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Question: Adding Wireless to a Hard-Wired Home Office (w/W..

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Anonymous
a b F Wireless
January 4, 2005 7:50:47 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

Hi.

I've been running a productive small network in my home for over 3 years
now. I have a mix of Windows OS's (XP, 98, NT4 and 2000), and even an old
OS/2 box. All sharing the internet, files and printers happily. All
hard-wired to my Netopia R9100 router and DSL modem.

My Netopia is the limited user variety ... I have 8 ports and I believe 12
IP's I can use. I also use its configuration to route email and web
requests to a server machine. The SMTP server is on a non-standard port.

I have a machine I want to put downstairs in a far corner of the house.
Wireless seems like the thing to do, but I'm unclear as to what I must do to
add this to my network. Internet sharing is important, but so is access to
disk drives. I want it to look like any other machine on my network.

First question: What would I need to do to simply make a wireless link from
my Netopia to this new machine? I do have an empty cable plug on the
router. Is this difficult? To make a single wireless machine appear on the
network like any other hardwired machine?

The Tougher Thought: I'd even consider switching routers to a newer
wireless, as long as it had some hardwired connections, too. However, I
need to make sure I can route web and email traffic to the correct internal
IP. Reading boxes and online info, I have been unable to tell if today's
lower end wireless routers offer this capability. Is this common? Can
anyone recommend a specific brand/model that they know does this?

I'd go for a newer router only because I can see adding more machines later.
Wireless sure would make life easier.

Thanks in advance,

Nick
January 5, 2005 2:41:18 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

Hi

There is few ways to slice this cake.

However if you would like to leave your current system as is.

Buy an Access Point and plug it to the any available port on the Router or
the switch.

Buy Client Wireless Card for the "lonely" far away computer.

It takes few minutes to configure and done. Wireless just replaces the wire
past the actual Wireless configuration the Network Setting and Sharing is
the same as the Wired.

The following pages might serve as a general primer.

Wireless Router as an AP: http://www.ezlan.net/router_AP.html

Wireless hardware: http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Hardware.html

Wireless - Basic Configuration: http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Config.html

Wireless - Basic Security: http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Security.html

Extending Distance: http://www.ezlan.net/Distance.html

Jack (MVP-Networking).




"Nick Knight" <bhnc_140_@mindspring.com> wrote in message
news:41da20a1$1$avpx$mr2ice@news.east.earthlink.net...
> Hi.
>
> I've been running a productive small network in my home for over 3 years
> now. I have a mix of Windows OS's (XP, 98, NT4 and 2000), and even an old
> OS/2 box. All sharing the internet, files and printers happily. All
> hard-wired to my Netopia R9100 router and DSL modem.
>
> My Netopia is the limited user variety ... I have 8 ports and I believe 12
> IP's I can use. I also use its configuration to route email and web
> requests to a server machine. The SMTP server is on a non-standard port.
>
> I have a machine I want to put downstairs in a far corner of the house.
> Wireless seems like the thing to do, but I'm unclear as to what I must do
to
> add this to my network. Internet sharing is important, but so is access
to
> disk drives. I want it to look like any other machine on my network.
>
> First question: What would I need to do to simply make a wireless link
from
> my Netopia to this new machine? I do have an empty cable plug on the
> router. Is this difficult? To make a single wireless machine appear on
the
> network like any other hardwired machine?
>
> The Tougher Thought: I'd even consider switching routers to a newer
> wireless, as long as it had some hardwired connections, too. However, I
> need to make sure I can route web and email traffic to the correct
internal
> IP. Reading boxes and online info, I have been unable to tell if today's
> lower end wireless routers offer this capability. Is this common? Can
> anyone recommend a specific brand/model that they know does this?
>
> I'd go for a newer router only because I can see adding more machines
later.
> Wireless sure would make life easier.
>
> Thanks in advance,
>
> Nick
>
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
January 6, 2005 6:46:32 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

In <ObSNaCu8EHA.2192@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl>, on 01/04/2005
at 11:41 PM, "Jack" <JackMDS@verizon.net> said:

>There is few ways to slice this cake.

>However if you would like to leave your current system as is.

>Buy an Access Point and plug it to the any available port on the Router or
>the switch.

>Buy Client Wireless Card for the "lonely" far away computer.

>It takes few minutes to configure and done. Wireless just replaces the wire
>past the actual Wireless configuration the Network Setting and Sharing is
>the same as the Wired.

Thanks, Jack. I was beginning to worry that my question was too verbose,
and no one would answer!

If I don't find a better solution, I will do exactly what you've suggested.

However, what I'm still hoping to find out is that there is some type of
"access point" that provides for multiple wireless hookups. Where network
sharing is the same as with hardwire ... and I can use some of the
still-available IP addresses my router can handle.

I suppose I could get by with simply adding this single remote PC to my
network ... using an Access Point. Adding yet-another PC is a remote
chance, and wouldn't happen soon. Perhaps I'll have other/better options
when it becomes necessary.

Thanks again for your reply,

Nick
!