Did I buy the wrong HD?

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

mobo is P4C800ed with p4 2.8c, EN-7250 360w case (would the PSU have a
SATA power connector?), ordered a Maxtor 80GB 8MB cache Ultra ATA133.
My thinking was that I wanted to keep everything 'native' to the OS so
I wouldn't have to install any extra drivers to partition/format, set
up an array? what's that about and why isn't that native?

Would I have been better off getting the SATA version of the HD?

What do you have to do differently than with parallel ATA IDE to use
SATA? is SATA native?

What are the advantages and disadvantages of SATA vs PATA IDE?

For a comparison, I looked at an Intel D865GBF manual and it says:
"for compatibility, serial ATA (SATA) functionality is transparent to
the operating system. The serial ATA controller can operate in both
legacy and native modes...Native mode is preferred...using Windows XP"

Is this the same case for the P4C800ed? The Intel manual doesn't
mention setting up arrays. The Asus manual has a lot on arrays.
(promise raid?)
5 answers Last reply
More about wrong
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <3a716bf0.0407261652.78274143@posting.google.com>,
    jfclay@yahoo.com (jf) wrote:

    > mobo is P4C800ed with p4 2.8c, EN-7250 360w case (would the PSU have a
    > SATA power connector?), ordered a Maxtor 80GB 8MB cache Ultra ATA133.
    > My thinking was that I wanted to keep everything 'native' to the OS so
    > I wouldn't have to install any extra drivers to partition/format, set
    > up an array? what's that about and why isn't that native?
    >
    > Would I have been better off getting the SATA version of the HD?
    >
    > What do you have to do differently than with parallel ATA IDE to use
    > SATA? is SATA native?
    >
    > What are the advantages and disadvantages of SATA vs PATA IDE?
    >
    > For a comparison, I looked at an Intel D865GBF manual and it says:
    > "for compatibility, serial ATA (SATA) functionality is transparent to
    > the operating system. The serial ATA controller can operate in both
    > legacy and native modes...Native mode is preferred...using Windows XP"
    >
    > Is this the same case for the P4C800ed? The Intel manual doesn't
    > mention setting up arrays. The Asus manual has a lot on arrays.
    > (promise raid?)

    The downloadable manual can be found here. The sequence of URLs
    shows the screens you should see. To save time, just click the
    last one.

    http://www.asus.com.tw/support/download/download.aspx

    http://www.asus.com.tw/support/download/item.aspx?ModelName=P4C800-E%20Deluxe&Type=All&SLanguage=en-us

    http://www.asus.com.tw/support/download/selectftp.aspx?l1_id=1&l2_id=15&l3_id=20&m_id=3&f_name=e1347b_p4c800-e_deluxe.pdf~zaqwedc

    http://www.asus.com.tw/pub/ASUS/mb/sock478/P4C800E-DX/e1347b_p4c800-e_deluxe.pdf

    PDF page 50 and PDF page 79, have basically the same info as the
    Intel manual. For SATA connected to the ICH5R Southbridge, you
    can run in non-RAID mode, and use either Enhanced or Compatible
    mode, depending on which OS you are booting. The Intel hardware
    magically makes the SATA look like a PATA drive.

    As for the advantages of SATA, I don't own any, and as a disk drive
    is still media limited (i.e. not using the full bandwidth of the
    wiring), the only thing you might see, is the ability to fill the
    small cache on the disk drive a little faster. Translated into
    English, when transferring extremely large files, a disk that spins
    fast (10000 RPM) is worth more to you than any fancy wiring. For
    small files, SATA would normally help, except with the use of
    bridge chips, you aren't really able to use the full cable rate
    anyway. I guess now you understand why I don't own any SATA drives.
    By using PATA, I can transfer my drive to any of my other computers.
    With a SATA drive, right now only my P4C800-E Deluxe could drive it.
    What you choose, may depend on how much legacy equipment you own.

    For the cabling, the SATA drive cable is slimmer, but I read occasional
    reports of it being easier to make the cables fall off with SATA drives.
    The PATA drive cables block more of your air flow, but won't fall
    off.

    HTH,
    Paul
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    jf wrote:
    > mobo is P4C800ed with p4 2.8c, EN-7250 360w case (would the PSU have a
    > SATA power connector?), ordered a Maxtor 80GB 8MB cache Ultra ATA133.
    > My thinking was that I wanted to keep everything 'native' to the OS so
    > I wouldn't have to install any extra drivers to partition/format, set
    > up an array? what's that about and why isn't that native?

    The Maxtor ATA133 drive would be more "native" to the OS since SATA drivers
    do not need to be added by floppy, during install.
    The PSU may or may not have the SATA power connector. Ask your dealer for an
    adapter.
    >
    > Would I have been better off getting the SATA version of the HD?

    Not really.

    The SATA drive is no faster. The only advantage is the thinner cable, at
    present. The WD Raptor series of 10K RPM SATA drives are faster, because of
    rotational speed, not the SATA interface.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    "S.Heenan" <sheenan@wahs.ac> wrote in message news:<pRsNc.121162$Mr4.55110@pd7tw1no>...
    > jf wrote:
    > > mobo is P4C800ed with p4 2.8c, EN-7250 360w case (would the PSU have a
    > > SATA power connector?), ordered a Maxtor 80GB 8MB cache Ultra ATA133.
    > > My thinking was that I wanted to keep everything 'native' to the OS so
    > > I wouldn't have to install any extra drivers to partition/format, set
    > > up an array? what's that about and why isn't that native?
    >
    > The Maxtor ATA133 drive would be more "native" to the OS since SATA drivers
    > do not need to be added by floppy, during install.
    > The PSU may or may not have the SATA power connector. Ask your dealer for an
    > adapter.
    > >
    > > Would I have been better off getting the SATA version of the HD?
    >
    > Not really.
    >
    > The SATA drive is no faster. The only advantage is the thinner cable, at
    > present. The WD Raptor series of 10K RPM SATA drives are faster, because of
    > rotational speed, not the SATA interface.

    by using SATA on the P4C800, does that free up an IDE channel? So i
    could have 4 devices total on IDE (2 per IDE Channel) and 2 SATA
    devices?
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <3a716bf0.0407271107.672e1610@posting.google.com>,
    jfclay@yahoo.com (jf) wrote:

    > "S.Heenan" <sheenan@wahs.ac> wrote in message
    news:<pRsNc.121162$Mr4.55110@pd7tw1no>...
    > > jf wrote:
    > > > mobo is P4C800ed with p4 2.8c, EN-7250 360w case (would the PSU have a
    > > > SATA power connector?), ordered a Maxtor 80GB 8MB cache Ultra ATA133.
    > > > My thinking was that I wanted to keep everything 'native' to the OS so
    > > > I wouldn't have to install any extra drivers to partition/format, set
    > > > up an array? what's that about and why isn't that native?
    > >
    > > The Maxtor ATA133 drive would be more "native" to the OS since SATA drivers
    > > do not need to be added by floppy, during install.
    > > The PSU may or may not have the SATA power connector. Ask your dealer for an
    > > adapter.
    > > >
    > > > Would I have been better off getting the SATA version of the HD?
    > >
    > > Not really.
    > >
    > > The SATA drive is no faster. The only advantage is the thinner cable, at
    > > present. The WD Raptor series of 10K RPM SATA drives are faster, because of
    > > rotational speed, not the SATA interface.
    >
    > by using SATA on the P4C800, does that free up an IDE channel? So i
    > could have 4 devices total on IDE (2 per IDE Channel) and 2 SATA
    > devices?

    The Southbridge drive interfaces are arranged in "groups":

    Group1 PATA1 Master+Slave
    Group2 PATA2 Master+Slave
    Group3 SATA1+SATA2

    In an OS like Win98, which needs the "Compatible" BIOS setting,
    you can use two of three groups. One group must remain unused.

    With a modern OS like Win2K/WinXP, you can use all three groups
    via the BIOS "Enhanced" mode.

    HTH,
    Paul
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    On 27 Jul 2004 12:07:25 -0700, jfclay@yahoo.com (jf) wrote:

    > by using SATA on the P4C800, does that free up an IDE channel?
    > So i could have 4 devices total on IDE (2 per IDE Channel)
    > and 2 SATA devices?

    Yes, if you use Windows 2000 or XP.
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