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Did I Destroy My A7V BIOS??

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Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
July 19, 2004 10:02:23 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

Hi All,

I did a very stupid thing tonight. I wanted to upgrade my CPU from an
Athlon 850 to a Athlon 1.3GHz on a A7V (PC133/VC133). The BIOS I was
running was 1007 and I wanted to upgrade to the latest: 1011. I'm
running XP Pro and I created a boot floppy. I booted to the floppy
and I flashed the EPROM with the revision "successfully". But, when I
restarted the system, I got nothing! Have I destroyed the BIOS chip?
If so, can it be replaced? If you're going to scold me for this,
bring it on! I deserve it for making such a bonehead move. I should
have done this with a true DOS boot floopy right?

TIA

More about : destroy a7v bios

Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
July 21, 2004 2:18:36 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

Robert Nurse wrote:
> Hi All,
>
> I did a very stupid thing tonight. I wanted to upgrade my CPU from an
> Athlon 850 to a Athlon 1.3GHz on a A7V (PC133/VC133). The BIOS I was
> running was 1007 and I wanted to upgrade to the latest: 1011. I'm
> running XP Pro and I created a boot floppy. I booted to the floppy
> and I flashed the EPROM with the revision "successfully". But, when I
> restarted the system, I got nothing! Have I destroyed the BIOS chip?
> If so, can it be replaced? If you're going to scold me for this,
> bring it on! I deserve it for making such a bonehead move. I should
> have done this with a true DOS boot floopy right?
>
> TIA
Like Paul says try clearing the cmos first. Before shorting the solder
pads, make sure to unplug the powersupply and wait for supply caps to
discharge (mobo power LED off) . If that fails to fix the problem then
try changing the JEN jumper (page 18 in the manual). If it is set to
auto then try changing it to manual making sure to set the correct
frequency (pg 21) based on on mobo rev level and installed processor. If
you are currently set on manual, try setting to auto. After a successful
boot to bios, go in and load the default settings. Afterwards, you can
change the JEN jumper to whatever you want.
In between these changes you may find it necessary to clear the CMOS again.
I'm not sure what kind of boot floppy you made in is should be DOS with
minimal drivers to reduce the risk of running low on memory. The safest
bet is to simply create one using "Dr DOS Disk For Bios Flashing" which
is specifically for bios flashing.
http://www.bootdisk.com/
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
July 21, 2004 2:18:37 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

It happened to my A7V as well. As Tomcas said switching from Jumper free to
jumper mode fixed mine.

Also, You can call Asus tech support and they will either send you a new
bios chip for a small charge or you can send old bios to them and they will
reprogram and send back to you for around $10, or at least use to. lol.


"tomcas" <tomcas@NOSPAMmjwebsitedesign.com> wrote in message
news:0TgLc.64730$S45.7595891@news4.srv.hcvlny.cv.net...
> Robert Nurse wrote:
> > Hi All,
> >
> > I did a very stupid thing tonight. I wanted to upgrade my CPU from an
> > Athlon 850 to a Athlon 1.3GHz on a A7V (PC133/VC133). The BIOS I was
> > running was 1007 and I wanted to upgrade to the latest: 1011. I'm
> > running XP Pro and I created a boot floppy. I booted to the floppy
> > and I flashed the EPROM with the revision "successfully". But, when I
> > restarted the system, I got nothing! Have I destroyed the BIOS chip?
> > If so, can it be replaced? If you're going to scold me for this,
> > bring it on! I deserve it for making such a bonehead move. I should
> > have done this with a true DOS boot floopy right?
> >
> > TIA
> Like Paul says try clearing the cmos first. Before shorting the solder
> pads, make sure to unplug the powersupply and wait for supply caps to
> discharge (mobo power LED off) . If that fails to fix the problem then
> try changing the JEN jumper (page 18 in the manual). If it is set to
> auto then try changing it to manual making sure to set the correct
> frequency (pg 21) based on on mobo rev level and installed processor. If
> you are currently set on manual, try setting to auto. After a successful
> boot to bios, go in and load the default settings. Afterwards, you can
> change the JEN jumper to whatever you want.
> In between these changes you may find it necessary to clear the CMOS
again.
> I'm not sure what kind of boot floppy you made in is should be DOS with
> minimal drivers to reduce the risk of running low on memory. The safest
> bet is to simply create one using "Dr DOS Disk For Bios Flashing" which
> is specifically for bios flashing.
> http://www.bootdisk.com/
>
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
July 22, 2004 11:22:45 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

I sent the BIOS chip to BadFlash.com. They reprogram BIOS chips. I
never thought to ask ASUS for help. I didn't think they helped
end-users.

"Spore" <jefflangner@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:<10frit0priier28@corp.supernews.com>...
> It happened to my A7V as well. As Tomcas said switching from Jumper free to
> jumper mode fixed mine.
>
> Also, You can call Asus tech support and they will either send you a new
> bios chip for a small charge or you can send old bios to them and they will
> reprogram and send back to you for around $10, or at least use to. lol.
>
>
> "tomcas" <tomcas@NOSPAMmjwebsitedesign.com> wrote in message
> news:0TgLc.64730$S45.7595891@news4.srv.hcvlny.cv.net...
> > Robert Nurse wrote:
> > > Hi All,
> > >
> > > I did a very stupid thing tonight. I wanted to upgrade my CPU from an
> > > Athlon 850 to a Athlon 1.3GHz on a A7V (PC133/VC133). The BIOS I was
> > > running was 1007 and I wanted to upgrade to the latest: 1011. I'm
> > > running XP Pro and I created a boot floppy. I booted to the floppy
> > > and I flashed the EPROM with the revision "successfully". But, when I
> > > restarted the system, I got nothing! Have I destroyed the BIOS chip?
> > > If so, can it be replaced? If you're going to scold me for this,
> > > bring it on! I deserve it for making such a bonehead move. I should
> > > have done this with a true DOS boot floopy right?
> > >
> > > TIA
> > Like Paul says try clearing the cmos first. Before shorting the solder
> > pads, make sure to unplug the powersupply and wait for supply caps to
> > discharge (mobo power LED off) . If that fails to fix the problem then
> > try changing the JEN jumper (page 18 in the manual). If it is set to
> > auto then try changing it to manual making sure to set the correct
> > frequency (pg 21) based on on mobo rev level and installed processor. If
> > you are currently set on manual, try setting to auto. After a successful
> > boot to bios, go in and load the default settings. Afterwards, you can
> > change the JEN jumper to whatever you want.
> > In between these changes you may find it necessary to clear the CMOS
> again.
> > I'm not sure what kind of boot floppy you made in is should be DOS with
> > minimal drivers to reduce the risk of running low on memory. The safest
> > bet is to simply create one using "Dr DOS Disk For Bios Flashing" which
> > is specifically for bios flashing.
> > http://www.bootdisk.com/
> >
!