cpu heatsink and fan?

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

Hi

I always find leaving the heatsink from a cpu a little worrying! Maybe I am
doing it wrong but following the instructions that come with the basic amd
xp hsf, I seem to need to put a lot of force on the spring clip to get it to
engage, it always worries me that either my screwdriver will slip or i will
be damaging the motherboard by flexing it too much. It also seems that to
check the cpu hs compound on my a7n8x + Aopen h600 case i will need to
remove the motherboard :(

Is there a hsf that has an easier way of connecting to the cpu? Any chance
of it being quiet and good at cooling too? ;)

Thanks
D
17 answers Last reply
More about heatsink
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <chbu0o$3gr$1@news7.svr.pol.co.uk>, "DS" <DS@btinternet.com> wrote:

    > Hi
    >
    > I always find leaving the heatsink from a cpu a little worrying! Maybe I am
    > doing it wrong but following the instructions that come with the basic amd
    > xp hsf, I seem to need to put a lot of force on the spring clip to get it to
    > engage, it always worries me that either my screwdriver will slip or i will
    > be damaging the motherboard by flexing it too much. It also seems that to
    > check the cpu hs compound on my a7n8x + Aopen h600 case i will need to
    > remove the motherboard :(
    >
    > Is there a hsf that has an easier way of connecting to the cpu? Any chance
    > of it being quiet and good at cooling too? ;)
    >
    > Thanks
    > D

    The manual shows there are four holes next to the A7N8X socket.
    Maybe you could find a heatsink that screws to the motherboard ?

    http://www.overclockers.com/topiclist/index15.asp#HEATSINK%20REVIEWS%20AND%20TIPS

    There is a summary here:
    http://www.overclockers.com/articles373/socketA.asp

    The SLK900 at the top of the list, will serve as a good example.
    It uses a backing plate, and fastens to the board with four
    spring loaded screws. All of that is straight forward, as is
    the somewhat high weight of the heatsink.

    The tough part with these oversized heatsinks, is figuring out
    which way they will be oriented on your motherboard (long part
    runs horizontal or runs vertical - does the long part
    bump into the Northbridge heatsink, the DIMMs, any capacitors,
    parts of the socket etc ? ) and whether there is any beneficial
    spillage of air from the CPU heatsink, to help the Northbridge
    heatsink and/or Vcore circuit etc. When I was shopping for
    heatsinks a year ago, with some of these products, I read as
    much as I could about the product, but was never sure what
    I was getting into with the fit of the product.

    If you find a heatsink that more or less has the same dimensions
    as the socket, like the Swiftech MCX462-V, you don't get quite
    as good performance, but have less potential trouble with the fit.
    Notice how that heatsink actually uses the tabs on the heatsink,
    and spring loaded screws pull on the clips, to make them tight.
    The second page of the review for that heatsink, shows a thermal
    resistance of about 0.35 degrees C per watt of power dissipated,
    when a reasonably quiet fan configuration is used. That would
    be an acceptable solution, whereas a heatsink with a 0.50 C/W
    thermal resistance would be a waste of money. I think something
    that gives 0.25C/W is worth the money.

    The Zalman7000 (zalman.co.kr) is another option. In the case
    of the A7N8X, you need 8-9mm distance between the upper edge of
    the motherboard and the metal box of the PSU, in order to avoid
    the fins of the Zalman from contacting the case of the PSU. The
    AlCu is the lighter weight of the heatsinks (there are two
    versions - a pure Cu one and the AlCu one). The 7000 comes in
    7000, 7000a, and 7000b, and the later models have adapters to fit
    more socket types. I believe the 7000 didn't fare well on the
    "die simulator" used in the review, because the Zalman has a
    "cloud" of warm air right around the heatsink. There has to be
    a good flow of air through your computer case, to make the
    7000 work well. There are two aluminum "arms" that bolt to the
    four screw holes in the motherboard. Then, the Zalman clip screws
    to the two arms, via two more screws. On my P4 board, the final
    two screws are pretty easy to install, making it possible to
    remove or reinstall the heatsink, after the rest of the adapter
    has been installed. (Of course, to install the two arms, will require
    removing the motherboard, so you can be absolutely sure the
    parts used to screw the arms in place, don't short anything.)
    Note that, on some Athlon boards, the ends of the heatsink clip
    have to be sawed off, to clear capacitors near the mounting points.

    So, alternate heatsinks are a lot of work and research. Generally
    you just cannot buy a product, without doing as much work as the
    guy who designed the heatsink in the first place. The smaller
    heatsinks that don't have fit problems, probably don't have any
    better performance than the AMD heatsink, and those would be a
    waste of money.

    *****
    AMD has instructions for how to install an AMD heatsink. If you
    look on page 16 of this document, it shows how to use a nutdriver
    to push down the clip.

    http://www.amd.com/us-en/assets/content_type/white_papers_and_tech_docs/23986.pdf

    This works very nicely - all you have to do, is search through
    your hex socket collection, for just the right size of socket
    for the nutdriver. The nutdriver allows you to push down, but
    also exert lateral force, to move the clip out a bit and then
    under the tab. Much less risk than compared to a slot headed
    screwdriver, which gives no lateral control at all.

    HTH,
    Paul
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    On Sat, 04 Sep 2004 09:23:01 +0100, DS wrote:

    > Hi
    >
    > I always find leaving the heatsink from a cpu a little worrying! Maybe I am
    > doing it wrong but following the instructions that come with the basic amd
    > xp hsf, I seem to need to put a lot of force on the spring clip to get it to
    > engage, it always worries me that either my screwdriver will slip or i will
    > be damaging the motherboard by flexing it too much. It also seems that to
    > check the cpu hs compound on my a7n8x + Aopen h600 case i will need to
    > remove the motherboard :(
    >
    > Is there a hsf that has an easier way of connecting to the cpu? Any chance
    > of it being quiet and good at cooling too? ;)
    >
    TR2-M1 (or M3, not M2). Cheap, under $10. Quiet, 21dba. Rated for up to
    3400+. 3 prong clip that doesn't take much force to install and it has a
    non slip slot for the screwdriver. So, it's cheap, quiet, performs very
    good, and is easy to install. That makes it rate up at the top IMO.

    --
    Abit KT7-Raid (KT133) Tbred B core CPU @2400MHz (24x100FSB)
    http://mysite.verizon.net/res0exft/cpu.htm
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    DS wrote:
    > Hi
    >
    > I always find leaving the heatsink from a cpu a little worrying! Maybe I am
    > doing it wrong but following the instructions that come with the basic amd
    > xp hsf, I seem to need to put a lot of force on the spring clip to get it to
    > engage, it always worries me that either my screwdriver will slip

    That's usually very bad (it's happened to me)

    > or i will
    > be damaging the motherboard by flexing it too much.

    You can buy a thick and soft static matt and place the motherboard on
    this. Then install the CPU. Do NOT install it on a motherboard already
    mounted inside a case. Take the board OUT.

    > It also seems that to
    > check the cpu hs compound on my a7n8x + Aopen h600 case i will need to
    > remove the motherboard :(

    Why do you need to check this?

    >
    > Is there a hsf that has an easier way of connecting to the cpu? Any chance
    > of it being quiet and good at cooling too? ;)
    >
    > Thanks
    > D
    >
    >
    >
    >


    --
    spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    > Is there a hsf that has an easier way of connecting to the cpu? Any chance
    > of it being quiet and good at cooling too? ;)


    Spire heatsinks have captive screwdriver recesses on mounting spring ends,
    so it is impossible to slip screwdriver from spring and strike motherboard.
    Screwdriver is used like a tyre spoon, to easily guide (with leverage)
    mounting spring opening onto socket lug.
    Kind regards!
    Tadeusz
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    "DS" <DS@btinternet.com> wrote in message
    news:chbu0o$3gr$1@news7.svr.pol.co.uk...
    > Hi
    >
    > I always find leaving the heatsink from a cpu a little worrying! Maybe I
    am
    > doing it wrong but following the instructions that come with the basic amd
    > xp hsf, I seem to need to put a lot of force on the spring clip to get it
    to
    > engage, it always worries me that either my screwdriver will slip or i
    will
    > be damaging the motherboard by flexing it too much. It also seems that to
    > check the cpu hs compound on my a7n8x + Aopen h600 case i will need to
    > remove the motherboard :(
    >
    > Is there a hsf that has an easier way of connecting to the cpu? Any chance
    > of it being quiet and good at cooling too? ;)
    >
    > Thanks
    > D
    I'm sure this may draw fire, but it has worked for me. First, I remove
    the spring, & bend it just a tad--lay it sideways on a piece of paper & mark
    the original angle; then carefully bend it "flatter" so it won't take so
    much force. Second,to protect the mobo from flexing, I use a piece of paper
    towel, folded several times, & slide it under the mobo in an area that will
    support the mobo from downward force when attaching hs/fan. Third, I took
    a credit card & cut it so that it would just fit on top of the mobo to
    hopefully catch the tip of the tool using to attach the clip. (I saw this
    3rd idea of using a credit card posted on one of the newsgroups some months
    back.) HTH & good luck, s
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    David Maynard <dNOTmayn@ev1.net> writes:
    > You do realize there's a reason for the spring force on those things, right?

    To put out an eye?

    --
    Forte International, P.O. Box 1412, Ridgecrest, CA 93556-1412
    Ronald Cole <ronald@forte-intl.com> Phone: (760) 499-9142
    President, CEO Fax: (760) 499-9152
    My GPG fingerprint: C3AF 4BE9 BEA6 F1C2 B084 4A88 8851 E6C8 69E3 B00B
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    sdlomi2 wrote:

    > "DS" <DS@btinternet.com> wrote in message
    > news:chbu0o$3gr$1@news7.svr.pol.co.uk...
    >
    >>Hi
    >>
    >>I always find leaving the heatsink from a cpu a little worrying! Maybe I
    >
    > am
    >
    >>doing it wrong but following the instructions that come with the basic amd
    >>xp hsf, I seem to need to put a lot of force on the spring clip to get it
    >
    > to
    >
    >>engage, it always worries me that either my screwdriver will slip or i
    >
    > will
    >
    >>be damaging the motherboard by flexing it too much. It also seems that to
    >>check the cpu hs compound on my a7n8x + Aopen h600 case i will need to
    >>remove the motherboard :(
    >>
    >>Is there a hsf that has an easier way of connecting to the cpu? Any chance
    >>of it being quiet and good at cooling too? ;)
    >>
    >>Thanks
    >>D
    >
    > I'm sure this may draw fire, but it has worked for me. First, I remove
    > the spring, & bend it just a tad--lay it sideways on a piece of paper & mark
    > the original angle; then carefully bend it "flatter" so it won't take so
    > much force. Second,to protect the mobo from flexing, I use a piece of paper
    > towel, folded several times, & slide it under the mobo in an area that will
    > support the mobo from downward force when attaching hs/fan. Third, I took
    > a credit card & cut it so that it would just fit on top of the mobo to
    > hopefully catch the tip of the tool using to attach the clip. (I saw this
    > 3rd idea of using a credit card posted on one of the newsgroups some months
    > back.) HTH & good luck, s

    You do realize there's a reason for the spring force on those things, right?
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Ronald Cole wrote:

    > David Maynard <dNOTmayn@ev1.net> writes:
    >
    >>You do realize there's a reason for the spring force on those things, right?
    >
    >
    > To put out an eye?
    >

    Of course. It's all a vast conspiracy to destroy you along with the
    motherboard and processor.

    But back to reality, thermal transfer increases with increased contact
    pressure, and that's why modern heatsinks have higher spring pressure for
    the higher power CPUs.
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    "David Maynard" <dNOTmayn@ev1.net> wrote in message
    news:10jtbsffk3q18be@corp.supernews.com...
    > sdlomi2 wrote:
    >
    > > "DS" <DS@btinternet.com> wrote in message
    > > news:chbu0o$3gr$1@news7.svr.pol.co.uk...
    > >
    > >>Hi
    > >>
    > >>I always find leaving the heatsink from a cpu a little worrying! Maybe I
    > >
    > > am
    > >
    > >>doing it wrong but following the instructions that come with the basic
    amd
    > >>xp hsf, I seem to need to put a lot of force on the spring clip to get
    it
    > >
    > > to
    > >
    > >>engage, it always worries me that either my screwdriver will slip or i
    > >
    > > will
    > >
    > >>be damaging the motherboard by flexing it too much. It also seems that
    to
    > >>check the cpu hs compound on my a7n8x + Aopen h600 case i will need to
    > >>remove the motherboard :(
    > >>
    > >>Is there a hsf that has an easier way of connecting to the cpu? Any
    chance
    > >>of it being quiet and good at cooling too? ;)
    > >>
    > >>Thanks
    > >>D
    > >
    > > I'm sure this may draw fire, but it has worked for me. First, I
    remove
    > > the spring, & bend it just a tad--lay it sideways on a piece of paper &
    mark
    > > the original angle; then carefully bend it "flatter" so it won't take so
    > > much force. Second,to protect the mobo from flexing, I use a piece of
    paper
    > > towel, folded several times, & slide it under the mobo in an area that
    will
    > > support the mobo from downward force when attaching hs/fan. Third, I
    took
    > > a credit card & cut it so that it would just fit on top of the mobo to
    > > hopefully catch the tip of the tool using to attach the clip. (I saw
    this
    > > 3rd idea of using a credit card posted on one of the newsgroups some
    months
    > > back.) HTH & good luck, s
    >
    > You do realize there's a reason for the spring force on those things,
    right?
    >
    >
    > Yes, and thanks for pointing that out to me. I just cannot see how
    they justify as much force as is put on some. On the ones I've done, they
    seem plenty tight when I finish; however, noticeably easier to install. And
    I've watched the temps closely when 1st using them to ensure that parameter
    is still quite in line.
    I'm open to any differing opinions. Heaven knows I don't wish to lose
    ANOTHER cpu to an inadequate h/s-fan. BTW, the only one I have felt the
    need to loosen was the Vantec Aeroflow 7040 for AMD. I honestly think they
    could re-design their clips with 25-30% less force and do just as good a
    job--as long as we use a good h/s compound. s
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    sdlomi2 wrote:
    > "DS" <DS@btinternet.com> wrote in message
    > news:chbu0o$3gr$1@news7.svr.pol.co.uk...
    >
    >>Hi
    >>
    >>I always find leaving the heatsink from a cpu a little worrying! Maybe I
    >
    > am
    >---snip---
    >>Thanks
    >>D
    >
    ---snip---Second,to protect the mobo from flexing, I use a piece of paper
    > towel, folded several times, & slide it under the mobo in an area that will
    > support the mobo from downward force when attaching hs/fan.
    > ---snip
    >
    Very interesting, I use the wooden sticks from Haagen Dazs or Dove ice
    cream bars. Of course, only after I make sure I get all the chocolate
    off them. Any excuse for a good dessert. I'm not kidding. I just did
    that on a Soyo K7VME and it worked fine. After I was done, they
    conveniently slid all the way under the board and out into the bottom of
    the case. Sometimes I have to wedge a little bit of paper under them to
    make them slightly tight. It prevents the board from flexing too much.
  11. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    "stanmc" <stanmcn0spam@ameritech.net> wrote in message
    news:sTD%c.1778$vS.1014@newssvr15.news.prodigy.com...
    > sdlomi2 wrote:
    > > "DS" <DS@btinternet.com> wrote in message
    > > news:chbu0o$3gr$1@news7.svr.pol.co.uk...
    > >
    > >>Hi
    > >>
    > >>I always find leaving the heatsink from a cpu a little worrying! Maybe I
    > >
    > > am
    > >---snip---
    > >>Thanks
    > >>D
    > >
    > ---snip---Second,to protect the mobo from flexing, I use a piece of paper
    > > towel, folded several times, & slide it under the mobo in an area that
    will
    > > support the mobo from downward force when attaching hs/fan.
    > > ---snip
    > >
    > Very interesting, I use the wooden sticks from Haagen Dazs or Dove ice
    > cream bars. Of course, only after I make sure I get all the chocolate
    > off them. Any excuse for a good dessert. I'm not kidding. I just did
    > that on a Soyo K7VME and it worked fine. After I was done, they
    > conveniently slid all the way under the board and out into the bottom of
    > the case. Sometimes I have to wedge a little bit of paper under them to
    > make them slightly tight. It prevents the board from flexing too much.

    Talk about interesting! I think the Haagen Dazs solution is a great
    idea-- as a saying that has travelled widely goes: "The worst ice cream I
    ever tried tasted wonderful!" s
  12. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    sdlomi2 wrote:

    > "David Maynard" <dNOTmayn@ev1.net> wrote in message
    > news:10jtbsffk3q18be@corp.supernews.com...
    >
    >>sdlomi2 wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>"DS" <DS@btinternet.com> wrote in message
    >>>news:chbu0o$3gr$1@news7.svr.pol.co.uk...
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Hi
    >>>>
    >>>>I always find leaving the heatsink from a cpu a little worrying! Maybe I
    >>>
    >>>am
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>doing it wrong but following the instructions that come with the basic
    >
    > amd
    >
    >>>>xp hsf, I seem to need to put a lot of force on the spring clip to get
    >
    > it
    >
    >>>to
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>engage, it always worries me that either my screwdriver will slip or i
    >>>
    >>>will
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>be damaging the motherboard by flexing it too much. It also seems that
    >
    > to
    >
    >>>>check the cpu hs compound on my a7n8x + Aopen h600 case i will need to
    >>>>remove the motherboard :(
    >>>>
    >>>>Is there a hsf that has an easier way of connecting to the cpu? Any
    >
    > chance
    >
    >>>>of it being quiet and good at cooling too? ;)
    >>>>
    >>>>Thanks
    >>>>D
    >>>
    >>> I'm sure this may draw fire, but it has worked for me. First, I
    >
    > remove
    >
    >>>the spring, & bend it just a tad--lay it sideways on a piece of paper &
    >
    > mark
    >
    >>>the original angle; then carefully bend it "flatter" so it won't take so
    >>>much force. Second,to protect the mobo from flexing, I use a piece of
    >
    > paper
    >
    >>>towel, folded several times, & slide it under the mobo in an area that
    >
    > will
    >
    >>>support the mobo from downward force when attaching hs/fan. Third, I
    >
    > took
    >
    >>>a credit card & cut it so that it would just fit on top of the mobo to
    >>>hopefully catch the tip of the tool using to attach the clip. (I saw
    >
    > this
    >
    >>>3rd idea of using a credit card posted on one of the newsgroups some
    >
    > months
    >
    >>>back.) HTH & good luck, s
    >>
    >>You do realize there's a reason for the spring force on those things,
    >
    > right?
    >
    >>
    >> Yes, and thanks for pointing that out to me. I just cannot see how
    >
    > they justify as much force as is put on some.

    Well, you'd have to get a hold of their design engineers and find out what
    the design requirements are and what equations they were using, but it
    isn't as if someone just pulled 'X'lbs of force out of thin air for the fun
    of it.

    Thermal transfer increases with increased contact pressure.

    > On the ones I've done, they
    > seem plenty tight when I finish; however, noticeably easier to install. And
    > I've watched the temps closely when 1st using them to ensure that parameter
    > is still quite in line.
    > I'm open to any differing opinions. Heaven knows I don't wish to lose
    > ANOTHER cpu to an inadequate h/s-fan. BTW, the only one I have felt the
    > need to loosen was the Vantec Aeroflow 7040 for AMD. I honestly think they
    > could re-design their clips with 25-30% less force and do just as good a
    > job--as long as we use a good h/s compound. s
    >
    >
  13. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    ¼" drive ratchet with a long extension like 6 or 8 inches and a socket that
    just fits over the tab on the heatsink clip.
    1) In order to make it slip off the tab you have to be braindamaged; and I
    don't mean a little.
    2) You can put a hell of a lot of pressure on the tab that way.... if you need to.
    3) With most HS brackets in addition to pushing them down, you have to
    hook them over the tabs on the ZIF socket. With the long extension, and not
    having to balance the damn screwdriver on the metal tab, you can use your
    other hand on the extension to guide the HS bracket to the ZIF tabs.
    4) If you're using the socket to get the HS OFF, after you force the HS bracket
    down, you can move it away from the ZIF tabs just by levering the extension
    against the side of the heatsink.

    I wouldn't put on that type heatsink any other way.

    If you lay the MB on the desk to put on the HS, you can make neat patterns
    in the desktop....

    On Sat, 4 Sep 2004 09:23:01 +0100, "DS" <DS@btinternet.com> wrote:

    >Hi
    >
    >I always find leaving the heatsink from a cpu a little worrying! Maybe I am
    >doing it wrong but following the instructions that come with the basic amd
    >xp hsf, I seem to need to put a lot of force on the spring clip to get it to
    >engage, it always worries me that either my screwdriver will slip or i will
    >be damaging the motherboard by flexing it too much. It also seems that to
    >check the cpu hs compound on my a7n8x + Aopen h600 case i will need to
    >remove the motherboard :(
    >
    >Is there a hsf that has an easier way of connecting to the cpu? Any chance
    >of it being quiet and good at cooling too? ;)
    >
    >Thanks
    >D
    ~~~~~~
    Bait for spammers:
    root@localhost
    postmaster@localhost
    admin@localhost
    abuse@localhost
    postmaster@[127.0.0.1]
    uce@ftc.gov
    ~~~~~~
    Remove "spamless" to email me.
  14. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Overlord wrote:

    > ¼" drive ratchet with a long extension like 6 or 8 inches and a socket that
    > just fits over the tab on the heatsink clip.

    That is a good idea for clips that have a 'tab'.

    Not all do.

    > 1) In order to make it slip off the tab you have to be braindamaged; and I
    > don't mean a little.
    > 2) You can put a hell of a lot of pressure on the tab that way.... if you need to.
    > 3) With most HS brackets in addition to pushing them down, you have to
    > hook them over the tabs on the ZIF socket. With the long extension, and not
    > having to balance the damn screwdriver on the metal tab, you can use your
    > other hand on the extension to guide the HS bracket to the ZIF tabs.
    > 4) If you're using the socket to get the HS OFF, after you force the HS bracket
    > down, you can move it away from the ZIF tabs just by levering the extension
    > against the side of the heatsink.
    >
    > I wouldn't put on that type heatsink any other way.
    >
    > If you lay the MB on the desk to put on the HS, you can make neat patterns
    > in the desktop....
    >
    > On Sat, 4 Sep 2004 09:23:01 +0100, "DS" <DS@btinternet.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Hi
    >>
    >>I always find leaving the heatsink from a cpu a little worrying! Maybe I am
    >>doing it wrong but following the instructions that come with the basic amd
    >>xp hsf, I seem to need to put a lot of force on the spring clip to get it to
    >>engage, it always worries me that either my screwdriver will slip or i will
    >>be damaging the motherboard by flexing it too much. It also seems that to
    >>check the cpu hs compound on my a7n8x + Aopen h600 case i will need to
    >>remove the motherboard :(
    >>
    >>Is there a hsf that has an easier way of connecting to the cpu? Any chance
    >>of it being quiet and good at cooling too? ;)
    >>
    >>Thanks
    >>D
    >
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  15. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    David Maynard wrote:
    > Overlord wrote:
    >
    >> ¼" drive ratchet with a long extension like 6 or 8 inches and a socket
    >> that
    >> just fits over the tab on the heatsink clip.
    >
    >
    > That is a good idea for clips that have a 'tab'.
    >
    > Not all do.

    I've had one break on me during attachment as well!

    --
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  16. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    spodosaurus wrote:

    > David Maynard wrote:
    >
    >> Overlord wrote:
    >>
    >>> ¼" drive ratchet with a long extension like 6 or 8 inches and a
    >>> socket that
    >>> just fits over the tab on the heatsink clip.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> That is a good idea for clips that have a 'tab'.
    >>
    >> Not all do.
    >
    >
    > I've had one break on me during attachment as well!
    >

    Hmm. I never had that problem.

    But what I was referring to are clips that have a recessed slot rather than
    a protruding 'tab'. Simply nothing to put a socket ON. On the other hand,
    if you use a right sized screw driver it won't slip out.
  17. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    "David Maynard" <dNOTmayn@ev1.net> wrote
    But what I was referring to are clips that have a recessed slot rather than
    a protruding 'tab'. Simply nothing to put a socket ON. On the other hand,
    if you use a right sized screw driver it won't slip out.

    Concentrate... concentrate... or it will!


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