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How to back-up hard drive

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June 9, 2004 5:44:21 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

I bought an external usb-firewire hard drive 120G.
I want to use it to back up my C drive.
What do I do now? I don't see a "back up your hard drive"
choice anywhere! I have XP Home.
Clueless as usual.

More about : back hard drive

Anonymous
June 9, 2004 9:31:01 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Tim,

Microsoft removed the Backup Utility in the Home Edition. However the
utility is on your XP Home CD. Insert the XP CD, and look for file
NTBACKUP.MSI from the folder D:\Valueadd\msft\ntbackup. This will launch the
Windows Backup Utility Installation Wizard.

Tip-right click and copy the file NTBACKUP.MSI onto your C: drive and then
create a shortcut to your desktop. Then you can drag the shortcut into your
'Start' menu.


"Tim" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:1a3a901c44dfd$f56f4030$a001280a@phx.gbl...
> I bought an external usb-firewire hard drive 120G.
> I want to use it to back up my C drive.
> What do I do now? I don't see a "back up your hard drive"
> choice anywhere! I have XP Home.
> Clueless as usual.
June 9, 2004 4:55:02 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"Tim" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:1a3a901c44dfd$f56f4030$a001280a@phx.gbl...
> I bought an external usb-firewire hard drive 120G.
> I want to use it to back up my C drive.
> What do I do now? I don't see a "back up your hard drive"
> choice anywhere! I have XP Home.
> Clueless as usual.

You have definitely started down the right road to " Backup Heaven" to help
you to complete the journey and to make it as painless as possible IMHO you
will need to purchase some third party software to image, copy or ghost
your HDD in it's entirety. My own choice was Power Quest Drive Image 7 with
which I am quite content. Once set up all I have to do is to remember to
switch on my external drive at the appropriate time to receive the scheduled
backups.These take place quietly in the background with just a small impact
on performance while the process is running.

Richard.
Related resources
Anonymous
June 9, 2004 5:02:13 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"Tim" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:1a3a901c44dfd$f56f4030$a001280a@phx.gbl...
> I bought an external usb-firewire hard drive 120G.
> I want to use it to back up my C drive.
> What do I do now? I don't see a "back up your hard drive"
> choice anywhere! I have XP Home.
> Clueless as usual.

Tim:

You might consider using Symantec's Norton Ghost program (2003 version) to
clone your internal hard drive to your USB external hard drive.



The advantage of this process is that for all practical purposes you're
making an exact duplicate of your working internal drive. Everything is
"backed up" - your operating system, registry, programs & applications,
configuration settings, your data files - everything. Unlike virtually every
other so-called "backup program" that merely backs up your data files, i.e.,
the files you have created in your various programs.



The cloning process is relatively simple. Other than the external hard drive
you'll be cloning to, disconnect any other external storage device(s), e.g.,
ZIP drive, flash drive, etc., from the computer and boot up with the Ghost
floppy disk (see below instructions for preparing the Ghost floppy) and use
the screen displays to select the source (internal hard drive) disk and the
destination (external hard drive) disk.



With a reasonably fast processor, your cloning speed (data transfer) should
be about 400 to 500 MB/min. Should you be using a USB 1.0/1.1 connection,
your cloning speed will be about 40 to 50 MB/min.



Note that in some cases, connecting the USB external hard drive to a USB hub
prevents the cloning process. In those situations, the external drive should
bypass the hub and be directly connected to the computer's USB port.



Another major advantage of this cloning process is that you can also perform
the cloning operation in reverse, i.e., from the external hard drive to the
internal one, thus creating a bootable internal drive. Naturally in this
situation during the cloning process the external hard drive becomes the
source disk and the internal hard drive the destination disk. BTW, the
cloned USB external hard drive will not be bootable - at least in my
experience with XP. I have read many comments in the various newsgroups and
websites to the effect that an external USB hard drive is bootable as long
as it's supported by the motherboard's BIOS. But I've yet to achieve this.
If anyone has successfully booted (in XP) with a USB external hard drive, I
would be anxious to hear of their experience in this area.



I prefer to carry out the cloning operation using a Ghost floppy disk,
rather than using Ghost's Windows interface. I find this process simple,
straightforward, and effective.



PREPARING THE GHOST FLOPPY DISK



1. Insert a blank floppy disk. It need not be formatted.

2. Access your Ghost program. Make sure you have the latest version 2003.793
(as of 6/04). Use Symantec's built-in LiveUpdate feature to install the
latest version in the event you're using an earlier version.

3. Click on Ghost Utilities and select Norton Ghost Boot Wizard.

4. Select Standard Ghost Boot Disk. On the following dialog box (assuming
you have USB 2.0 capability), select "USB 2.0 Support" and check "Assign DOS
drive letters". Click Next.

5. Select the "Use PC-DOS" option in the next dialog box.

6. Complete the process following the screen prompts.

7. Remove floppy and label accordingly.



With the USB external hard drive connected, boot up with the Ghost floppy
and perform the cloning operation. You should be able to easily perform this
operation by stepping through Ghost's informative dialog boxes. Just keep in
mind that the source disk is your internal hard drive and the destination
disk is your USB external hard drive. Also remember to disconnect any other
storage devices you may have connected to your computer (ZIP drives,
flash/jump drives, etc.) before you begin the cloning operation.



Art
Anonymous
June 10, 2004 11:53:11 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

On Wed, 9 Jun 2004 13:02:13 -0400, "Art" <notaname@notanisp> wrote:

>
>"Tim" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
>news:1a3a901c44dfd$f56f4030$a001280a@phx.gbl...
>> I bought an external usb-firewire hard drive 120G.
>> I want to use it to back up my C drive.
>> What do I do now? I don't see a "back up your hard drive"
>> choice anywhere! I have XP Home.
>> Clueless as usual.
>
>Tim:
>
>You might consider using Symantec's Norton Ghost program (2003 version) to
>clone your internal hard drive to your USB external hard drive.
>
>
>
>The advantage of this process is that for all practical purposes you're
>making an exact duplicate of your working internal drive. Everything is
>"backed up" - your operating system, registry, programs & applications,
>configuration settings, your data files - everything. Unlike virtually every
>other so-called "backup program" that merely backs up your data files, i.e.,
>the files you have created in your various programs.
>
>
>
>The cloning process is relatively simple. Other than the external hard drive
>you'll be cloning to, disconnect any other external storage device(s), e.g.,
>ZIP drive, flash drive, etc., from the computer and boot up with the Ghost
>floppy disk (see below instructions for preparing the Ghost floppy) and use
>the screen displays to select the source (internal hard drive) disk and the
>destination (external hard drive) disk.
>
>
>
>With a reasonably fast processor, your cloning speed (data transfer) should
>be about 400 to 500 MB/min. Should you be using a USB 1.0/1.1 connection,
>your cloning speed will be about 40 to 50 MB/min.
>
>
>
>Note that in some cases, connecting the USB external hard drive to a USB hub
>prevents the cloning process. In those situations, the external drive should
>bypass the hub and be directly connected to the computer's USB port.
>
>
>
>Another major advantage of this cloning process is that you can also perform
>the cloning operation in reverse, i.e., from the external hard drive to the
>internal one, thus creating a bootable internal drive. Naturally in this
>situation during the cloning process the external hard drive becomes the
>source disk and the internal hard drive the destination disk. BTW, the
>cloned USB external hard drive will not be bootable - at least in my
>experience with XP. I have read many comments in the various newsgroups and
>websites to the effect that an external USB hard drive is bootable as long
>as it's supported by the motherboard's BIOS. But I've yet to achieve this.
>If anyone has successfully booted (in XP) with a USB external hard drive, I
>would be anxious to hear of their experience in this area.
>
>
>
>I prefer to carry out the cloning operation using a Ghost floppy disk,
>rather than using Ghost's Windows interface. I find this process simple,
>straightforward, and effective.
>
>
>
>PREPARING THE GHOST FLOPPY DISK
>
>
>
>1. Insert a blank floppy disk. It need not be formatted.
>
>2. Access your Ghost program. Make sure you have the latest version 2003.793
>(as of 6/04). Use Symantec's built-in LiveUpdate feature to install the
>latest version in the event you're using an earlier version.
>
>3. Click on Ghost Utilities and select Norton Ghost Boot Wizard.
>
>4. Select Standard Ghost Boot Disk. On the following dialog box (assuming
>you have USB 2.0 capability), select "USB 2.0 Support" and check "Assign DOS
>drive letters". Click Next.
>
>5. Select the "Use PC-DOS" option in the next dialog box.
>
>6. Complete the process following the screen prompts.
>
>7. Remove floppy and label accordingly.
>
>
>
>With the USB external hard drive connected, boot up with the Ghost floppy
>and perform the cloning operation. You should be able to easily perform this
>operation by stepping through Ghost's informative dialog boxes. Just keep in
>mind that the source disk is your internal hard drive and the destination
>disk is your USB external hard drive. Also remember to disconnect any other
>storage devices you may have connected to your computer (ZIP drives,
>flash/jump drives, etc.) before you begin the cloning operation.
>
>
>
>Art


I also have been reading about "TrueImage" and "DriveImage"
for backup. From what I can gather, they will also do a "mirror
image" backup, but do everthing in Windows.

I do know that Ghost works because I have used it (from Dos)
In order to do the clone in XP, requires the computer to boot
from a floppy / or CD and execute in PC-dos.

The advantage I see with "TrueImage" is that when creating
an "image" backup, you can back up a few days later and
do an incremental backup of only files that have changed or
are new.

Anyone have any personal experience with either "driveImage"
or "TrueImage"???

Thanks.
Anonymous
June 12, 2004 3:55:05 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Yes... we have been doing some extensive testing of True Image Please
thread in microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics True Image 7.0 - hpgs2wns.dll
Error/Virtual Drive/Restore Question. The title is a little misleading.

It is a hard choice! Drive Image 7 appears to be having a number
challenges. CNET approval is only 25% and the latest PC Magazine review
only gave it 3 out of 5. Ghost 2003 has a CNET approval rating of 52%, but
has moved past Drive Image in the latest PC Magazine review with a rating of
4 out of 5. One concern in reading the reviews was the number of people
having trouble getting it to work with externals. Acronis True Image has a
CNET approval of 65% and was one of
the only to receive CNET editors choice. The only negative we found at this
point is that it does not check the disk while restoring the image The
latest issue of PC Magazine rated it 5 out of 5 and gave it PC magazines
editors choice. You can get a 15 day trial version.

http://www.acronis.com/download/


"not_over_the_hill" <watch_the_moneyNOSPAM@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:9qehc0tf96e985v1jhkr6c7mtp032stmt3@4ax.com...
> On Wed, 9 Jun 2004 13:02:13 -0400, "Art" <notaname@notanisp> wrote:
>
> >
> >"Tim" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> >news:1a3a901c44dfd$f56f4030$a001280a@phx.gbl...
> >> I bought an external usb-firewire hard drive 120G.
> >> I want to use it to back up my C drive.
> >> What do I do now? I don't see a "back up your hard drive"
> >> choice anywhere! I have XP Home.
> >> Clueless as usual.
> >
> >Tim:
> >
> >You might consider using Symantec's Norton Ghost program (2003 version)
to
> >clone your internal hard drive to your USB external hard drive.
> >
> >
> >
> >The advantage of this process is that for all practical purposes you're
> >making an exact duplicate of your working internal drive. Everything is
> >"backed up" - your operating system, registry, programs & applications,
> >configuration settings, your data files - everything. Unlike virtually
every
> >other so-called "backup program" that merely backs up your data files,
i.e.,
> >the files you have created in your various programs.
> >
> >
> >
> >The cloning process is relatively simple. Other than the external hard
drive
> >you'll be cloning to, disconnect any other external storage device(s),
e.g.,
> >ZIP drive, flash drive, etc., from the computer and boot up with the
Ghost
> >floppy disk (see below instructions for preparing the Ghost floppy) and
use
> >the screen displays to select the source (internal hard drive) disk and
the
> >destination (external hard drive) disk.
> >
> >
> >
> >With a reasonably fast processor, your cloning speed (data transfer)
should
> >be about 400 to 500 MB/min. Should you be using a USB 1.0/1.1 connection,
> >your cloning speed will be about 40 to 50 MB/min.
> >
> >
> >
> >Note that in some cases, connecting the USB external hard drive to a USB
hub
> >prevents the cloning process. In those situations, the external drive
should
> >bypass the hub and be directly connected to the computer's USB port.
> >
> >
> >
> >Another major advantage of this cloning process is that you can also
perform
> >the cloning operation in reverse, i.e., from the external hard drive to
the
> >internal one, thus creating a bootable internal drive. Naturally in this
> >situation during the cloning process the external hard drive becomes the
> >source disk and the internal hard drive the destination disk. BTW, the
> >cloned USB external hard drive will not be bootable - at least in my
> >experience with XP. I have read many comments in the various newsgroups
and
> >websites to the effect that an external USB hard drive is bootable as
long
> >as it's supported by the motherboard's BIOS. But I've yet to achieve
this.
> >If anyone has successfully booted (in XP) with a USB external hard drive,
I
> >would be anxious to hear of their experience in this area.
> >
> >
> >
> >I prefer to carry out the cloning operation using a Ghost floppy disk,
> >rather than using Ghost's Windows interface. I find this process simple,
> >straightforward, and effective.
> >
> >
> >
> >PREPARING THE GHOST FLOPPY DISK
> >
> >
> >
> >1. Insert a blank floppy disk. It need not be formatted.
> >
> >2. Access your Ghost program. Make sure you have the latest version
2003.793
> >(as of 6/04). Use Symantec's built-in LiveUpdate feature to install the
> >latest version in the event you're using an earlier version.
> >
> >3. Click on Ghost Utilities and select Norton Ghost Boot Wizard.
> >
> >4. Select Standard Ghost Boot Disk. On the following dialog box (assuming
> >you have USB 2.0 capability), select "USB 2.0 Support" and check "Assign
DOS
> >drive letters". Click Next.
> >
> >5. Select the "Use PC-DOS" option in the next dialog box.
> >
> >6. Complete the process following the screen prompts.
> >
> >7. Remove floppy and label accordingly.
> >
> >
> >
> >With the USB external hard drive connected, boot up with the Ghost floppy
> >and perform the cloning operation. You should be able to easily perform
this
> >operation by stepping through Ghost's informative dialog boxes. Just keep
in
> >mind that the source disk is your internal hard drive and the destination
> >disk is your USB external hard drive. Also remember to disconnect any
other
> >storage devices you may have connected to your computer (ZIP drives,
> >flash/jump drives, etc.) before you begin the cloning operation.
> >
> >
> >
> >Art
>
>
> I also have been reading about "TrueImage" and "DriveImage"
> for backup. From what I can gather, they will also do a "mirror
> image" backup, but do everthing in Windows.
>
> I do know that Ghost works because I have used it (from Dos)
> In order to do the clone in XP, requires the computer to boot
> from a floppy / or CD and execute in PC-dos.
>
> The advantage I see with "TrueImage" is that when creating
> an "image" backup, you can back up a few days later and
> do an incremental backup of only files that have changed or
> are new.
>
> Anyone have any personal experience with either "driveImage"
> or "TrueImage"???
>
> Thanks.
>
>
Anonymous
June 12, 2004 8:40:52 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Been playing around with TrueImage and it seems OK.

I used bothe TI and DriveImage and so far, I like
TrueImage a little better. Hard to know what
Symantec is going to do re: Ghost and DI.
Don't know which will survive, but I really
don't like the fact that it (Ghost) doesn't seem to work
well with ext. HD's. I know it's supposed to,
but I couldn't get Ghost 2003 to work.

Could be me.




On Fri, 11 Jun 2004 23:55:05 GMT, "InfoQuest"
<InfoQuest@worldnet.att.net> wrote:

>Yes... we have been doing some extensive testing of True Image Please
>thread in microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics True Image 7.0 - hpgs2wns.dll
>Error/Virtual Drive/Restore Question. The title is a little misleading.
>
> It is a hard choice! Drive Image 7 appears to be having a number
>challenges. CNET approval is only 25% and the latest PC Magazine review
>only gave it 3 out of 5. Ghost 2003 has a CNET approval rating of 52%, but
>has moved past Drive Image in the latest PC Magazine review with a rating of
>4 out of 5. One concern in reading the reviews was the number of people
>having trouble getting it to work with externals. Acronis True Image has a
>CNET approval of 65% and was one of
>the only to receive CNET editors choice. The only negative we found at this
>point is that it does not check the disk while restoring the image The
>latest issue of PC Magazine rated it 5 out of 5 and gave it PC magazines
>editors choice. You can get a 15 day trial version.
>
>http://www.acronis.com/download/
>
>
>"not_over_the_hill" <watch_the_moneyNOSPAM@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>news:9qehc0tf96e985v1jhkr6c7mtp032stmt3@4ax.com...
>> On Wed, 9 Jun 2004 13:02:13 -0400, "Art" <notaname@notanisp> wrote:
>>
>> >
>> >"Tim" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
>> >news:1a3a901c44dfd$f56f4030$a001280a@phx.gbl...
>> >> I bought an external usb-firewire hard drive 120G.
>> >> I want to use it to back up my C drive.
>> >> What do I do now? I don't see a "back up your hard drive"
>> >> choice anywhere! I have XP Home.
>> >> Clueless as usual.
>> >
>> >Tim:
>> >
>> >You might consider using Symantec's Norton Ghost program (2003 version)
>to
>> >clone your internal hard drive to your USB external hard drive.
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >The advantage of this process is that for all practical purposes you're
>> >making an exact duplicate of your working internal drive. Everything is
>> >"backed up" - your operating system, registry, programs & applications,
>> >configuration settings, your data files - everything. Unlike virtually
>every
>> >other so-called "backup program" that merely backs up your data files,
>i.e.,
>> >the files you have created in your various programs.
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >The cloning process is relatively simple. Other than the external hard
>drive
>> >you'll be cloning to, disconnect any other external storage device(s),
>e.g.,
>> >ZIP drive, flash drive, etc., from the computer and boot up with the
>Ghost
>> >floppy disk (see below instructions for preparing the Ghost floppy) and
>use
>> >the screen displays to select the source (internal hard drive) disk and
>the
>> >destination (external hard drive) disk.
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >With a reasonably fast processor, your cloning speed (data transfer)
>should
>> >be about 400 to 500 MB/min. Should you be using a USB 1.0/1.1 connection,
>> >your cloning speed will be about 40 to 50 MB/min.
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >Note that in some cases, connecting the USB external hard drive to a USB
>hub
>> >prevents the cloning process. In those situations, the external drive
>should
>> >bypass the hub and be directly connected to the computer's USB port.
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >Another major advantage of this cloning process is that you can also
>perform
>> >the cloning operation in reverse, i.e., from the external hard drive to
>the
>> >internal one, thus creating a bootable internal drive. Naturally in this
>> >situation during the cloning process the external hard drive becomes the
>> >source disk and the internal hard drive the destination disk. BTW, the
>> >cloned USB external hard drive will not be bootable - at least in my
>> >experience with XP. I have read many comments in the various newsgroups
>and
>> >websites to the effect that an external USB hard drive is bootable as
>long
>> >as it's supported by the motherboard's BIOS. But I've yet to achieve
>this.
>> >If anyone has successfully booted (in XP) with a USB external hard drive,
>I
>> >would be anxious to hear of their experience in this area.
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >I prefer to carry out the cloning operation using a Ghost floppy disk,
>> >rather than using Ghost's Windows interface. I find this process simple,
>> >straightforward, and effective.
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >PREPARING THE GHOST FLOPPY DISK
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >1. Insert a blank floppy disk. It need not be formatted.
>> >
>> >2. Access your Ghost program. Make sure you have the latest version
>2003.793
>> >(as of 6/04). Use Symantec's built-in LiveUpdate feature to install the
>> >latest version in the event you're using an earlier version.
>> >
>> >3. Click on Ghost Utilities and select Norton Ghost Boot Wizard.
>> >
>> >4. Select Standard Ghost Boot Disk. On the following dialog box (assuming
>> >you have USB 2.0 capability), select "USB 2.0 Support" and check "Assign
>DOS
>> >drive letters". Click Next.
>> >
>> >5. Select the "Use PC-DOS" option in the next dialog box.
>> >
>> >6. Complete the process following the screen prompts.
>> >
>> >7. Remove floppy and label accordingly.
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >With the USB external hard drive connected, boot up with the Ghost floppy
>> >and perform the cloning operation. You should be able to easily perform
>this
>> >operation by stepping through Ghost's informative dialog boxes. Just keep
>in
>> >mind that the source disk is your internal hard drive and the destination
>> >disk is your USB external hard drive. Also remember to disconnect any
>other
>> >storage devices you may have connected to your computer (ZIP drives,
>> >flash/jump drives, etc.) before you begin the cloning operation.
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >Art
>>
>>
>> I also have been reading about "TrueImage" and "DriveImage"
>> for backup. From what I can gather, they will also do a "mirror
>> image" backup, but do everthing in Windows.
>>
>> I do know that Ghost works because I have used it (from Dos)
>> In order to do the clone in XP, requires the computer to boot
>> from a floppy / or CD and execute in PC-dos.
>>
>> The advantage I see with "TrueImage" is that when creating
>> an "image" backup, you can back up a few days later and
>> do an incremental backup of only files that have changed or
>> are new.
>>
>> Anyone have any personal experience with either "driveImage"
>> or "TrueImage"???
>>
>> Thanks.
>>
>>
>
Anonymous
June 12, 2004 2:02:16 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

In my experience, Ghost 2003 works just fine cloning your internal hard
drive to an external USB hard drive. I've cloned to external USB hard drives
dozens of times, using a variety of external USB hard drives without any
problem whatsoever. As I indicated in my original posting, make sure you're
using the latest version of Ghost 2003, i.e., Ghost 2003.793. Use Symantec's
LiveUpdate feature to download the latest version.

Art


"not_over_the_hill" <watch_the_moneyNOSPAM@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:062lc053fdq04vavgmpticsijnsjsk81ol@4ax.com...
> Been playing around with TrueImage and it seems OK.
>
> I used bothe TI and DriveImage and so far, I like
> TrueImage a little better. Hard to know what
> Symantec is going to do re: Ghost and DI.
> Don't know which will survive, but I really
> don't like the fact that it (Ghost) doesn't seem to work
> well with ext. HD's. I know it's supposed to,
> but I couldn't get Ghost 2003 to work.
>
> Could be me.
>
>
>
>
> On Fri, 11 Jun 2004 23:55:05 GMT, "InfoQuest"
> <InfoQuest@worldnet.att.net> wrote:
>
> >Yes... we have been doing some extensive testing of True Image Please
> >thread in microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics True Image 7.0 - hpgs2wns.dll
> >Error/Virtual Drive/Restore Question. The title is a little misleading.
> >
> > It is a hard choice! Drive Image 7 appears to be having a number
> >challenges. CNET approval is only 25% and the latest PC Magazine review
> >only gave it 3 out of 5. Ghost 2003 has a CNET approval rating of 52%,
but
> >has moved past Drive Image in the latest PC Magazine review with a rating
of
> >4 out of 5. One concern in reading the reviews was the number of
people
> >having trouble getting it to work with externals. Acronis True Image
has a
> >CNET approval of 65% and was one of
> >the only to receive CNET editors choice. The only negative we found at
this
> >point is that it does not check the disk while restoring the image The
> >latest issue of PC Magazine rated it 5 out of 5 and gave it PC magazines
> >editors choice. You can get a 15 day trial version.
> >
> >http://www.acronis.com/download/
> >
> >
> >"not_over_the_hill" <watch_the_moneyNOSPAM@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> >news:9qehc0tf96e985v1jhkr6c7mtp032stmt3@4ax.com...
> >> On Wed, 9 Jun 2004 13:02:13 -0400, "Art" <notaname@notanisp> wrote:
> >>
> >> >
> >> >"Tim" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> >> >news:1a3a901c44dfd$f56f4030$a001280a@phx.gbl...
> >> >> I bought an external usb-firewire hard drive 120G.
> >> >> I want to use it to back up my C drive.
> >> >> What do I do now? I don't see a "back up your hard drive"
> >> >> choice anywhere! I have XP Home.
> >> >> Clueless as usual.
> >> >
> >> >Tim:
> >> >
> >> >You might consider using Symantec's Norton Ghost program (2003
version)
> >to
> >> >clone your internal hard drive to your USB external hard drive.
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >The advantage of this process is that for all practical purposes
you're
> >> >making an exact duplicate of your working internal drive. Everything
is
> >> >"backed up" - your operating system, registry, programs &
applications,
> >> >configuration settings, your data files - everything. Unlike virtually
> >every
> >> >other so-called "backup program" that merely backs up your data files,
> >i.e.,
> >> >the files you have created in your various programs.
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >The cloning process is relatively simple. Other than the external hard
> >drive
> >> >you'll be cloning to, disconnect any other external storage device(s),
> >e.g.,
> >> >ZIP drive, flash drive, etc., from the computer and boot up with the
> >Ghost
> >> >floppy disk (see below instructions for preparing the Ghost floppy)
and
> >use
> >> >the screen displays to select the source (internal hard drive) disk
and
> >the
> >> >destination (external hard drive) disk.
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >With a reasonably fast processor, your cloning speed (data transfer)
> >should
> >> >be about 400 to 500 MB/min. Should you be using a USB 1.0/1.1
connection,
> >> >your cloning speed will be about 40 to 50 MB/min.
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >Note that in some cases, connecting the USB external hard drive to a
USB
> >hub
> >> >prevents the cloning process. In those situations, the external drive
> >should
> >> >bypass the hub and be directly connected to the computer's USB port.
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >Another major advantage of this cloning process is that you can also
> >perform
> >> >the cloning operation in reverse, i.e., from the external hard drive
to
> >the
> >> >internal one, thus creating a bootable internal drive. Naturally in
this
> >> >situation during the cloning process the external hard drive becomes
the
> >> >source disk and the internal hard drive the destination disk. BTW, the
> >> >cloned USB external hard drive will not be bootable - at least in my
> >> >experience with XP. I have read many comments in the various
newsgroups
> >and
> >> >websites to the effect that an external USB hard drive is bootable as
> >long
> >> >as it's supported by the motherboard's BIOS. But I've yet to achieve
> >this.
> >> >If anyone has successfully booted (in XP) with a USB external hard
drive,
> >I
> >> >would be anxious to hear of their experience in this area.
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >I prefer to carry out the cloning operation using a Ghost floppy disk,
> >> >rather than using Ghost's Windows interface. I find this process
simple,
> >> >straightforward, and effective.
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >PREPARING THE GHOST FLOPPY DISK
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >1. Insert a blank floppy disk. It need not be formatted.
> >> >
> >> >2. Access your Ghost program. Make sure you have the latest version
> >2003.793
> >> >(as of 6/04). Use Symantec's built-in LiveUpdate feature to install
the
> >> >latest version in the event you're using an earlier version.
> >> >
> >> >3. Click on Ghost Utilities and select Norton Ghost Boot Wizard.
> >> >
> >> >4. Select Standard Ghost Boot Disk. On the following dialog box
(assuming
> >> >you have USB 2.0 capability), select "USB 2.0 Support" and check
"Assign
> >DOS
> >> >drive letters". Click Next.
> >> >
> >> >5. Select the "Use PC-DOS" option in the next dialog box.
> >> >
> >> >6. Complete the process following the screen prompts.
> >> >
> >> >7. Remove floppy and label accordingly.
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >With the USB external hard drive connected, boot up with the Ghost
floppy
> >> >and perform the cloning operation. You should be able to easily
perform
> >this
> >> >operation by stepping through Ghost's informative dialog boxes. Just
keep
> >in
> >> >mind that the source disk is your internal hard drive and the
destination
> >> >disk is your USB external hard drive. Also remember to disconnect any
> >other
> >> >storage devices you may have connected to your computer (ZIP drives,
> >> >flash/jump drives, etc.) before you begin the cloning operation.
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >Art
> >>
> >>
> >> I also have been reading about "TrueImage" and "DriveImage"
> >> for backup. From what I can gather, they will also do a "mirror
> >> image" backup, but do everthing in Windows.
> >>
> >> I do know that Ghost works because I have used it (from Dos)
> >> In order to do the clone in XP, requires the computer to boot
> >> from a floppy / or CD and execute in PC-dos.
> >>
> >> The advantage I see with "TrueImage" is that when creating
> >> an "image" backup, you can back up a few days later and
> >> do an incremental backup of only files that have changed or
> >> are new.
> >>
> >> Anyone have any personal experience with either "driveImage"
> >> or "TrueImage"???
> >>
> >> Thanks.
> >>
> >>
> >
>
Anonymous
June 20, 2004 3:53:10 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Thanks, Art... that's what I've got.

Been out of town for a week... but
needs to do a bkup. Will try it.



On Sat, 12 Jun 2004 10:02:16 -0400, "Art" <notaname@notanisp> wrote:

>In my experience, Ghost 2003 works just fine cloning your internal hard
>drive to an external USB hard drive. I've cloned to external USB hard drives
>dozens of times, using a variety of external USB hard drives without any
>problem whatsoever. As I indicated in my original posting, make sure you're
>using the latest version of Ghost 2003, i.e., Ghost 2003.793. Use Symantec's
>LiveUpdate feature to download the latest version.
>
>Art
>
>
>"not_over_the_hill" <watch_the_moneyNOSPAM@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>news:062lc053fdq04vavgmpticsijnsjsk81ol@4ax.com...
>> Been playing around with TrueImage and it seems OK.
>>
>> I used bothe TI and DriveImage and so far, I like
>> TrueImage a little better. Hard to know what
>> Symantec is going to do re: Ghost and DI.
>> Don't know which will survive, but I really
>> don't like the fact that it (Ghost) doesn't seem to work
>> well with ext. HD's. I know it's supposed to,
>> but I couldn't get Ghost 2003 to work.
>>
>> Could be me.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Fri, 11 Jun 2004 23:55:05 GMT, "InfoQuest"
>> <InfoQuest@worldnet.att.net> wrote:
>>
>> >Yes... we have been doing some extensive testing of True Image Please
>> >thread in microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics True Image 7.0 - hpgs2wns.dll
>> >Error/Virtual Drive/Restore Question. The title is a little misleading.
>> >
>> > It is a hard choice! Drive Image 7 appears to be having a number
>> >challenges. CNET approval is only 25% and the latest PC Magazine review
>> >only gave it 3 out of 5. Ghost 2003 has a CNET approval rating of 52%,
>but
>> >has moved past Drive Image in the latest PC Magazine review with a rating
>of
>> >4 out of 5. One concern in reading the reviews was the number of
>people
>> >having trouble getting it to work with externals. Acronis True Image
>has a
>> >CNET approval of 65% and was one of
>> >the only to receive CNET editors choice. The only negative we found at
>this
>> >point is that it does not check the disk while restoring the image The
>> >latest issue of PC Magazine rated it 5 out of 5 and gave it PC magazines
>> >editors choice. You can get a 15 day trial version.
>> >
>> >http://www.acronis.com/download/
>> >
>> >
>> >"not_over_the_hill" <watch_the_moneyNOSPAM@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>> >news:9qehc0tf96e985v1jhkr6c7mtp032stmt3@4ax.com...
>> >> On Wed, 9 Jun 2004 13:02:13 -0400, "Art" <notaname@notanisp> wrote:
>> >>
>> >> >
>> >> >"Tim" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
>> >> >news:1a3a901c44dfd$f56f4030$a001280a@phx.gbl...
>> >> >> I bought an external usb-firewire hard drive 120G.
>> >> >> I want to use it to back up my C drive.
>> >> >> What do I do now? I don't see a "back up your hard drive"
>> >> >> choice anywhere! I have XP Home.
>> >> >> Clueless as usual.
>> >> >
>> >> >Tim:
>> >> >
>> >> >You might consider using Symantec's Norton Ghost program (2003
>version)
>> >to
>> >> >clone your internal hard drive to your USB external hard drive.
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> >The advantage of this process is that for all practical purposes
>you're
>> >> >making an exact duplicate of your working internal drive. Everything
>is
>> >> >"backed up" - your operating system, registry, programs &
>applications,
>> >> >configuration settings, your data files - everything. Unlike virtually
>> >every
>> >> >other so-called "backup program" that merely backs up your data files,
>> >i.e.,
>> >> >the files you have created in your various programs.
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> >The cloning process is relatively simple. Other than the external hard
>> >drive
>> >> >you'll be cloning to, disconnect any other external storage device(s),
>> >e.g.,
>> >> >ZIP drive, flash drive, etc., from the computer and boot up with the
>> >Ghost
>> >> >floppy disk (see below instructions for preparing the Ghost floppy)
>and
>> >use
>> >> >the screen displays to select the source (internal hard drive) disk
>and
>> >the
>> >> >destination (external hard drive) disk.
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> >With a reasonably fast processor, your cloning speed (data transfer)
>> >should
>> >> >be about 400 to 500 MB/min. Should you be using a USB 1.0/1.1
>connection,
>> >> >your cloning speed will be about 40 to 50 MB/min.
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> >Note that in some cases, connecting the USB external hard drive to a
>USB
>> >hub
>> >> >prevents the cloning process. In those situations, the external drive
>> >should
>> >> >bypass the hub and be directly connected to the computer's USB port.
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> >Another major advantage of this cloning process is that you can also
>> >perform
>> >> >the cloning operation in reverse, i.e., from the external hard drive
>to
>> >the
>> >> >internal one, thus creating a bootable internal drive. Naturally in
>this
>> >> >situation during the cloning process the external hard drive becomes
>the
>> >> >source disk and the internal hard drive the destination disk. BTW, the
>> >> >cloned USB external hard drive will not be bootable - at least in my
>> >> >experience with XP. I have read many comments in the various
>newsgroups
>> >and
>> >> >websites to the effect that an external USB hard drive is bootable as
>> >long
>> >> >as it's supported by the motherboard's BIOS. But I've yet to achieve
>> >this.
>> >> >If anyone has successfully booted (in XP) with a USB external hard
>drive,
>> >I
>> >> >would be anxious to hear of their experience in this area.
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> >I prefer to carry out the cloning operation using a Ghost floppy disk,
>> >> >rather than using Ghost's Windows interface. I find this process
>simple,
>> >> >straightforward, and effective.
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> >PREPARING THE GHOST FLOPPY DISK
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> >1. Insert a blank floppy disk. It need not be formatted.
>> >> >
>> >> >2. Access your Ghost program. Make sure you have the latest version
>> >2003.793
>> >> >(as of 6/04). Use Symantec's built-in LiveUpdate feature to install
>the
>> >> >latest version in the event you're using an earlier version.
>> >> >
>> >> >3. Click on Ghost Utilities and select Norton Ghost Boot Wizard.
>> >> >
>> >> >4. Select Standard Ghost Boot Disk. On the following dialog box
>(assuming
>> >> >you have USB 2.0 capability), select "USB 2.0 Support" and check
>"Assign
>> >DOS
>> >> >drive letters". Click Next.
>> >> >
>> >> >5. Select the "Use PC-DOS" option in the next dialog box.
>> >> >
>> >> >6. Complete the process following the screen prompts.
>> >> >
>> >> >7. Remove floppy and label accordingly.
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> >With the USB external hard drive connected, boot up with the Ghost
>floppy
>> >> >and perform the cloning operation. You should be able to easily
>perform
>> >this
>> >> >operation by stepping through Ghost's informative dialog boxes. Just
>keep
>> >in
>> >> >mind that the source disk is your internal hard drive and the
>destination
>> >> >disk is your USB external hard drive. Also remember to disconnect any
>> >other
>> >> >storage devices you may have connected to your computer (ZIP drives,
>> >> >flash/jump drives, etc.) before you begin the cloning operation.
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> >Art
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> I also have been reading about "TrueImage" and "DriveImage"
>> >> for backup. From what I can gather, they will also do a "mirror
>> >> image" backup, but do everthing in Windows.
>> >>
>> >> I do know that Ghost works because I have used it (from Dos)
>> >> In order to do the clone in XP, requires the computer to boot
>> >> from a floppy / or CD and execute in PC-dos.
>> >>
>> >> The advantage I see with "TrueImage" is that when creating
>> >> an "image" backup, you can back up a few days later and
>> >> do an incremental backup of only files that have changed or
>> >> are new.
>> >>
>> >> Anyone have any personal experience with either "driveImage"
>> >> or "TrueImage"???
>> >>
>> >> Thanks.
>> >>
>> >>
>> >
>>
>
!