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Hidden partition in new hdd install

Tags:
  • Partition
  • Hard Drives
  • System Restore
  • Windows 7
Last response: in Windows 7
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October 29, 2009 7:03:57 AM

If you install win7 on a new hdd, I understand it will create a 100MB hidden partition to hold critical system files. What exactly is its purpose, compared to say, System Restore?

More about : hidden partition hdd install

October 29, 2009 7:27:02 AM

drive partitions and file structure information to the best of my knowledge, kinda a middle ground between bios and the os

system restore takes up immensely more space and is used to bring your computer back to a previous state including all data and software
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a b $ Windows 7
October 29, 2009 7:32:32 AM

The hidden partition holds the Windows Recovery Environment to assist you when things go wrong. If you are confident that things won't go wrong, and it's taking up a significant proportion of your hard disk then you can avoid it during installation. But if one or two hundred MB is a significant proportion of your hard disk I would suggest that you need a bigger drive.
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October 29, 2009 7:45:00 AM

No, I'm ok w/ the disk space. I'm just curious what it brings over System Restore. I have used System Restore successfully in the past to revive xp after installing an erratic driver or app. Plus I image my boot partition regularly.
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a b $ Windows 7
October 29, 2009 8:34:50 AM

It's mainly for when you can't even boot into Windows to use System Restore. If your image software will work by itself, without having to go into Windows, it's probably an acceptable substitute. But, as with any backup regime, you would be wise to test it before you have to use it in earnest. There are valid reasons, other than space, why you might not want another partition, but if this doesn't pertain I would be inclined to leave it.
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a b $ Windows 7
October 30, 2009 3:54:06 AM

I always format right so I dont get the extra partition.
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