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ADSL/CABLE Internet connection question,PLEASE!

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Anonymous
June 29, 2004 8:47:59 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Hello world!

I have Windows XP Pro.

I wonder if I could configure ONE computer to be connected to the Internet
both using ADSL and CABLE.
Of course,not simultanously.Just to have 2 Dial Up Connections (not
analog,but PPP virtual ones) and use them one after another.
ONE-PPTP (VPN) for Cable modem connection and SECOND-,say,PPPoATM for USB
ADSL modem connection.
I have a NIC and my cable modem is connected to it.It's LAN and I have
172.2X.X.X IP address from cable Co. at all times and when I want to connect
to the Internet I Dial to my ISP and get an external IP address from
it-80.179.X.X in my case...(each time it's different,naturally)-Open Access
type.
I have USB port and I can get a USB ADSL modem and use a PPPoA type of
connection with it.
And to use the same ISP (whether with the same or not account with it-it
doesn't matter here)...

The way I understand it-it should work OK...The unclear part is.....is it
the NIC or the modem that gets 172.X.X.X address? In Cable....Some ppl don't
have NIC's in their PC's...they use USB Cable modems...but they would still
have that 172.X.X.X address...so it's not the NIC,but the modem who gets
it....or am I wrong?

If I also have a USB ADSL modem,then that modem would get a 10.X.X.X IP
address from TELCO at all times


So the bottom line is....the way I get it....my Cable modem would constantly
have that 172.X.X.X address from Cable Co ( same as my NIC).AND my ADSL
modem would constantly have 10.X.X.X address from TELCO.
Whenever I use a Dial Up PPTP VPN adapter it would get a 80.179.X.X address
from my ISP and I would get on the Internet using cable infrustructure.Then
I disconnect...Then I'll use a PPoA connection (the virtual adapter is
installed ,using a software that comes with the ADSL modem-Globespan ALE
series...) and I would get also 80.179.X.X address from ISP,using my another
account with it (the ADSL one).


--
Thanks in advance,

Yours truly,
Alon Brodski
Anonymous
June 29, 2004 8:48:00 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Alon Brodski wrote:
> Hello world!
>
> I have Windows XP Pro.
>
> I wonder if I could configure ONE computer to be connected to the Internet
> both using ADSL and CABLE.
> Of course,not simultanously.Just to have 2 Dial Up Connections (not
> analog,but PPP virtual ones) and use them one after another.
> ONE-PPTP (VPN) for Cable modem connection and SECOND-,say,PPPoATM for USB
> ADSL modem connection.
> I have a NIC and my cable modem is connected to it.It's LAN and I have
> 172.2X.X.X IP address from cable Co. at all times and when I want to connect
> to the Internet I Dial to my ISP and get an external IP address from
> it-80.179.X.X in my case...(each time it's different,naturally)-Open Access
> type.
> I have USB port and I can get a USB ADSL modem and use a PPPoA type of
> connection with it.
> And to use the same ISP (whether with the same or not account with it-it
> doesn't matter here)...
>
> The way I understand it-it should work OK...The unclear part is.....is it
> the NIC or the modem that gets 172.X.X.X address? In Cable....Some ppl don't
> have NIC's in their PC's...they use USB Cable modems...but they would still
> have that 172.X.X.X address...so it's not the NIC,but the modem who gets
> it....or am I wrong?
>
> If I also have a USB ADSL modem,then that modem would get a 10.X.X.X IP
> address from TELCO at all times
>
>
> So the bottom line is....the way I get it....my Cable modem would constantly
> have that 172.X.X.X address from Cable Co ( same as my NIC).AND my ADSL
> modem would constantly have 10.X.X.X address from TELCO.
> Whenever I use a Dial Up PPTP VPN adapter it would get a 80.179.X.X address
> from my ISP and I would get on the Internet using cable infrustructure.Then
> I disconnect...Then I'll use a PPoA connection (the virtual adapter is
> installed ,using a software that comes with the ADSL modem-Globespan ALE
> series...) and I would get also 80.179.X.X address from ISP,using my another
> account with it (the ADSL one).
>
>
Your request is kind of confusing...so here is my attmept at explaining
what I think is going on.

Cable: Regardless of how you connect, the cable modem itself never gets
an IP address. The modem itself does not support the IP protocol. The
first NIC it encounters, however, does get the IP address--whether it's
an actual NIC or an XP-emulated one (via USB interface). The NIC,
whatever type it is, will show up under Network Connections.

DSL: In this case, the IP address is assigned at the head end, before it
ever reaches your computer or your DSL modem. Like cable, if you connect
via USB, the connection will again appear in Network Connections.

Dial-Up: This works the same way as DSL; the IP address is assigned when
you dial up, not at your end, but at the router you dial into. Once
again, the modem will appear in Network Connections.

Now you can have any one, or all three network connections going at the
same time. You can also bridge any two (or all three) connections.
(Highly not recommended on a commercial network.)

Now, will you get an increase in network bandwidth by having multiple
connections going? Nope. Remember that the distant end server will
respond to the IP address that made the request, not all three, despite
all the websites that have you making registry changes to do this.

By the way, the following IP addresses are not routable over the
Internet and are dropped by the first router they encounter:

10.0.0.0 - 10.255.255.255 (10/8 prefix)
172.16.0.0 - 172.31.255.255 (172.16/12 prefix)
192.168.0.0 - 192.168.255.255 (192.168/16 prefix)


So, your 10.x.x.x and 172.x.x.x are not the IP addresses your service
providers use to allow you to access the Internet. These are most likely
NAT'd addresses.

courtney sends....
Anonymous
June 30, 2004 1:57:36 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Hey!

Thanks for your kind help!

Well...I'm not sure what NAT is...may be you can explain? But about 172 and
10 IP addresses...
I know that those are invalid Internet IP addresses.That's why I call them
internal ones, as opposed to external ones that are valid on the
Internet....
The reason why I get the 172 IP address is 'cos my PC is a part of LAN ,so
it gets it all the time.
So I was right that I CAN have both cable and ADSL connections on the same
PC...?
I don't plan to connect at the same time,but to have one connection going or
the other.
I have to use a VPN Dial Up Connection window to "dial" to my ISP.
So it's not like I get online automatically anyways....
And even if I was (like it happens in the US in case of cable modems from
what I heard) I could simply disable my NIC,period.
As far as network bandwith goes....T1 is what I have now from cable is
enough...I can even get 2 Mb ADSL connection through local TELCO (Bezeq).Not
sure if it's worth it....whether I would actually get exactly 2 Mb...
'cos I do get them from the cable....
So I can have more than one VPN connecton going at the same time under XP?
So my PC would have one external IP address in PPP adapter in Windows (that
dial-up program that I use) and my NIC would have that 172 address from
cable and my modem would have 10 address from TELCO?

Alon.




"Courtney" <a@b.c> wrote in message news:o KhEc.22735$wS2.1206@okepread03...
> Alon Brodski wrote:
> > Hello world!
> >
> > I have Windows XP Pro.
> >
> > I wonder if I could configure ONE computer to be connected to the
Internet
> > both using ADSL and CABLE.
> > Of course,not simultanously.Just to have 2 Dial Up Connections (not
> > analog,but PPP virtual ones) and use them one after another.
> > ONE-PPTP (VPN) for Cable modem connection and SECOND-,say,PPPoATM for
USB
> > ADSL modem connection.
> > I have a NIC and my cable modem is connected to it.It's LAN and I have
> > 172.2X.X.X IP address from cable Co. at all times and when I want to
connect
> > to the Internet I Dial to my ISP and get an external IP address from
> > it-80.179.X.X in my case...(each time it's different,naturally)-Open
Access
> > type.
> > I have USB port and I can get a USB ADSL modem and use a PPPoA type of
> > connection with it.
> > And to use the same ISP (whether with the same or not account with it-it
> > doesn't matter here)...
> >
> > The way I understand it-it should work OK...The unclear part is.....is
it
> > the NIC or the modem that gets 172.X.X.X address? In Cable....Some ppl
don't
> > have NIC's in their PC's...they use USB Cable modems...but they would
still
> > have that 172.X.X.X address...so it's not the NIC,but the modem who gets
> > it....or am I wrong?
> >
> > If I also have a USB ADSL modem,then that modem would get a 10.X.X.X IP
> > address from TELCO at all times
> >
> >
> > So the bottom line is....the way I get it....my Cable modem would
constantly
> > have that 172.X.X.X address from Cable Co ( same as my NIC).AND my ADSL
> > modem would constantly have 10.X.X.X address from TELCO.
> > Whenever I use a Dial Up PPTP VPN adapter it would get a 80.179.X.X
address
> > from my ISP and I would get on the Internet using cable
infrustructure.Then
> > I disconnect...Then I'll use a PPoA connection (the virtual adapter is
> > installed ,using a software that comes with the ADSL modem-Globespan ALE
> > series...) and I would get also 80.179.X.X address from ISP,using my
another
> > account with it (the ADSL one).
> >
> >
> Your request is kind of confusing...so here is my attmept at explaining
> what I think is going on.
>
> Cable: Regardless of how you connect, the cable modem itself never gets
> an IP address. The modem itself does not support the IP protocol. The
> first NIC it encounters, however, does get the IP address--whether it's
> an actual NIC or an XP-emulated one (via USB interface). The NIC,
> whatever type it is, will show up under Network Connections.
>
> DSL: In this case, the IP address is assigned at the head end, before it
> ever reaches your computer or your DSL modem. Like cable, if you connect
> via USB, the connection will again appear in Network Connections.
>
> Dial-Up: This works the same way as DSL; the IP address is assigned when
> you dial up, not at your end, but at the router you dial into. Once
> again, the modem will appear in Network Connections.
>
> Now you can have any one, or all three network connections going at the
> same time. You can also bridge any two (or all three) connections.
> (Highly not recommended on a commercial network.)
>
> Now, will you get an increase in network bandwidth by having multiple
> connections going? Nope. Remember that the distant end server will
> respond to the IP address that made the request, not all three, despite
> all the websites that have you making registry changes to do this.
>
> By the way, the following IP addresses are not routable over the
> Internet and are dropped by the first router they encounter:
>
> 10.0.0.0 - 10.255.255.255 (10/8 prefix)
> 172.16.0.0 - 172.31.255.255 (172.16/12 prefix)
> 192.168.0.0 - 192.168.255.255 (192.168/16 prefix)
>
>
> So, your 10.x.x.x and 172.x.x.x are not the IP addresses your service
> providers use to allow you to access the Internet. These are most likely
> NAT'd addresses.
>
> courtney sends....
Related resources
Anonymous
June 30, 2004 1:57:37 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

not to be rude but please ignore courtney's post, it is full of erronous info

cable modem.....
does receive and retain an ip address, then assigns that ip to your connected ethernet device acting as a nat (network address translation router) it basically works like a bridge with the ip address on the wan (out to cable company and internet) being assigned to the connected ethernet port (your p.c., cable router etc...) the internal hardware / software in the cable modem is designed to just forward the info between the two sides of itself and to the outside world it looks as if your cable modem's ip address is you and from your side it looks like your ip address is yours and the cable modem is transparent.


dsl using pppoa or pppoe.....
pppoa by the way stands for point to point protocol over atm and means that your dsl modem's port side facing your telco (telephone company) is sending atm packet info on an unpreassigned pathway through an atm network. This doesn't mean it isn't assigned a virtual path or virtual channel but that until it connects to the dslam (don't ask its short for dsl and then the asynchronous modulator, which is the otehr end of the dsl connection in the telco's central office) its pathway through the internal telco network (after the dslam towards the internet router) isn't pre-designated but gets assigned at time of connection. it does however get pre-assigned a vp (virtual path) and vc (virtual channel) ahead of time for the connection from the modem to the dslam.

pppoe is point to point protocol over ethernet. and acts very similar to pppoa with the difference being that the internal vp / vc route through the telco's network is pre-assigned as it has to translate to a specific router which has your ip address info (can be dynamically assigned using login credentials, or static). pppoa differs in that it scans the atm network for the router with your static ip (if you program it so) or your logon credentials, and trys to locate the best pathway to that.


obviously pppoe is faster and hence most telco's use it. however some smaller third parties with say only one router will use pppoa as it's easier to set up and maintain, and link through the telco's network.


now on to your specific issue.........


no you can't, and yes possibly you could.......
you'd need a bridge machine with some server software installed for ip packet routing inbetween to manage it though. so from one p.c. no you can't use both easily (you can use them one at a time but would need to redo your network connection settings each time you switch), and definately not at the same time.

with a server with ip network packet balancing features (win server 2k, win server 2003, linux, unix, solaris etc...) you could plug both into it and tell it to bridge the connections across the internal lan and to balance the load between the two.



hope this helps

and if you're using a pppoa usb modem..... don't
inquire as to a pppoe lan ported modem and then with a more serious router you could connect both up and use specific ports for one isp connection (file sharing networks, ftp account etc...) and the other isp for other port duties (80 and 443 for web surfing, various for gamming etc....) with ethernet you could use both isp's with nothing more than a capable router inbetween and then split the jobs based on port requirements

"Alon Brodski" wrote:

> Hey!
>
> Thanks for your kind help!
>
> Well...I'm not sure what NAT is...may be you can explain? But about 172 and
> 10 IP addresses...
> I know that those are invalid Internet IP addresses.That's why I call them
> internal ones, as opposed to external ones that are valid on the
> Internet....
> The reason why I get the 172 IP address is 'cos my PC is a part of LAN ,so
> it gets it all the time.
> So I was right that I CAN have both cable and ADSL connections on the same
> PC...?
> I don't plan to connect at the same time,but to have one connection going or
> the other.
> I have to use a VPN Dial Up Connection window to "dial" to my ISP.
> So it's not like I get online automatically anyways....
> And even if I was (like it happens in the US in case of cable modems from
> what I heard) I could simply disable my NIC,period.
> As far as network bandwith goes....T1 is what I have now from cable is
> enough...I can even get 2 Mb ADSL connection through local TELCO (Bezeq).Not
> sure if it's worth it....whether I would actually get exactly 2 Mb...
> 'cos I do get them from the cable....
> So I can have more than one VPN connecton going at the same time under XP?
> So my PC would have one external IP address in PPP adapter in Windows (that
> dial-up program that I use) and my NIC would have that 172 address from
> cable and my modem would have 10 address from TELCO?
>
> Alon.
>
>
>
>
> "Courtney" <a@b.c> wrote in message news:o KhEc.22735$wS2.1206@okepread03...
> > Alon Brodski wrote:
> > > Hello world!
> > >
> > > I have Windows XP Pro.
> > >
> > > I wonder if I could configure ONE computer to be connected to the
> Internet
> > > both using ADSL and CABLE.
> > > Of course,not simultanously.Just to have 2 Dial Up Connections (not
> > > analog,but PPP virtual ones) and use them one after another.
> > > ONE-PPTP (VPN) for Cable modem connection and SECOND-,say,PPPoATM for
> USB
> > > ADSL modem connection.
> > > I have a NIC and my cable modem is connected to it.It's LAN and I have
> > > 172.2X.X.X IP address from cable Co. at all times and when I want to
> connect
> > > to the Internet I Dial to my ISP and get an external IP address from
> > > it-80.179.X.X in my case...(each time it's different,naturally)-Open
> Access
> > > type.
> > > I have USB port and I can get a USB ADSL modem and use a PPPoA type of
> > > connection with it.
> > > And to use the same ISP (whether with the same or not account with it-it
> > > doesn't matter here)...
> > >
> > > The way I understand it-it should work OK...The unclear part is.....is
> it
> > > the NIC or the modem that gets 172.X.X.X address? In Cable....Some ppl
> don't
> > > have NIC's in their PC's...they use USB Cable modems...but they would
> still
> > > have that 172.X.X.X address...so it's not the NIC,but the modem who gets
> > > it....or am I wrong?
> > >
> > > If I also have a USB ADSL modem,then that modem would get a 10.X.X.X IP
> > > address from TELCO at all times
> > >
> > >
> > > So the bottom line is....the way I get it....my Cable modem would
> constantly
> > > have that 172.X.X.X address from Cable Co ( same as my NIC).AND my ADSL
> > > modem would constantly have 10.X.X.X address from TELCO.
> > > Whenever I use a Dial Up PPTP VPN adapter it would get a 80.179.X.X
> address
> > > from my ISP and I would get on the Internet using cable
> infrustructure.Then
> > > I disconnect...Then I'll use a PPoA connection (the virtual adapter is
> > > installed ,using a software that comes with the ADSL modem-Globespan ALE
> > > series...) and I would get also 80.179.X.X address from ISP,using my
> another
> > > account with it (the ADSL one).
> > >
> > >
> > Your request is kind of confusing...so here is my attmept at explaining
> > what I think is going on.
> >
> > Cable: Regardless of how you connect, the cable modem itself never gets
> > an IP address. The modem itself does not support the IP protocol. The
> > first NIC it encounters, however, does get the IP address--whether it's
> > an actual NIC or an XP-emulated one (via USB interface). The NIC,
> > whatever type it is, will show up under Network Connections.
> >
> > DSL: In this case, the IP address is assigned at the head end, before it
> > ever reaches your computer or your DSL modem. Like cable, if you connect
> > via USB, the connection will again appear in Network Connections.
> >
> > Dial-Up: This works the same way as DSL; the IP address is assigned when
> > you dial up, not at your end, but at the router you dial into. Once
> > again, the modem will appear in Network Connections.
> >
> > Now you can have any one, or all three network connections going at the
> > same time. You can also bridge any two (or all three) connections.
> > (Highly not recommended on a commercial network.)
> >
> > Now, will you get an increase in network bandwidth by having multiple
> > connections going? Nope. Remember that the distant end server will
> > respond to the IP address that made the request, not all three, despite
> > all the websites that have you making registry changes to do this.
> >
> > By the way, the following IP addresses are not routable over the
> > Internet and are dropped by the first router they encounter:
> >
> > 10.0.0.0 - 10.255.255.255 (10/8 prefix)
> > 172.16.0.0 - 172.31.255.255 (172.16/12 prefix)
> > 192.168.0.0 - 192.168.255.255 (192.168/16 prefix)
> >
> >
> > So, your 10.x.x.x and 172.x.x.x are not the IP addresses your service
> > providers use to allow you to access the Internet. These are most likely
> > NAT'd addresses.
> >
> > courtney sends....
>
>
>
Anonymous
June 30, 2004 1:57:38 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

sorry didn't catch that you wanted to use each one at a time.....

so with that, yes just unplug the cable modem and then reset the ip address info to your p.c. by launching your pppoa "dial up" connection. or .....

uncconect from the pppoa "dial up" connection and plug in your cable modem and then, goto the start menu, click on "run"

type cmd in the window provided and click the run button or just hit enter.

in the dos window type "ipconfig /renew /all"

then afterwards just click the x in the top right to close the dos window

"the dude" wrote:

> not to be rude but please ignore courtney's post, it is full of erronous info
>
> cable modem.....
> does receive and retain an ip address, then assigns that ip to your connected ethernet device acting as a nat (network address translation router) it basically works like a bridge with the ip address on the wan (out to cable company and internet) being assigned to the connected ethernet port (your p.c., cable router etc...) the internal hardware / software in the cable modem is designed to just forward the info between the two sides of itself and to the outside world it looks as if your cable modem's ip address is you and from your side it looks like your ip address is yours and the cable modem is transparent.
>
>
> dsl using pppoa or pppoe.....
> pppoa by the way stands for point to point protocol over atm and means that your dsl modem's port side facing your telco (telephone company) is sending atm packet info on an unpreassigned pathway through an atm network. This doesn't mean it isn't assigned a virtual path or virtual channel but that until it connects to the dslam (don't ask its short for dsl and then the asynchronous modulator, which is the otehr end of the dsl connection in the telco's central office) its pathway through the internal telco network (after the dslam towards the internet router) isn't pre-designated but gets assigned at time of connection. it does however get pre-assigned a vp (virtual path) and vc (virtual channel) ahead of time for the connection from the modem to the dslam.
>
> pppoe is point to point protocol over ethernet. and acts very similar to pppoa with the difference being that the internal vp / vc route through the telco's network is pre-assigned as it has to translate to a specific router which has your ip address info (can be dynamically assigned using login credentials, or static). pppoa differs in that it scans the atm network for the router with your static ip (if you program it so) or your logon credentials, and trys to locate the best pathway to that.
>
>
> obviously pppoe is faster and hence most telco's use it. however some smaller third parties with say only one router will use pppoa as it's easier to set up and maintain, and link through the telco's network.
>
>
> now on to your specific issue.........
>
>
> no you can't, and yes possibly you could.......
> you'd need a bridge machine with some server software installed for ip packet routing inbetween to manage it though. so from one p.c. no you can't use both easily (you can use them one at a time but would need to redo your network connection settings each time you switch), and definately not at the same time.
>
> with a server with ip network packet balancing features (win server 2k, win server 2003, linux, unix, solaris etc...) you could plug both into it and tell it to bridge the connections across the internal lan and to balance the load between the two.
>
>
>
> hope this helps
>
> and if you're using a pppoa usb modem..... don't
> inquire as to a pppoe lan ported modem and then with a more serious router you could connect both up and use specific ports for one isp connection (file sharing networks, ftp account etc...) and the other isp for other port duties (80 and 443 for web surfing, various for gamming etc....) with ethernet you could use both isp's with nothing more than a capable router inbetween and then split the jobs based on port requirements
>
> "Alon Brodski" wrote:
>
> > Hey!
> >
> > Thanks for your kind help!
> >
> > Well...I'm not sure what NAT is...may be you can explain? But about 172 and
> > 10 IP addresses...
> > I know that those are invalid Internet IP addresses.That's why I call them
> > internal ones, as opposed to external ones that are valid on the
> > Internet....
> > The reason why I get the 172 IP address is 'cos my PC is a part of LAN ,so
> > it gets it all the time.
> > So I was right that I CAN have both cable and ADSL connections on the same
> > PC...?
> > I don't plan to connect at the same time,but to have one connection going or
> > the other.
> > I have to use a VPN Dial Up Connection window to "dial" to my ISP.
> > So it's not like I get online automatically anyways....
> > And even if I was (like it happens in the US in case of cable modems from
> > what I heard) I could simply disable my NIC,period.
> > As far as network bandwith goes....T1 is what I have now from cable is
> > enough...I can even get 2 Mb ADSL connection through local TELCO (Bezeq).Not
> > sure if it's worth it....whether I would actually get exactly 2 Mb...
> > 'cos I do get them from the cable....
> > So I can have more than one VPN connecton going at the same time under XP?
> > So my PC would have one external IP address in PPP adapter in Windows (that
> > dial-up program that I use) and my NIC would have that 172 address from
> > cable and my modem would have 10 address from TELCO?
> >
> > Alon.
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > "Courtney" <a@b.c> wrote in message news:o KhEc.22735$wS2.1206@okepread03...
> > > Alon Brodski wrote:
> > > > Hello world!
> > > >
> > > > I have Windows XP Pro.
> > > >
> > > > I wonder if I could configure ONE computer to be connected to the
> > Internet
> > > > both using ADSL and CABLE.
> > > > Of course,not simultanously.Just to have 2 Dial Up Connections (not
> > > > analog,but PPP virtual ones) and use them one after another.
> > > > ONE-PPTP (VPN) for Cable modem connection and SECOND-,say,PPPoATM for
> > USB
> > > > ADSL modem connection.
> > > > I have a NIC and my cable modem is connected to it.It's LAN and I have
> > > > 172.2X.X.X IP address from cable Co. at all times and when I want to
> > connect
> > > > to the Internet I Dial to my ISP and get an external IP address from
> > > > it-80.179.X.X in my case...(each time it's different,naturally)-Open
> > Access
> > > > type.
> > > > I have USB port and I can get a USB ADSL modem and use a PPPoA type of
> > > > connection with it.
> > > > And to use the same ISP (whether with the same or not account with it-it
> > > > doesn't matter here)...
> > > >
> > > > The way I understand it-it should work OK...The unclear part is.....is
> > it
> > > > the NIC or the modem that gets 172.X.X.X address? In Cable....Some ppl
> > don't
> > > > have NIC's in their PC's...they use USB Cable modems...but they would
> > still
> > > > have that 172.X.X.X address...so it's not the NIC,but the modem who gets
> > > > it....or am I wrong?
> > > >
> > > > If I also have a USB ADSL modem,then that modem would get a 10.X.X.X IP
> > > > address from TELCO at all times
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > So the bottom line is....the way I get it....my Cable modem would
> > constantly
> > > > have that 172.X.X.X address from Cable Co ( same as my NIC).AND my ADSL
> > > > modem would constantly have 10.X.X.X address from TELCO.
> > > > Whenever I use a Dial Up PPTP VPN adapter it would get a 80.179.X.X
> > address
> > > > from my ISP and I would get on the Internet using cable
> > infrustructure.Then
> > > > I disconnect...Then I'll use a PPoA connection (the virtual adapter is
> > > > installed ,using a software that comes with the ADSL modem-Globespan ALE
> > > > series...) and I would get also 80.179.X.X address from ISP,using my
> > another
> > > > account with it (the ADSL one).
> > > >
> > > >
> > > Your request is kind of confusing...so here is my attmept at explaining
> > > what I think is going on.
> > >
> > > Cable: Regardless of how you connect, the cable modem itself never gets
> > > an IP address. The modem itself does not support the IP protocol. The
> > > first NIC it encounters, however, does get the IP address--whether it's
> > > an actual NIC or an XP-emulated one (via USB interface). The NIC,
> > > whatever type it is, will show up under Network Connections.
> > >
> > > DSL: In this case, the IP address is assigned at the head end, before it
> > > ever reaches your computer or your DSL modem. Like cable, if you connect
> > > via USB, the connection will again appear in Network Connections.
> > >
> > > Dial-Up: This works the same way as DSL; the IP address is assigned when
> > > you dial up, not at your end, but at the router you dial into. Once
> > > again, the modem will appear in Network Connections.
> > >
> > > Now you can have any one, or all three network connections going at the
> > > same time. You can also bridge any two (or all three) connections.
> > > (Highly not recommended on a commercial network.)
> > >
> > > Now, will you get an increase in network bandwidth by having multiple
> > > connections going? Nope. Remember that the distant end server will
> > > respond to the IP address that made the request, not all three, despite
> > > all the websites that have you making registry changes to do this.
> > >
> > > By the way, the following IP addresses are not routable over the
> > > Internet and are dropped by the first router they encounter:
> > >
> > > 10.0.0.0 - 10.255.255.255 (10/8 prefix)
> > > 172.16.0.0 - 172.31.255.255 (172.16/12 prefix)
> > > 192.168.0.0 - 192.168.255.255 (192.168/16 prefix)
> > >
> > >
> > > So, your 10.x.x.x and 172.x.x.x are not the IP addresses your service
> > > providers use to allow you to access the Internet. These are most likely
> > > NAT'd addresses.
> > >
> > > courtney sends....
> >
> >
> >
Anonymous
July 1, 2004 5:38:05 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Hey Dude!

Thanks for your help!

I probably don't have to physically unplug the cable modem if I can disable
it ,right?

What would be the point to have 2 VPN connections at once? The Cable (PPTP)
and ADSL (PPPoA)....if it wouldn't increase the bandwidth anyways and could
only interfere with one another...

When get online now my PC has 2 IP addresses -one is internal for cable
LAN-172 and another is external for the Internet in PPP dial up adapter
settings (the one that is dynamic).
I would assume that having a ADSL modem connected to my USB port and having
another internal IP address 10 wouldn't cause any problems,but if I wanted
to get online through ADSL simultanously with cable-,ie. to have 2 VPN
connections at once -PPTP and PPPoA...that I'm not sure if would work ...not
like I need it ,anyways...

I probably should call my Cable Co.'s support to ask about cable modem's IP
address :-) But to be honest,it doesn't really matter at this point....The
important part is that my NIC gets 172 IP address though that modem from my
cable Co.

I probably should learn more about ATM-PPPoA/PPPoE before I even TRY to
discuss it. :-)

To have a PPPoE kinda of ADSL connection I must use a NIC for it,'cos all
USB or PCI ADSL modems here are PPPoA.And here (Israel) I would say they
(PPPoA) are more common...Let alone we have only one TELCO here- a
monopol...I don't feel like buying another NIC...And to use same NIC for
both Cable and ADSL modems is probably is not too great....Unless I would be
connecting/disconnecting my cable modem all the time.Not sure if there's
such a thing as NIC Ethernet splitter.

Why would I have to redo my network connections each time if I would have 2
separate LANs? I.e. my cable modem NIC that has 172 address and USB ADSL 10
one....

I have no knowledge,nor money or time to learn about server OS's...

Well,may be I'll just try and see....

Thanks a lot!

Alon.





"the dude" <thedude@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:224469BF-7265-449C-955D-DB6C5202C421@microsoft.com...
> sorry didn't catch that you wanted to use each one at a time.....
>
> so with that, yes just unplug the cable modem and then reset the ip
address info to your p.c. by launching your pppoa "dial up" connection. or
......
>
> uncconect from the pppoa "dial up" connection and plug in your cable modem
and then, goto the start menu, click on "run"
>
> type cmd in the window provided and click the run button or just hit
enter.
>
> in the dos window type "ipconfig /renew /all"
>
> then afterwards just click the x in the top right to close the dos window
>
> "the dude" wrote:
>
> > not to be rude but please ignore courtney's post, it is full of erronous
info
> >
> > cable modem.....
> > does receive and retain an ip address, then assigns that ip to your
connected ethernet device acting as a nat (network address translation
router) it basically works like a bridge with the ip address on the wan (out
to cable company and internet) being assigned to the connected ethernet port
(your p.c., cable router etc...) the internal hardware / software in the
cable modem is designed to just forward the info between the two sides of
itself and to the outside world it looks as if your cable modem's ip address
is you and from your side it looks like your ip address is yours and the
cable modem is transparent.
> >
> >
> > dsl using pppoa or pppoe.....
> > pppoa by the way stands for point to point protocol over atm and means
that your dsl modem's port side facing your telco (telephone company) is
sending atm packet info on an unpreassigned pathway through an atm network.
This doesn't mean it isn't assigned a virtual path or virtual channel but
that until it connects to the dslam (don't ask its short for dsl and then
the asynchronous modulator, which is the otehr end of the dsl connection in
the telco's central office) its pathway through the internal telco network
(after the dslam towards the internet router) isn't pre-designated but gets
assigned at time of connection. it does however get pre-assigned a vp
(virtual path) and vc (virtual channel) ahead of time for the connection
from the modem to the dslam.
> >
> > pppoe is point to point protocol over ethernet. and acts very similar to
pppoa with the difference being that the internal vp / vc route through the
telco's network is pre-assigned as it has to translate to a specific router
which has your ip address info (can be dynamically assigned using login
credentials, or static). pppoa differs in that it scans the atm network for
the router with your static ip (if you program it so) or your logon
credentials, and trys to locate the best pathway to that.
> >
> >
> > obviously pppoe is faster and hence most telco's use it. however some
smaller third parties with say only one router will use pppoa as it's easier
to set up and maintain, and link through the telco's network.
> >
> >
> > now on to your specific issue.........
> >
> >
> > no you can't, and yes possibly you could.......
> > you'd need a bridge machine with some server software installed for ip
packet routing inbetween to manage it though. so from one p.c. no you can't
use both easily (you can use them one at a time but would need to redo your
network connection settings each time you switch), and definately not at the
same time.
> >
> > with a server with ip network packet balancing features (win server 2k,
win server 2003, linux, unix, solaris etc...) you could plug both into it
and tell it to bridge the connections across the internal lan and to balance
the load between the two.
> >
> >
> >
> > hope this helps
> >
> > and if you're using a pppoa usb modem..... don't
> > inquire as to a pppoe lan ported modem and then with a more serious
router you could connect both up and use specific ports for one isp
connection (file sharing networks, ftp account etc...) and the other isp for
other port duties (80 and 443 for web surfing, various for gamming etc....)
with ethernet you could use both isp's with nothing more than a capable
router inbetween and then split the jobs based on port requirements
> >
> > "Alon Brodski" wrote:
> >
> > > Hey!
> > >
> > > Thanks for your kind help!
> > >
> > > Well...I'm not sure what NAT is...may be you can explain? But about
172 and
> > > 10 IP addresses...
> > > I know that those are invalid Internet IP addresses.That's why I call
them
> > > internal ones, as opposed to external ones that are valid on the
> > > Internet....
> > > The reason why I get the 172 IP address is 'cos my PC is a part of LAN
,so
> > > it gets it all the time.
> > > So I was right that I CAN have both cable and ADSL connections on the
same
> > > PC...?
> > > I don't plan to connect at the same time,but to have one connection
going or
> > > the other.
> > > I have to use a VPN Dial Up Connection window to "dial" to my ISP.
> > > So it's not like I get online automatically anyways....
> > > And even if I was (like it happens in the US in case of cable modems
from
> > > what I heard) I could simply disable my NIC,period.
> > > As far as network bandwith goes....T1 is what I have now from cable is
> > > enough...I can even get 2 Mb ADSL connection through local TELCO
(Bezeq).Not
> > > sure if it's worth it....whether I would actually get exactly 2 Mb...
> > > 'cos I do get them from the cable....
> > > So I can have more than one VPN connecton going at the same time under
XP?
> > > So my PC would have one external IP address in PPP adapter in Windows
(that
> > > dial-up program that I use) and my NIC would have that 172 address
from
> > > cable and my modem would have 10 address from TELCO?
> > >
> > > Alon.
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > "Courtney" <a@b.c> wrote in message
news:o KhEc.22735$wS2.1206@okepread03...
> > > > Alon Brodski wrote:
> > > > > Hello world!
> > > > >
> > > > > I have Windows XP Pro.
> > > > >
> > > > > I wonder if I could configure ONE computer to be connected to the
> > > Internet
> > > > > both using ADSL and CABLE.
> > > > > Of course,not simultanously.Just to have 2 Dial Up Connections
(not
> > > > > analog,but PPP virtual ones) and use them one after another.
> > > > > ONE-PPTP (VPN) for Cable modem connection and SECOND-,say,PPPoATM
for
> > > USB
> > > > > ADSL modem connection.
> > > > > I have a NIC and my cable modem is connected to it.It's LAN and I
have
> > > > > 172.2X.X.X IP address from cable Co. at all times and when I want
to
> > > connect
> > > > > to the Internet I Dial to my ISP and get an external IP address
from
> > > > > it-80.179.X.X in my case...(each time it's
different,naturally)-Open
> > > Access
> > > > > type.
> > > > > I have USB port and I can get a USB ADSL modem and use a PPPoA
type of
> > > > > connection with it.
> > > > > And to use the same ISP (whether with the same or not account with
it-it
> > > > > doesn't matter here)...
> > > > >
> > > > > The way I understand it-it should work OK...The unclear part
is.....is
> > > it
> > > > > the NIC or the modem that gets 172.X.X.X address? In Cable....Some
ppl
> > > don't
> > > > > have NIC's in their PC's...they use USB Cable modems...but they
would
> > > still
> > > > > have that 172.X.X.X address...so it's not the NIC,but the modem
who gets
> > > > > it....or am I wrong?
> > > > >
> > > > > If I also have a USB ADSL modem,then that modem would get a
10.X.X.X IP
> > > > > address from TELCO at all times
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > > So the bottom line is....the way I get it....my Cable modem would
> > > constantly
> > > > > have that 172.X.X.X address from Cable Co ( same as my NIC).AND my
ADSL
> > > > > modem would constantly have 10.X.X.X address from TELCO.
> > > > > Whenever I use a Dial Up PPTP VPN adapter it would get a
80.179.X.X
> > > address
> > > > > from my ISP and I would get on the Internet using cable
> > > infrustructure.Then
> > > > > I disconnect...Then I'll use a PPoA connection (the virtual
adapter is
> > > > > installed ,using a software that comes with the ADSL
modem-Globespan ALE
> > > > > series...) and I would get also 80.179.X.X address from ISP,using
my
> > > another
> > > > > account with it (the ADSL one).
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > Your request is kind of confusing...so here is my attmept at
explaining
> > > > what I think is going on.
> > > >
> > > > Cable: Regardless of how you connect, the cable modem itself never
gets
> > > > an IP address. The modem itself does not support the IP protocol.
The
> > > > first NIC it encounters, however, does get the IP address--whether
it's
> > > > an actual NIC or an XP-emulated one (via USB interface). The NIC,
> > > > whatever type it is, will show up under Network Connections.
> > > >
> > > > DSL: In this case, the IP address is assigned at the head end,
before it
> > > > ever reaches your computer or your DSL modem. Like cable, if you
connect
> > > > via USB, the connection will again appear in Network Connections.
> > > >
> > > > Dial-Up: This works the same way as DSL; the IP address is assigned
when
> > > > you dial up, not at your end, but at the router you dial into. Once
> > > > again, the modem will appear in Network Connections.
> > > >
> > > > Now you can have any one, or all three network connections going at
the
> > > > same time. You can also bridge any two (or all three) connections.
> > > > (Highly not recommended on a commercial network.)
> > > >
> > > > Now, will you get an increase in network bandwidth by having
multiple
> > > > connections going? Nope. Remember that the distant end server will
> > > > respond to the IP address that made the request, not all three,
despite
> > > > all the websites that have you making registry changes to do this.
> > > >
> > > > By the way, the following IP addresses are not routable over the
> > > > Internet and are dropped by the first router they encounter:
> > > >
> > > > 10.0.0.0 - 10.255.255.255 (10/8 prefix)
> > > > 172.16.0.0 - 172.31.255.255 (172.16/12 prefix)
> > > > 192.168.0.0 - 192.168.255.255 (192.168/16 prefix)
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > So, your 10.x.x.x and 172.x.x.x are not the IP addresses your
service
> > > > providers use to allow you to access the Internet. These are most
likely
> > > > NAT'd addresses.
> > > >
> > > > courtney sends....
> > >
> > >
> > >
!