Help needed with HP5650

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Just bought one of these printers.

How on bloody earth do you fit the ink cartridges!?!?!?!?

Follow the limited instruction manual, which says put paper in tray->turn
printer on->open printer cover->lift cartridge latch->slide cartridge in

but it doesn't seem to work? there is a bit of black plastic in front of
where the cartridges go, the pictures in the instructions show it as being
up when cart is in place, but magically down when either inserting or
removing ink cart wothout saying how this comes to be.

I have checked for any kind of restraining devices but non are obvious.

I may be missing something blindingly obvious but I have never owned a HP
printer before.

TIA
--
Les
AMD64 3200+
2x512 MB corsair platinum 3500
ASUS K8V
Herc 9700 Pro
SB Audigy
11 answers Last reply
More about help needed hp5650
  1. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Sun, 25 Apr 2004 08:53:27 +0100, "Les" <a@aolnot.com> wrote:

    >Just bought one of these printers.
    >
    >How on bloody earth do you fit the ink cartridges!?!?!?!?
    >
    >Follow the limited instruction manual, which says put paper in tray->turn
    >printer on->open printer cover->lift cartridge latch->slide cartridge in
    >
    >but it doesn't seem to work? there is a bit of black plastic in front of
    >where the cartridges go,

    A "bit" of black plastic? Not on my 5650. There is only the plastic
    latch, with cartridge number printed on it, that is to be first
    lifted. What shape is the "bit"? How is it fastened? Perhaps
    someone put some extra packing in your machine.

    >the pictures in the instructions show it as being
    >up when cart is in place, but magically down when either inserting or
    >removing ink cart wothout saying how this comes to be.

    The latch (black) is, of course, up when inserting the cartridge and
    down when after the cartridge is in place and the printer is usable.

    >I have checked for any kind of restraining devices but non are obvious.

    Devices that restrain what, the cartridge? There is the latch that
    you lift only while inserting the cartridge.

    There is a fixed metal support under which the cartridge must be
    inserted, with its type number facing upward (and the protective tape
    removed from covering the jets of the cartridge). I was puzzled for a
    while before I realized that the cartridge has to be inserted UNDER
    this metal strip.

    >I may be missing something blindingly obvious but I have never owned a HP
    >printer before.

    I bought my 5650 after my 932c gave out and nobody could economically
    find out its problem and fix it. I only bought the 5650 because I
    wanted a printer that could automatically print on both sides of a
    sheet of paper. (An additional "duplexer" is needed for this.)
    Otherwise, I would have bought anything but HP. While I think HP
    inkjet printers printer more beautifully and faster, the company is
    about the worst as far as providing instructions and tech support that
    anyone can understand, and the tech support people neither understand
    much of anything nor are ever given the knowledge they need to
    usefully answer qurestions. I have been fighting with several levels
    of them on both of these printers I have bought. A letter to the
    printer division chief's office only got me a call from another
    tech-support level.

    My next attempt to get useful info on the 5650 will be to take the
    names of HP printer engineers listed as inventors within patent
    applications, which applications I have viewed online at the US Patent
    and Trademark Office Website -- and to try reaching them by phone,
    possibly using adjacent phone numbers, until I get someone who has
    actually had his hands on a 5650 or very similar machine and knows how
    to make it work right. The hard-copy instructions for the 5650 are
    almost negligible, the instructions in the software supplied with it
    very little better and the manual on the HP site also of little use.
    And the HP site, as a whole, is near chaos.

    If anyone has had luck in getting through to an HP-printer test (or
    design) ENGINEER, I'd like to learn how this was done.

    Ray
  2. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "Raymond A. Chamberlin" <raych@znet.com> wrote in message
    news:ljm3905ose67vdqqq8ho3077pgmre3l092@4ax.com...

    > My next attempt to get useful info on the 5650 will be to take the
    > names of HP printer engineers listed as inventors within patent
    > applications, which applications I have viewed online at the US Patent
    > and Trademark Office Website -- and to try reaching them by phone,
    > possibly using adjacent phone numbers, until I get someone who has
    > actually had his hands on a 5650 or very similar machine and knows how
    > to make it work right.
    [snip]
    > If anyone has had luck in getting through to an HP-printer test (or
    > design) ENGINEER, I'd like to learn how this was done.

    What exactly is the problem you are trying to solve? You could post questions
    here, or try the online forum at:
    http://forums1.itrc.hp.com/service/forums/bizsupport/categoryhome.do?categoryId=220
    or
    http://forums1.itrc.hp.com/service/forums/bizsupport/categoryhome.do?categoryId=415 .

    Regards,
    Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
  3. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Thu, 29 Apr 2004 22:57:55 -0700, "Bob Headrick" <bobh@proaxis.com>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Raymond A. Chamberlin" <raych@znet.com> wrote in message
    >news:ljm3905ose67vdqqq8ho3077pgmre3l092@4ax.com...
    >
    >> My next attempt to get useful info on the 5650 will be to take the
    >> names of HP printer engineers listed as inventors within patent
    >> applications, which applications I have viewed online at the US Patent
    >> and Trademark Office Website -- and to try reaching them by phone,
    >> possibly using adjacent phone numbers, until I get someone who has
    >> actually had his hands on a 5650 or very similar machine and knows how
    >> to make it work right.
    >[snip]
    >> If anyone has had luck in getting through to an HP-printer test (or
    >> design) ENGINEER, I'd like to learn how this was done.
    >
    >What exactly is the problem you are trying to solve? You could post questions
    >here, or try the online forum at:
    >http://forums1.itrc.hp.com/service/forums/bizsupport/categoryhome.do?categoryId=220
    >or
    >http://forums1.itrc.hp.com/service/forums/bizsupport/categoryhome.do?categoryId=415 .
    >
    >Regards,
    >Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
    >

    Hmm. OK, I'll try it first here. Maybe, by doing so in this thread,
    I'm sort of commandeering another's post, and also losing review of
    this post by whomever already read and did not relate to the first
    post of this thread -- thereby putting the thread out of mind. But
    the title of the thread covers this.

    Actually, I have several questions/problems on/with the 5650 that I
    can't understand/correct. I'll try just the simplest describable (and
    possibly resolvable) one first. All my concerns are in this context:

    Win98SE
    html or txt documents
    8 1/2 x 11 plain copy paper
    HP 5650, Ser. No. MY38R3K1C4 (Malaysia), purch'd 2/28/04 from Office
    Depot, pkgd as brand new
    HP 8955A duplexer installed in printer, Ser. No. Y3C91N2KT (Malaysia),
    purch'd 2/29/04 from HP.com online
    Printer driver: 5600_enu_win98x_me.exe, v. 9.4.2.0 (current)
    2-sided printing set as default
    Fast Normal print-quality mode of the 5650
    Print cartridges installed: 56 (black) (genuine unrefilled HP
    installed after depletion of same, full-19-ml cartridge
    supplied w/ printer), 57 (non-photo color) (full 17-ml
    supplied w/ printer
    Single IN tray
    Parallel connection to computer w/ Intel D850GB m'board w/ 1.4 GHz P4
    processor
    Geodetic coordinates upon request ;-)

    Problem: Neither the black nor the color on-screen
    approximate-ink-level indicator [HP Director / Utilities (part of
    printer assistant) / view ink level] has ever shown anything but full
    to the top.

    The cartridge light [white-lit drop icon] on the printer front panel,
    which serves for a low ink level in either cartridge properly
    indicated a few times prior to the time I ran out of black ink. I
    have not yet run out of colored ink.

    Since this light serves both cartridges, it cannot tell me which
    cartridge is low on ink. Also, it has lit a number of times when the
    typical HP, non-robust-software has lost its cool.

    The last tech-support type, at Site Code 95, said she was sending me a
    program that would print out text on the 5650 that would tell me how
    full each cartridge was individually. I did not even get her first
    email. When I called back, it then turned out that what she claimed
    to have sent was an email with a link to a public-access diagnostic
    for such purpose on the HP Website. A second email did reach me, but
    the link therein for that purpose was dead, but apparently the
    contents of the linked page was that included in her email below here
    link. It was entitled "HP Deskjet Printers - Printing Internal
    Tests", but it contained NO diagnostic that had anything to do with
    ink levels.

    You take it from there: 1) How can I make the only approximate, but
    color-separating, on-screen indicator work; and/or 2) do you know the
    location of a publiclly available diagnostic routine that prints out
    these levels independently? 3) I'll defer the extraneous panel
    cartridge-light indications to later discussion of reasonable
    bailing-out procedures for when the driver runs amok.

    If you can solve those matters, I'll reward you with tougher meat.

    Ray (w/ sore jaws)
  4. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    I found the URL for the missing document [bud07098] claimed to have a
    text printout routine indicating the levels of ink in each cartridge.
    It is, indeed simply what was reproduced in the tech-support email and
    does not contain any such capability:

    http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?cc=us&lc=en&dlc=en&docname=bud07098

    Ray
  5. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "Raymond A. Chamberlin" <raych@znet.com> wrote in message
    news:rioa909ln3fmjmciktqop1ui24fr2pb6do@4ax.com...

    > Problem: Neither the black nor the color on-screen
    > approximate-ink-level indicator [HP Director / Utilities (part of
    > printer assistant) / view ink level] has ever shown anything but full
    > to the top.
    [snip]
    > You take it from there: 1) How can I make the only approximate, but
    > color-separating, on-screen indicator work; and/or 2) do you know the
    > location of a publiclly available diagnostic routine that prints out
    > these levels independently?

    It sounds like you have a problem with bidirectional communications with the
    printer. First check your cable. Is it an IEEE-1284 cable? If so it will
    have IEEE-1284 printed along the length of the cable. If it is not please
    replace the parallel cable with an IEEE-1284 cable (or use a USB connection).
    Also make sure you have the cable connected directly to the computer, and are
    not running the printer through a scanner port.

    If this fails check the parallel port settings (control panes, system,
    hardware, ports). Make sure the parallel port is functioning, it should be
    configured as an ECP port. You may have to set this in BIOS, perhaps by
    pressing F2 or Delete when booting to get to the BIOS setup menu.

    You might also try accessing the ink level information through the toolbox
    rather than the HP director. See the following:
    http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?lc=en&cc=us&docname=bpd09737&product=304445&dlc=en&lang=en

    Let me know the results and we will take it from there.

    Regards,
    Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
  6. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Bob Headrick answered my above post with the below, but that post of
    his has not shown up here; so, on his OK, I post it here now:

    At 08:25 PM 5/2/04, you wrote:

    "Raymond A. Chamberlin" <raych@znet.com> wrote in message
    news:rioa909ln3fmjmciktqop1ui24fr2pb6do@4ax.com...

    > Problem: Neither the black nor the color on-screen
    > approximate-ink-level indicator [HP Director / Utilities (part of
    > printer assistant) / view ink level] has ever shown anything but full
    > to the top.
    [snip]
    > You take it from there: 1) How can I make the only approximate, but
    > color-separating, on-screen indicator work; and/or 2) do you know the
    > location of a publiclly available diagnostic routine that prints out
    > these levels independently?

    It sounds like you have a problem with bidirectional communications
    with the
    printer. First check your cable. Is it an IEEE-1284 cable? If so it
    will
    have IEEE-1284 printed along the length of the cable. If it is not
    please
    replace the parallel cable with an IEEE-1284 cable (or use a USB
    connection).
    Also make sure you have the cable connected directly to the computer,
    and are
    not running the printer through a scanner port.

    If this fails check the parallel port settings (control panes, system,
    hardware, ports). Make sure the parallel port is functioning, it
    should be
    configured as an ECP port. You may have to set this in BIOS, perhaps
    by
    pressing F2 or Delete when booting to get to the BIOS setup menu.

    You might also try accessing the ink level information through the
    toolbox
    rather than the HP director. See the following:
    http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?lc=en&cc=us&docname=bpd09737&product=304445&dlc=en&lang=en

    Let me know the results and we will take it from there.

    Regards,
    Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
  7. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    And this was Bob's respond to my second problem inquiry:

    From: "Bob Headrick" <bobh@proaxis.com>
    To: "Raymond A. Chamberlin" <raych@znet.com>
    Subject: Re: Help needed with HP5650

    Hi Raymond -

    There are a few of things that can cause the first page to be slower.
    First, if you are selecting "automatic" as the paper type the printer
    will take 5 seconds or so on the first page to scan the paper and
    determine which type it is. Try selecting "plain paper" and see if
    this corrects most of the issue. Second, there is a delay after
    completing a page before the back page is printed to allow the ink to
    dry. You can adjust this delay time in the driver, in the Basics tab,
    then select the Advanced box, then slide the "dry time" slider toward
    the left. You may have to experiment with this; the default is "safe"
    but slower. Third, when selecting two sided printing the printer
    underprints the front side with color to make the black dry faster.

    As for running amok, there is a reason for this and a solution if it
    ever happens again (which it should not with USB). The driver for the
    scanner occasionally checks to see if the scanner lid has been raised.
    If printing is occurring during this time the printer stream will be
    interrupted by the scanner commands, resulting in the garble. Since
    you are now connected via USB you should not have this problem, but if
    you do press the "X" (cancel) button on the printer. This will stop
    printing and flush the rest of the print job.

    As for the power switch, it is much better to leave the printer
    plugged into a live outlet at all times. The printer automatically
    goes into a low power mode when idle, where it only consumes a few
    (<2?) Watts. The printer has an internal clock that keeps track of
    the time since the last print job. Depending on this time the printer
    will do more or less servicing before starting the print job. [This
    could actually be another reason for the longer time to print the
    first page....] This servicing will use some ink, and more if the
    printer thinks it has been a long time since the last print job. By
    removing the power to the printer you force the printer into thinking
    it has been the maximum time since the printer will lose track of the
    time since the last job. Removing the power will result in more ink
    being used in servicing the cartridge.

    As for replying in email rather than the newsgroup, actually you sent
    the original post to me and the newsgroup and I replied the same way
    (to you and the newsgroup). There may be more of a delay in some news
    server along the way so you may not have yet seen the answer in the
    newsgroup.

    I would actually prefer to answer questions in the newsgroup so others
    with the same questions could benefit. Feel free to reply to my post
    in the newsgroup when you see it, re-ask these questions and I will
    answer them there as well.

    Regards,
    Bob Headrick
  8. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Wed, 05 May 2004 15:46:46 -0700, Raymond A. Chamberlin
    <raych@znet.com> wrote:

    >And this was Bob's respond to my second problem inquiry:
    >
    >From: "Bob Headrick" <bobh@proaxis.com>
    >To: "Raymond A. Chamberlin" <raych@znet.com>
    >Subject: Re: Help needed with HP5650
    >
    >Hi Raymond -
    >
    >There are a few of things that can cause the first page to be slower.
    >First, if you are selecting "automatic" as the paper type the printer
    >will take 5 seconds or so on the first page to scan the paper and
    >determine which type it is. Try selecting "plain paper" and see if
    >this corrects most of the issue.

    This response makes me think you didn't observe my wording that my
    differential readings for the actual character-printing and spacing
    times, of the first side with respect to those of the second, as being
    3 to 1, specified the time periods for only actual character printing
    and spacing -- NOT the total times during which the printer does ALL
    necessary print tasks, during the periods from the time each side of a
    sheet is positioned until the time either, in the case of the first
    side, the sheet is first withdrawn for reversal or, in the case of the
    second side, the time the printer ceases all operation on that sheet.
    I did check to see that, of course, the time-period ratio I was
    referring to DID, in fact, remain 3:1, when the printer was set to the
    'Plain Paper' mode as the default one. I didn't check whether the
    time period from the paper print-positioning to the beginning of
    spacing to print the first character, in the case of a first-side
    printing, was shortened by 5 s, but 5 s is small compared to the
    unexplained 16-s difference in the actual print-space times of the two
    sides.

    Do you have any thoughts on the reason for the 3:1 1st-to-2nd-side
    time-period ratio I speak of here. The HP jock. . .er. . .tech
    supporters kept trying to include data-transmission time for the full
    sheet into the per-se print time of the 1st side of each sheet.
    Certainly all the control and character data for the full sheet are
    transmitted before actual spacing and printing of the first side of
    each sheet begins. Something very significant is missing from all
    communications I've had on this quandary.

    >Second, there is a delay after
    >completing a page before the back page is printed to allow the ink to
    >dry. You can adjust this delay time in the driver, in the Basics tab,
    >then select the Advanced box, then slide the "dry time" slider toward
    >the left. You may have to experiment with this; the default is "safe"
    >but slower.

    That (effectively an HP secret) is quite interesting to know, but that
    is quite irrelevant to the time ratio I have tried to explicate above.

    >Third, when selecting two sided printing the printer
    >underprints the front side with color to make the black dry faster.

    Hah! I'll bet that's a REAL HP secret. . .designed to make the
    non-cartridge-refilling customer buy more cartridges. What range of
    HP printers do this, the 5600 series, the full 5000 group, or even the
    earlier ones that use the 45 and 78 cartridges?

    >As for running amok, there is a reason for this and a solution if it
    >ever happens again (which it should not with USB). The driver for the
    >scanner occasionally checks to see if the scanner lid has been raised.
    >If printing is occurring during this time the printer stream will be
    >interrupted by the scanner commands, resulting in the garble.

    Are you saying that you really KNOW that this happens with the Mustek
    1200 III EP? I don't see why the scanner itself couldn't just
    interrupt my computer whenever its lid is raised. In fact, I never
    could scan, using this scanner's lid-lift window directly anyhow
    (except for OCR with the version of Textbridge that came with it. A
    later, better version of Textbridge wasn't even supposed to be
    compatible with this lid-open starting method.)

    >Since
    >you are now connected via USB you should not have this problem, but if
    >you do press the "X" (cancel) button on the printer. This will stop
    >printing and flush the rest of the print job.

    Good. Not surprisingly in retrospect, it didn't do that with my
    previous parallel lash-up.

    >As for the power switch, it is much better to leave the printer
    >plugged into a live outlet at all times. The printer automatically
    >goes into a low power mode when idle, where it only consumes a few
    >(<2?) Watts. The printer has an internal clock that keeps track of
    >the time since the last print job. Depending on this time the printer
    >will do more or less servicing before starting the print job.

    If that's really true for the 5650, that's another undivulged bit of
    knowledge nowhere documented for the general public. Are you sure
    that applies to the 5650?

    >[This
    >could actually be another reason for the longer time to print the
    >first page....]

    I don't follow the logic of that at all -- certainly that can't relate
    to the time-period ratio I specify above.

    >This servicing will use some ink, and more if the
    >printer thinks it has been a long time since the last print job. By
    >removing the power to the printer you force the printer into thinking
    >it has been the maximum time since the printer will lose track of the
    >time since the last job. Removing the power will result in more ink
    >being used in servicing the cartridge.

    If that's all really applicable to this printer, I guess it's somewhat
    useful, but I don't want to leave any unnecessarily electrical stuff
    activated when asleep or away from my house.

    >As for replying in email rather than the newsgroup, actually you sent
    >the original post to me and the newsgroup and I replied the same way
    >(to you and the newsgroup). There may be more of a delay in some news
    >server along the way so you may not have yet seen the answer in the
    >newsgroup.

    Well, days later, this post of yours has not shown up; so you can see
    what I did with it in the previous part of this thread.

    >I would actually prefer to answer questions in the newsgroup so others
    >with the same questions could benefit. Feel free to reply to my post
    >in the newsgroup when you see it, re-ask these questions and I will
    >answer them there as well.

    As you can see, this action is not needed from you at this point.

    Ray

    >Regards,
    >Bob Headrick
  9. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "Raymond A. Chamberlin" <raych@znet.com> wrote in message
    news:ug0j90d9pj2bg6ks2b3ilch74tna27abap@4ax.com...>

    > >As for running amok, there is a reason for this and a solution if it
    > >ever happens again (which it should not with USB). The driver for the
    > >scanner occasionally checks to see if the scanner lid has been raised.
    > >If printing is occurring during this time the printer stream will be
    > >interrupted by the scanner commands, resulting in the garble.
    >
    > Are you saying that you really KNOW that this happens with the Mustek
    > 1200 III EP? I don't see why the scanner itself couldn't just
    > interrupt my computer whenever its lid is raised.

    What it could do and what it does may be different things. I know for a fact
    this scanner shared on a parallel port has issues with a pass through pritner
    unless the automatic lid-checking for the scanner is disabled. The scanner
    driver polls the scanner, and when it does this it causes communication issues
    if it happens while printing. You can see
    http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?lc=en&cc=us&docname=bpu02044
    or the ending paragraph of
    http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?lc=en&cc=us&docname=bpy20086
    for some discussion.

    > >Since
    > >you are now connected via USB you should not have this problem, but if
    > >you do press the "X" (cancel) button on the printer. This will stop
    > >printing and flush the rest of the print job.
    >
    > Good. Not surprisingly in retrospect, it didn't do that with my
    > previous parallel lash-up.

    The cancel button works independent of the connection method. Once the cancel
    button is pressed the pritner will not print the rest of the print job, it will
    simply send it to the "bit bucket". It may take some time to clear since the
    remainder of the print job will still be sent to the printer.

    > >As for the power switch, it is much better to leave the printer
    > >plugged into a live outlet at all times. The printer automatically
    > >goes into a low power mode when idle, where it only consumes a few
    > >(<2?) Watts. The printer has an internal clock that keeps track of
    > >the time since the last print job. Depending on this time the printer
    > >will do more or less servicing before starting the print job.
    >
    > If that's really true for the 5650, that's another undivulged bit of
    > knowledge nowhere documented for the general public. Are you sure
    > that applies to the 5650?

    The Deskjet 5650 manual says "Caution! Always use the Power button to turn the
    printer on and off. Using a power strip, surge protector, or a wall mounted
    switch to turn the print on and off may cause printer failure." Translation -
    please leave the printner plugged into a live outlet.

    > >This servicing will use some ink, and more if the
    > >printer thinks it has been a long time since the last print job. By
    > >removing the power to the printer you force the printer into thinking
    > >it has been the maximum time since the printer will lose track of the
    > >time since the last job. Removing the power will result in more ink
    > >being used in servicing the cartridge.
    >
    > If that's all really applicable to this printer, I guess it's somewhat
    > useful, but I don't want to leave any unnecessarily electrical stuff
    > activated when asleep or away from my house.

    Do you also unplug your television, lamps, etc? The printer is designed to
    remain plugged into a live outlet and for best results you should follow the
    manual.

    - Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
  10. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    I don't get it; you didn't respond to what has been my main issue all
    along, the fact that the 5650, in automatic two-sided printing, takes
    3 times as long, in Fast Normal at least, to print the first sides of
    sheets as it does to print the second sides -- "print" referring to
    only the actual time for character impression and spacing. My switch
    to a USB computer connection did not change this. All my other issues
    and comments have been of much lesser concern, including the ink-level
    one. Do you not have any further comment on this strange phenomenon
    reviewed in my post of 5 May, 6:15 pm, in its first 3 paragraphs (plus
    my later expressed perplexity from your comment suggesting that this
    slower first-side printing could relate to the printer's time-out to
    low-power status)?

    (On the lesser issues and comments, I interleave more comments below,
    but the above is what I have been trying forever now to squeeze out of
    HP or whomever is knowledgeable on it.)

    On Fri, 7 May 2004 20:17:01 -0700, "Bob Headrick" <bobh@proaxis.com>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Raymond A. Chamberlin" <raych@znet.com> wrote in message
    >news:ug0j90d9pj2bg6ks2b3ilch74tna27abap@4ax.com...>
    >
    >> >As for running amok, there is a reason for this and a solution if it
    >> >ever happens again (which it should not with USB). The driver for the
    >> >scanner occasionally checks to see if the scanner lid has been raised.
    >> >If printing is occurring during this time the printer stream will be
    >> >interrupted by the scanner commands, resulting in the garble.
    >>
    >> Are you saying that you really KNOW that this happens with the Mustek
    >> 1200 III EP? I don't see why the scanner itself couldn't just
    >> interrupt my computer whenever its lid is raised.
    >
    >What it could do and what it does may be different things. I know for a fact
    >this scanner shared on a parallel port has issues with a pass through pritner
    >unless the automatic lid-checking for the scanner is disabled. The scanner
    >driver polls the scanner, and when it does this it causes communication issues
    >if it happens while printing. You can see
    >http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?lc=en&cc=us&docname=bpu02044
    >or the ending paragraph of
    >http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?lc=en&cc=us&docname=bpy20086
    >for some discussion.
    >
    >> >Since
    >> >you are now connected via USB you should not have this problem, but if
    >> >you do press the "X" (cancel) button on the printer. This will stop
    >> >printing and flush the rest of the print job.
    >>
    >> Good. Not surprisingly in retrospect, it didn't do that with my
    >> previous parallel lash-up.
    >
    >The cancel button works independent of the connection method. Once the cancel
    >button is pressed the pritner will not print the rest of the print job, it will
    >simply send it to the "bit bucket". It may take some time to clear since the
    >remainder of the print job will still be sent to the printer.
    >
    >> >As for the power switch, it is much better to leave the printer
    >> >plugged into a live outlet at all times. The printer automatically
    >> >goes into a low power mode when idle, where it only consumes a few
    >> >(<2?) Watts. The printer has an internal clock that keeps track of
    >> >the time since the last print job. Depending on this time the printer
    >> >will do more or less servicing before starting the print job.
    >>
    >> If that's really true for the 5650, that's another undivulged bit of
    >> knowledge nowhere documented for the general public. Are you sure
    >> that applies to the 5650?
    >
    >The Deskjet 5650 manual says "Caution! Always use the Power button to turn the
    >printer on and off. Using a power strip, surge protector, or a wall mounted
    >switch to turn the print on and off may cause printer failure." Translation -
    >please leave the printner plugged into a live outlet.

    OK, I see that that is true; I hadn't found that to date. However,
    what you are now adding to this -- that the printer should not ever
    even be turned off at all: where in the manual or in any other
    expression by HP to the public should one find this instruction? It's
    NOT in the manual. The only reference to low-power mode there is in
    the description of the "auto-off" option, and nothing is said there
    about keeping track of the time since the last print job or of
    servicing anything before starting a new print job..

    >
    >> >This servicing will use some ink, and more if the
    >> >printer thinks it has been a long time since the last print job. By
    >> >removing the power to the printer you force the printer into thinking
    >> >it has been the maximum time since the printer will lose track of the
    >> >time since the last job. Removing the power will result in more ink
    >> >being used in servicing the cartridge.
    >>
    >> If that's all really applicable to this printer, I guess it's somewhat
    >> useful, but I don't want to leave any unnecessarily electrical stuff
    >> activated when asleep or away from my house.
    >
    >Do you also unplug your television,

    No, that would efeat the use of a remote in turning it on.

    >lamps,

    Lamp switches have a good-size gap of air when open and I don't think
    conductive insects can get in them very easily. (Bugs from HP
    software can never get there.)

    >etc?

    I also leave my refrigerator, electric clocks and doorbell transformer
    on -- for well-considered reasons.

    >The printer is designed to
    >remain plugged into a live outlet and for best results you should follow the
    >manual.

    I AM accepting what's in the manual. What you add, of course, isn't
    unreasonable IF the 5650 really does all you say, despite HP's secrecy
    about it; but considering all the questionable behavior of HP's
    printers, I'm not excited about leaving one of such free, on its own
    recognizance, while I'm in Timbuctu.

    A couple of other lesser concerns I have are:

    1. Apparently, the screen flags signaling paper out, paper jam and
    whatever else, which were active with my 932c printer have been
    removed from the 5650 driver. I have to look at the down-arrow
    indicator on the printer and check out what the problem is. No big
    deal, but less convenient.

    2. The 5650 uses the same dysfunctional print-status window that the
    932c used. An HP tech-support person told me that window is a Windows
    window and blamed its problems (current page number is usually much
    greater than the total page count and there are at least two
    independent sets of pause and purge settings and the cancel function
    only works under some very odd set of conditions. If this software is
    MS's stuff and is known, as this HP person stated, why doesn't HP opt
    not to use it in their driver and opt to desing their its OWN status
    window?

    I can live with this nonsense. Of course, I can live with the
    3-times-slower first-sheet-side Fast Normal print time also; but it
    really bugs me that HP people can't give me a coherent reason for this
    anomaly. They can't even seem to agree whether it's normal behavior
    for a 5650 or not. If this model were marketed for commercial use,
    certainly this matter would be documented in black and white somewhere
    where the end user could read it and rely upon what is said there.

    Ray

    >- Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
    >
    >
    >
    >
  11. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "Raymond A. Chamberlin" <raych@znet.com> wrote in message
    news:8n1p90h7l0ar40k82jjeic3ktkqjhag3d7@4ax.com...

    > >The Deskjet 5650 manual says "Caution! Always use the Power button to turn
    the
    > >printer on and off. Using a power strip, surge protector, or a wall mounted
    > >switch to turn the print on and off may cause printer failure."
    Translation -
    > >please leave the printner plugged into a live outlet.
    >
    > OK, I see that that is true; I hadn't found that to date. However,
    > what you are now adding to this -- that the printer should not ever
    > even be turned off at all: where in the manual or in any other
    > expression by HP to the public should one find this instruction? It's
    > NOT in the manual.

    I am not suggesting that the printer needs to be left on all the time. As the
    manual says the printer should only be turned off by the printer's power button
    and the pritner should be left connected to a live outlet. I am only
    suggesting that you follow the manual, and have (previously) indicated some
    additional information as to why the manual says what it does.

    I am afraid that I cannot help you any further.

    - Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP


    > A couple of other lesser concerns I have are:
    >
    > 1. Apparently, the screen flags signaling paper out, paper jam and
    > whatever else, which were active with my 932c printer have been
    > removed from the 5650 driver. I have to look at the down-arrow
    > indicator on the printer and check out what the problem is. No big
    > deal, but less convenient.


    >
    > 2. The 5650 uses the same dysfunctional print-status window that the
    > 932c used. An HP tech-support person told me that window is a Windows
    > window and blamed its problems (current page number is usually much
    > greater than the total page count and there are at least two
    > independent sets of pause and purge settings and the cancel function
    > only works under some very odd set of conditions. If this software is
    > MS's stuff and is known, as this HP person stated, why doesn't HP opt
    > not to use it in their driver and opt to desing their its OWN status
    > window?
    >
    > I can live with this nonsense. Of course, I can live with the
    > 3-times-slower first-sheet-side Fast Normal print time also; but it
    > really bugs me that HP people can't give me a coherent reason for this
    > anomaly. They can't even seem to agree whether it's normal behavior
    > for a 5650 or not. If this model were marketed for commercial use,
    > certainly this matter would be documented in black and white somewhere
    > where the end user could read it and rely upon what is said there.
    >
    > Ray
    >
    > >- Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    >
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