Pantone PrintFix vs Epson 2100 Gray Balancer

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I'm conscious that I need to run the Epson Gray Balancer on my Epson
2100, but I'm also thinking of getting a Pantone SpyderPRO™ plus a
PrintFIX™ in order to profile my monitor and printer.

My question is, how good is the Pantone system at getting a neutral
gray balance? I'd expect quite good, but I've not seen anything to
confirm this. I don't see the point in coming to terms with the
complexity of the gray balancer sofware if the Pantone system will do
it all for me much more easily.

Sorry if this is a dumb question.

Brian
3 answers Last reply
More about pantone printfix epson 2100 gray balancer
  1. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Hey Brian,

    I've been using a dual Sony Trinitron system for over three years now and
    just bought a Pantone SpyderPro to finally get them calibrated together. One
    of the monitors has had a blue cast forever and it's great to finally get
    them to display the same colours in the same images.

    The next step is to setup profiles for my printers, so I can't really answer
    your question, just wanted to let you know that so-far I'm really happy with
    the SpyderPro. It did a much better job than my previous attempts at
    eyeballing corrections with PowerStrip.
    --

    Regards,

    Eddie Trimarchi
    ~~~~~~~~~~~
    http://www.astroshed.com
    http://www.fitsplug.com

    "Brian Downunda" <brian_downunda@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:6fdce5e4.0405050826.59f932f8@posting.google.com...
    > I'm conscious that I need to run the Epson Gray Balancer on my Epson
    > 2100, but I'm also thinking of getting a Pantone SpyderPROT plus a
    > PrintFIXT in order to profile my monitor and printer.
    >
    > My question is, how good is the Pantone system at getting a neutral
    > gray balance? I'd expect quite good, but I've not seen anything to
    > confirm this. I don't see the point in coming to terms with the
    > complexity of the gray balancer sofware if the Pantone system will do
    > it all for me much more easily.
    >
    > Sorry if this is a dumb question.
    >
    > Brian
  2. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On 5 May 2004 09:26:44 -0700, brian_downunda@yahoo.com (Brian
    Downunda) wrote:

    >I'm conscious that I need to run the Epson Gray Balancer on my Epson
    >2100, but I'm also thinking of getting a Pantone SpyderPRO™ plus a
    >PrintFIX™ in order to profile my monitor and printer.
    >
    >My question is, how good is the Pantone system at getting a neutral
    >gray balance? I'd expect quite good, but I've not seen anything to
    >confirm this. I don't see the point in coming to terms with the
    >complexity of the gray balancer sofware if the Pantone system will do
    >it all for me much more easily.
    >
    >Sorry if this is a dumb question.
    >
    >Brian

    Not a dumb question at all, although, if you look a little closer at
    the Colorvision site, I think they indicate it is mainly for color
    work, and not grayscale. I had access to one of their other
    inexpensive printer profiling products, Profiler Plus, which works on
    a similar principal, with the difference being you use your own
    scanner, and the results were terrible for greyscale. With some
    tweeking, I was able to produce a color profile that was marginally
    better than the stock Epson 2200 'canned' profiles.

    A Google search indicates my results are more typical than unusual.

    Despite the less than exciting results, I'm not certain I can lay all
    of the blame at Colorvisions feet. Printing near neutral B&W from 5
    colors + black is no easy task, especially when still going through
    Epsons print driver. It wouldn't be hard to believe that Epson
    optimized its driver for color, not B&W, print quality. There are
    third party RIPs (that is short for Raster Image Processors) that are
    "replacements" for Epson's drivers. Basically, these are industrial
    grade, production house tools and allow the user to control the
    printer to a far higher degree than most would image. They also have
    industrial grade prices to match.

    The most promising solution, if you are really into grayscale output,
    is quadtone, or heptone printing. Basically, the color cartrige gets
    replaced with a 'shades of gray' cartrige. Look at Cone Editions and
    Generartions Inks for more details. Some of the output that I have
    seen is truly spectacular. Again, not real cheap, but reasonable
    enough to consider if B&W pushes your buttons. I'm not there yet, but
    it looks like where I will be heading in the next sixth months.

    All that said, their Spyder and monitor profiling solutions work, and
    work well.

    David Glos
  3. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Just a quick followup to my reply.

    Check out the following link:

    http://www.inksupply.com/index.cfm?source=html/ut7_2200.html#utc

    It looks like MIS Associates finally has their UT7 ink set out for the
    Epson 2200. If it works as inidicated, this could be a nice deal for
    monochrome output on the Epson. Realize of course, it is not WYSIWYG.
    You start with a grayscale file, convert it to RGB, then apply an
    adjustment curve. Then cool thing is one cartrige set can ouput
    everything from sepia-to-neutral-to-cool tone.

    Hope that gives you some ideas.

    David Glos
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