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"bench-testing" a motherboard outside of a case?

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Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
October 20, 2004 2:27:22 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

I want to build up a new system by working with the motherboard (on a
protected surface), with the power supply plugged in. Is this
practical, or do I need to have the motherboard connected to the
case's on/off switch?

Here is why I'm asking this question:

I want to test this system step by step, e.g. does the motherboard
"light up" when I apply power? When I insert the CPU and RAM, and
plug in a monitor, keyboard, and mouse, does it boot up?

I want to do this because I expect to be setting and resetting the
bridges on an AMD CPU as I experiment with different multipliers, etc.
(I have several unlocked CPUs in my parts bin.)

thanks,

--W--
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
October 20, 2004 7:08:49 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

Many do this all the time, including me.

I use a switch wired to a 2-pin connector to connect to and activate
the "power on" signal. At times I've used a small screwdriver to
short the 2 pins to power up a board, but one must use caution with
this technique, one slip of the hand and poof, all the magic smoke
might escape from some critical component.

A wooden board (piece of plywood 12" square) makes a nice insulator to
set the mobo on top of, or if you have no wood, a large magazine or a
couple of paper back books about 1/2-3/4" thick will suffice as the
vid card tab will extend below the surface of the mobo. Grounding
yourself to the PS case is important at all times. Good luck, have
fun.

--
Best regards,
Kyle
"Winey" <NOSPAMME@no-one-here.com> wrote in message
news:uitbn0hde2kgcnquldvobidrp0iuoe9ue3@4ax.com...
| I want to build up a new system by working with the motherboard (on
a
| protected surface), with the power supply plugged in. Is this
| practical, or do I need to have the motherboard connected to the
| case's on/off switch?
|
| Here is why I'm asking this question:
|
| I want to test this system step by step, e.g. does the motherboard
| "light up" when I apply power? When I insert the CPU and RAM, and
| plug in a monitor, keyboard, and mouse, does it boot up?
|
| I want to do this because I expect to be setting and resetting the
| bridges on an AMD CPU as I experiment with different multipliers,
etc.
| (I have several unlocked CPUs in my parts bin.)
|
| thanks,
|
| --W--
|
October 20, 2004 8:07:09 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

Kylesb wrote:

>Many do this all the time, including me.
>
>I use a switch wired to a 2-pin connector to connect to and activate
>the "power on" signal. At times I've used a small screwdriver to
>short the 2 pins to power up a board, but one must use caution with
>this technique, one slip of the hand and poof, all the magic smoke
>might escape from some critical component.
>
>A wooden board (piece of plywood 12" square) makes a nice insulator to
>set the mobo on top of, or if you have no wood, a large magazine or a
>couple of paper back books about 1/2-3/4" thick will suffice as the
>vid card tab will extend below the surface of the mobo. Grounding
>yourself to the PS case is important at all times. Good luck, have
>fun.
>
>
>
To solve the dilemma of the screwdriver slip, I just use one of those
little blue jumpers to make the momentary contact! Works great, just
don't leave it on or get the wrong 2 pins.
Rob
Related resources
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
October 21, 2004 4:03:13 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

On Wed, 20 Oct 2004 16:07:09 GMT, Rob <robc@insightbb.spambone.com>
wrote:

>Kylesb wrote:
>
>>Many do this all the time, including me.
>>
>>I use a switch wired to a 2-pin connector to connect to and activate
>>the "power on" signal. At times I've used a small screwdriver to
>>short the 2 pins to power up a board, but one must use caution with
>>this technique, one slip of the hand and poof, all the magic smoke
>>might escape from some critical component.
>>
>>A wooden board (piece of plywood 12" square) makes a nice insulator to
>>set the mobo on top of, or if you have no wood, a large magazine or a
>>couple of paper back books about 1/2-3/4" thick will suffice as the
>>vid card tab will extend below the surface of the mobo. Grounding
>>yourself to the PS case is important at all times. Good luck, have
>>fun.
>>
>>
>>
>To solve the dilemma of the screwdriver slip, I just use one of those
>little blue jumpers to make the momentary contact! Works great, just
>don't leave it on or get the wrong 2 pins.

Is it OK to simply leave the jumper in place, or would that somehow
confuse the motherboard?


>Rob
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
October 21, 2004 4:06:19 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

"Winey" <NOSPAMME@no-one-here.com> wrote in message
news:bonen0tbahpj194ls1eaedqp03jjkdor4t@4ax.com...
> On Wed, 20 Oct 2004 16:07:09 GMT, Rob <robc@insightbb.spambone.com>
> wrote:
>
> >Kylesb wrote:
> >
> >>Many do this all the time, including me.
> >>
> >>I use a switch wired to a 2-pin connector to connect to and activate
> >>the "power on" signal. At times I've used a small screwdriver to
> >>short the 2 pins to power up a board, but one must use caution with
> >>this technique, one slip of the hand and poof, all the magic smoke
> >>might escape from some critical component.
> >>
> >>A wooden board (piece of plywood 12" square) makes a nice insulator to
> >>set the mobo on top of, or if you have no wood, a large magazine or a
> >>couple of paper back books about 1/2-3/4" thick will suffice as the
> >>vid card tab will extend below the surface of the mobo. Grounding
> >>yourself to the PS case is important at all times. Good luck, have
> >>fun.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >To solve the dilemma of the screwdriver slip, I just use one of those
> >little blue jumpers to make the momentary contact! Works great, just
> >don't leave it on or get the wrong 2 pins.
>
> Is it OK to simply leave the jumper in place, or would that somehow
> confuse the motherboard?
> >Rob

The switch is just a shorting mechanism. As long as you connect the
correct 2 pins you can leave is on as long as you like, assuming the
switch works properly and isn't permanently shorted.

charles.....
October 21, 2004 9:44:01 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

Winey wrote:

>On Wed, 20 Oct 2004 16:07:09 GMT, Rob <robc@insightbb.spambone.com>
>wrote:
>
>
>
>>Kylesb wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>>>Many do this all the time, including me.
>>>
>>>I use a switch wired to a 2-pin connector to connect to and activate
>>>the "power on" signal. At times I've used a small screwdriver to
>>>short the 2 pins to power up a board, but one must use caution with
>>>this technique, one slip of the hand and poof, all the magic smoke
>>>might escape from some critical component.
>>>
>>>A wooden board (piece of plywood 12" square) makes a nice insulator to
>>>set the mobo on top of, or if you have no wood, a large magazine or a
>>>couple of paper back books about 1/2-3/4" thick will suffice as the
>>>vid card tab will extend below the surface of the mobo. Grounding
>>>yourself to the PS case is important at all times. Good luck, have
>>>fun.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>To solve the dilemma of the screwdriver slip, I just use one of those
>>little blue jumpers to make the momentary contact! Works great, just
>>don't leave it on or get the wrong 2 pins.
>>
>>
>
>Is it OK to simply leave the jumper in place, or would that somehow
>confuse the motherboard?
>
>
>
>
>>Rob
>>
>>
>
>
>
Winey,
The key, regardless of weather you use a screwdriver, a Jumper (as I
do), or a push button switch wired to jacks that slip over the pins, is
to have a momentary contact. A continuous shorting is equal to a stuck
case switch, that has caused many a variety of undesirable symptoms!
Rob
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
October 22, 2004 2:55:43 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

On Thu, 21 Oct 2004 17:44:01 GMT, Rob <robc@insightbb.spambone.com>
wrote:

>Winey wrote:
>
>>On Wed, 20 Oct 2004 16:07:09 GMT, Rob <robc@insightbb.spambone.com>
>>wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>>>Kylesb wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>>Many do this all the time, including me.
>>>>
>>>>I use a switch wired to a 2-pin connector to connect to and activate
>>>>the "power on" signal. At times I've used a small screwdriver to
>>>>short the 2 pins to power up a board, but one must use caution with
>>>>this technique, one slip of the hand and poof, all the magic smoke
>>>>might escape from some critical component.
>>>>
>>>>A wooden board (piece of plywood 12" square) makes a nice insulator to
>>>>set the mobo on top of, or if you have no wood, a large magazine or a
>>>>couple of paper back books about 1/2-3/4" thick will suffice as the
>>>>vid card tab will extend below the surface of the mobo. Grounding
>>>>yourself to the PS case is important at all times. Good luck, have
>>>>fun.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>To solve the dilemma of the screwdriver slip, I just use one of those
>>>little blue jumpers to make the momentary contact! Works great, just
>>>don't leave it on or get the wrong 2 pins.
>>>
>>>
>>
>>Is it OK to simply leave the jumper in place, or would that somehow
>>confuse the motherboard?
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>>Rob
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>Winey,
>The key, regardless of weather you use a screwdriver, a Jumper (as I
>do), or a push button switch wired to jacks that slip over the pins, is
>to have a momentary contact. A continuous shorting is equal to a stuck
>case switch, that has caused many a variety of undesirable symptoms!
>Rob

Thanks to all who replied. Now I know exactly what to do. All I need
now is the block of free time. :) 

--W--
!