashing the BIOS is an iffy thing; as you unfortunately found out.
>
> --
> DaveW
>

It's only iffy if your doing it wrong or using someone elses bogus code..



Not if you have Gigabyte board. If you hose the main bios it will boot up off
the back up and then you can fix the main bios......................
July 23, 2004 2:07:02 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

Hi,

Odd you should say that. A GB board I have is the first one that I have ever
had that required frequent cmos clear operations and booting off the
alternate bios to work out a stable config. So it would appear for this to
be better appreciated, one needs to include iffy BIOS's provided by the mobo
vendor. No wonder they have 2 bios chips. As I have said before, I would
rather have 1 bios chip with a bios that works than 2 with bios' that don't.

If you read through this news group, most of the dead bios issues are user
error and from curiosity rather than necessity.

- Tim


"Courseyauto" <courseyauto@aol.com> wrote in message
news:20040720121549.24956.00000110@mb-m20.aol.com...
> "DaveW" <none@zero.org> wrote in message
> news:lzYKc.134839$Oq2.99457@attbi_s52...
>> Flashing the BIOS is an iffy thing; as you unfortunately found out.
>>
>> --
>> DaveW
>>
>
> It's only iffy if your doing it wrong or using someone elses bogus code..
>
>
>
> Not if you have Gigabyte board. If you hose the main bios it will boot
> up off
> the back up and then you can fix the main bios......................
!