A7V400-MX 2600+ 266 appears to be running half speed

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

I have a brand new Asus A7v400-MX with a brand new Athlon 2600+ 266
bus speed. Unfortunately, I can't seem to get the CPU to register at
full speed. What might be going on?
I'm using PC2100 memory. I've got the DIP switches set to 133mhz.
But, everywhere the CPU shows up as 1066mhz. I'm completely stumped.
--Mike
8 answers Last reply
More about a7v400 2600 appears running half speed
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <7304149d.0412022117.aabb955@posting.google.com>,
    mtmedlin@gmail.com (Mike M.) wrote:

    > I have a brand new Asus A7v400-MX with a brand new Athlon 2600+ 266
    > bus speed. Unfortunately, I can't seem to get the CPU to register at
    > full speed. What might be going on?
    > I'm using PC2100 memory. I've got the DIP switches set to 133mhz.
    > But, everywhere the CPU shows up as 1066mhz. I'm completely stumped.
    > --Mike

    There was a warning in this group a while ago, about the paper manual
    that comes with the product. Download the manual and look at page 23
    for the DSW information. Trying the settings from the PDF manual
    may fix your problem.

    (the warning)
    http://groups.google.com/groups?threadm=443fc97.0411081040.c069fd2%40posting.google.com

    (the manual)
    http://www.asus.com.tw/pub/ASUS/mb/socka/km400a/a7v400-mx/e1817_a7v400-mx.pdf

    That info doesn't affect your results. It could be, you've mixed up
    the "ON" and "OFF" settings on the switch. You should go
    by the "ON" and "OFF" status of each switch position, and match
    the ON/OFF state shown in the manual, with the board.

    HTH,
    Paul
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    > There was a warning in this group a while ago, about the paper manual
    > that comes with the product. Download the manual and look at page 23
    > for the DSW information. Trying the settings from the PDF manual
    > may fix your problem.
    > That info doesn't affect your results. It could be, you've mixed up
    > the "ON" and "OFF" settings on the switch. You should go
    > by the "ON" and "OFF" status of each switch position, and match
    > the ON/OFF state shown in the manual, with the board.
    >
    > HTH,
    > Paul


    Thanks, Paul.
    Unfortunately, the 133 setting is the same on both versions. Plus, I
    had considered that perhaps I was mis-reading the switch position in
    the manual, so I tried the opposite pattern. That results in no boot.
    I can successfully set the DIP switches to 100mhz and that results in
    an 800 reading. And the memory is always correctly identifying itself
    as DDR226 on the POST screen.
    I've updated to v1006 BIOS. I've fiddled with the DIP switches. This
    mobo is in one of those Antec Aria cases, so things are really
    cramped. (It looked like everything was working, so I had completed
    the install of everything. It was only later I noticed it was
    reporting itself as a 1066mhz CPU.) I guess my next step is to pull
    out the CPU and put in a 2000+ 266 to see what sort of results it
    generates.
    I haven't run into this sort of problem since the old days when DIP
    switches were the norm for configuring a CPU on the old socket 7
    motherboards. It seems there's got to be an easy answer to this.
    I've scoured the manual (printed and online) looking for some other
    jumper or BIOS setting I may be missing, and nothing has worked so
    far.
    Further guesses or input are appreciated, though. I really don't want
    to have to disassemble this thing.
    --Mike
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    I have the same mb only with a 2000+. The dip switch diagram is
    confusing sometimes, and the switches are finnicky (ie they have to be
    all the off or on). I had a problem with that too, and found that the
    no. 3 switch wasn't fully going into position. I pushed it a *little*
    harder, and voila! it worked!

    Just to clarify...
    You do have your dip as follows?
    1=off
    2=on
    3=off
    4=on
    5=off

    If this doesn't remedy it, I would look into another mb... the switch
    could be faulty?

    Hope this helps

    Mike M. wrote:
    >>There was a warning in this group a while ago, about the paper manual
    >>that comes with the product. Download the manual and look at page 23
    >>for the DSW information. Trying the settings from the PDF manual
    >>may fix your problem.
    >>That info doesn't affect your results. It could be, you've mixed up
    >>the "ON" and "OFF" settings on the switch. You should go
    >>by the "ON" and "OFF" status of each switch position, and match
    >>the ON/OFF state shown in the manual, with the board.
    >>
    >>HTH,
    >> Paul
    >
    >
    >
    > Thanks, Paul.
    > Unfortunately, the 133 setting is the same on both versions. Plus, I
    > had considered that perhaps I was mis-reading the switch position in
    > the manual, so I tried the opposite pattern. That results in no boot.
    > I can successfully set the DIP switches to 100mhz and that results in
    > an 800 reading. And the memory is always correctly identifying itself
    > as DDR226 on the POST screen.
    > I've updated to v1006 BIOS. I've fiddled with the DIP switches. This
    > mobo is in one of those Antec Aria cases, so things are really
    > cramped. (It looked like everything was working, so I had completed
    > the install of everything. It was only later I noticed it was
    > reporting itself as a 1066mhz CPU.) I guess my next step is to pull
    > out the CPU and put in a 2000+ 266 to see what sort of results it
    > generates.
    > I haven't run into this sort of problem since the old days when DIP
    > switches were the norm for configuring a CPU on the old socket 7
    > motherboards. It seems there's got to be an easy answer to this.
    > I've scoured the manual (printed and online) looking for some other
    > jumper or BIOS setting I may be missing, and nothing has worked so
    > far.
    > Further guesses or input are appreciated, though. I really don't want
    > to have to disassemble this thing.
    > --Mike
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <7304149d.0412030937.5c44d880@posting.google.com>,
    mtmedlin@gmail.com (Mike M.) wrote:

    > > There was a warning in this group a while ago, about the paper manual
    > > that comes with the product. Download the manual and look at page 23
    > > for the DSW information. Trying the settings from the PDF manual
    > > may fix your problem.
    > > That info doesn't affect your results. It could be, you've mixed up
    > > the "ON" and "OFF" settings on the switch. You should go
    > > by the "ON" and "OFF" status of each switch position, and match
    > > the ON/OFF state shown in the manual, with the board.
    > >
    > > HTH,
    > > Paul
    >
    >
    > Thanks, Paul.
    > Unfortunately, the 133 setting is the same on both versions. Plus, I
    > had considered that perhaps I was mis-reading the switch position in
    > the manual, so I tried the opposite pattern. That results in no boot.
    > I can successfully set the DIP switches to 100mhz and that results in
    > an 800 reading. And the memory is always correctly identifying itself
    > as DDR226 on the POST screen.
    > I've updated to v1006 BIOS. I've fiddled with the DIP switches. This
    > mobo is in one of those Antec Aria cases, so things are really
    > cramped. (It looked like everything was working, so I had completed
    > the install of everything. It was only later I noticed it was
    > reporting itself as a 1066mhz CPU.) I guess my next step is to pull
    > out the CPU and put in a 2000+ 266 to see what sort of results it
    > generates.
    > I haven't run into this sort of problem since the old days when DIP
    > switches were the norm for configuring a CPU on the old socket 7
    > motherboards. It seems there's got to be an easy answer to this.
    > I've scoured the manual (printed and online) looking for some other
    > jumper or BIOS setting I may be missing, and nothing has worked so
    > far.
    > Further guesses or input are appreciated, though. I really don't want
    > to have to disassemble this thing.
    > --Mike

    Another thought that occurs to me, is perhaps you bought a Mobile
    Barton 2600 XP-M ? The default multiplier will be pretty low on
    that.

    See table entitled "Thoroughbred FSB:133" half way down the page:

    http://fab51.com/cpu/barton/athlon-e23.html

    You could be running at 133MHz and a 6X multiplier.

    Since the A7V400-MX is using a DSW to set the frequency, it could
    be that the board doesn't have programmable frequency/multiplier
    control. That takes either some General Purpose I/O (GPIO) pins
    or it takes an "overclock control chip", to set logic levels
    on the multiplier signals of the socket. In any case, I don't see
    any multiplier option settings in the BIOS for the board.

    If it is a mobile version of processor, and you really want to
    use it in that board, this page has some info on how to either
    mod the bridges on the top of the chip itself, or to mod the
    bottom of the processor socket. The bridges set logic levels
    on some configuration pins on the bottom of the processor, and
    a user may exert control, either by modding the bridges or
    by changing the logic level at the bottom of the chip.
    Originally, I had considered the bottom of the socket to be
    the easier mod, but if the socket has no excess pin length
    on it, it can be hard to attach wires to do the job. Using
    "wire tricks" shoved into the socket holes is another option,
    but I don't consider that to be too easy or reliable.

    http://www.ocinside.de/go_e.html?/html/workshop/pinmod/amd_pinmod.html

    If you pull down the "Multiplier Selection" menu, and select "16 x FSB",
    that would give you 2133MHz when the DIP switch is set to 133MHz.
    That is equivalent to a Thoroughbred 2600+ , but of course the
    model number reported by any utility should say Barton, as the core
    is likely a Barton core. (Actually, with a Barton core, the bus can
    run at 200MHz, and I run my 2600+ XP-M at 200x11 or 2100MHz, which
    is a pretty gentle overclock. Whether a setting like this will
    work reliably, may depend on how much Vcore the chip is getting,
    and if the board doesn't have a Vcore setting either, then that
    would be another job for jumpering...)

    The "jumpers" shown on the socket, on the ocinside web page, show
    you what signals need to change, to get a different multiplier.
    Settings like this are a convenient BIOS setting on other boards,
    and microATX boards are notorious for not having necessary settings.

    I put a table of values for AthlonXP here:
    http://groups.google.ca/groups?selm=nospam-2811041527420001%40192.168.1.177

    Hope that gives you a few hints,
    Paul
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Wow... Paul, that's a lot of info! Thank you much.
    Here's what I know... Althought I bought and paid for a Athlon 2600+
    266FSB, I decided it was time to actually take the heat sink off and
    see what this CPU realy was. Here's the code...
    AXDA2600DKV3CF368.... I couldn't read the rest. One or two of those
    numbers/letters may be off -- it's awfully hard to read them.
    According to some really quick searches, it appears I do have a Barton
    333. Does that sound about right?
    Anyway, I haven't had time to investigate exactly what I need to do to
    the CPU clock settings to get this to work. I quickly reviewed some
    of the links you provided, but will have to try to digest this some
    time in the future.
    I guess I'll keep the CPU. It's something more than what I paid for,
    but it seems some people have "issues" with Barton -- still not sure
    what that's all about.
    Thanks for all the help.
    --Mike


    >
    > Another thought that occurs to me, is perhaps you bought a Mobile
    > Barton 2600 XP-M ? The default multiplier will be pretty low on
    > that.
    >
    > See table entitled "Thoroughbred FSB:133" half way down the page:
    >
    > http://fab51.com/cpu/barton/athlon-e23.html
    >
    > You could be running at 133MHz and a 6X multiplier.
    >
    > Since the A7V400-MX is using a DSW to set the frequency, it could
    > be that the board doesn't have programmable frequency/multiplier
    > control. That takes either some General Purpose I/O (GPIO) pins
    > or it takes an "overclock control chip", to set logic levels
    > on the multiplier signals of the socket. In any case, I don't see
    > any multiplier option settings in the BIOS for the board.
    >
    > If it is a mobile version of processor, and you really want to
    > use it in that board, this page has some info on how to either
    > mod the bridges on the top of the chip itself, or to mod the
    > bottom of the processor socket. The bridges set logic levels
    > on some configuration pins on the bottom of the processor, and
    > a user may exert control, either by modding the bridges or
    > by changing the logic level at the bottom of the chip.
    > Originally, I had considered the bottom of the socket to be
    > the easier mod, but if the socket has no excess pin length
    > on it, it can be hard to attach wires to do the job. Using
    > "wire tricks" shoved into the socket holes is another option,
    > but I don't consider that to be too easy or reliable.
    >
    > http://www.ocinside.de/go_e.html?/html/workshop/pinmod/amd_pinmod.html
    >
    > If you pull down the "Multiplier Selection" menu, and select "16 x FSB",
    > that would give you 2133MHz when the DIP switch is set to 133MHz.
    > That is equivalent to a Thoroughbred 2600+ , but of course the
    > model number reported by any utility should say Barton, as the core
    > is likely a Barton core. (Actually, with a Barton core, the bus can
    > run at 200MHz, and I run my 2600+ XP-M at 200x11 or 2100MHz, which
    > is a pretty gentle overclock. Whether a setting like this will
    > work reliably, may depend on how much Vcore the chip is getting,
    > and if the board doesn't have a Vcore setting either, then that
    > would be another job for jumpering...)
    >
    > The "jumpers" shown on the socket, on the ocinside web page, show
    > you what signals need to change, to get a different multiplier.
    > Settings like this are a convenient BIOS setting on other boards,
    > and microATX boards are notorious for not having necessary settings.
    >
    > I put a table of values for AthlonXP here:
    > http://groups.google.ca/groups?selm=nospam-2811041527420001%40192.168.1.177
    >
    > Hope that gives you a few hints,
    > Paul
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Ignore that previous post.
    I realize now that the CPU is indeed a Thoroughbred 266 and not
    Barton. I hadn't looked far enough down on the OPN. I had looked for
    this page, http://www.amdboard.com/amdid.html, but for whatever reason
    couldn't locate it.
    Anyway, I've given up on the 2600+. I put a Palomino 2000+ in the
    Asus motherboard and it works, so I'm moving on. Hopefully I can get
    the 2600+ to work in another system. If not, I guess I'll have to
    return it. Glad I got that extended warranty on it.
    Anyway, thanks all for your help.
    --Mike
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    On 4 Dec 2004 13:02:48 -0800, mtmedlin@gmail.com (Mike M.) wrote:

    <snip>
    >see what this CPU realy was. Here's the code...
    >AXDA2600DKV3CF368.... I couldn't read the rest. One or two of those
    >numbers/letters may be off -- it's awfully hard to read them.
    >According to some really quick searches, it appears I do have a Barton
    >333. Does that sound about right?
    <snip>

    A "AXDA2600DKV3C" would be a 266 FSB T-Bred.
    Set FSB to 133 and CPU multiple to 16 if setting manually.

    ____OPN________Core___Model__MHz___FSB x Mult_
    AXDA2600DKV3C T-Bred 2600+ 2133 133 x 16.0
    AXDA2600DKV4D Barton 2600+ 1917 166 x 11.5
    AXDA2600DKV3D T-Bred 2600+ 2083 166 x 12.5

    hth,
    Ed
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <7304149d.0412041302.44f3fd27@posting.google.com>,
    mtmedlin@gmail.com (Mike M.) wrote:

    > Wow... Paul, that's a lot of info! Thank you much.
    > Here's what I know... Althought I bought and paid for a Athlon 2600+
    > 266FSB, I decided it was time to actually take the heat sink off and
    > see what this CPU realy was. Here's the code...
    > AXDA2600DKV3CF368.... I couldn't read the rest. One or two of those
    > numbers/letters may be off -- it's awfully hard to read them.
    > According to some really quick searches, it appears I do have a Barton
    > 333. Does that sound about right?
    > Anyway, I haven't had time to investigate exactly what I need to do to
    > the CPU clock settings to get this to work. I quickly reviewed some
    > of the links you provided, but will have to try to digest this some
    > time in the future.
    > I guess I'll keep the CPU. It's something more than what I paid for,
    > but it seems some people have "issues" with Barton -- still not sure
    > what that's all about.
    > Thanks for all the help.
    > --Mike

    Well, Ed says you got what you paid for. A T-Bred 2600+
    with 133x16. Get a copy of CPUID, and verify the clock
    information.

    http://www.cpuid.com/cpuz

    That tool should also report whether the model is a
    T-Bred or not. Post back what you find.

    There are other tools that give info about a board, like
    Everest from lavalys and Sandra from sisoftware. But CPUZ
    should be short and to the point.

    Paul

    >
    >
    > >
    > > Another thought that occurs to me, is perhaps you bought a Mobile
    > > Barton 2600 XP-M ? The default multiplier will be pretty low on
    > > that.
    > >
    > > See table entitled "Thoroughbred FSB:133" half way down the page:
    > >
    > > http://fab51.com/cpu/barton/athlon-e23.html
    > >
    > > You could be running at 133MHz and a 6X multiplier.
    > >
    > > Since the A7V400-MX is using a DSW to set the frequency, it could
    > > be that the board doesn't have programmable frequency/multiplier
    > > control. That takes either some General Purpose I/O (GPIO) pins
    > > or it takes an "overclock control chip", to set logic levels
    > > on the multiplier signals of the socket. In any case, I don't see
    > > any multiplier option settings in the BIOS for the board.
    > >
    > > If it is a mobile version of processor, and you really want to
    > > use it in that board, this page has some info on how to either
    > > mod the bridges on the top of the chip itself, or to mod the
    > > bottom of the processor socket. The bridges set logic levels
    > > on some configuration pins on the bottom of the processor, and
    > > a user may exert control, either by modding the bridges or
    > > by changing the logic level at the bottom of the chip.
    > > Originally, I had considered the bottom of the socket to be
    > > the easier mod, but if the socket has no excess pin length
    > > on it, it can be hard to attach wires to do the job. Using
    > > "wire tricks" shoved into the socket holes is another option,
    > > but I don't consider that to be too easy or reliable.
    > >
    > > http://www.ocinside.de/go_e.html?/html/workshop/pinmod/amd_pinmod.html
    > >
    > > If you pull down the "Multiplier Selection" menu, and select "16 x FSB",
    > > that would give you 2133MHz when the DIP switch is set to 133MHz.
    > > That is equivalent to a Thoroughbred 2600+ , but of course the
    > > model number reported by any utility should say Barton, as the core
    > > is likely a Barton core. (Actually, with a Barton core, the bus can
    > > run at 200MHz, and I run my 2600+ XP-M at 200x11 or 2100MHz, which
    > > is a pretty gentle overclock. Whether a setting like this will
    > > work reliably, may depend on how much Vcore the chip is getting,
    > > and if the board doesn't have a Vcore setting either, then that
    > > would be another job for jumpering...)
    > >
    > > The "jumpers" shown on the socket, on the ocinside web page, show
    > > you what signals need to change, to get a different multiplier.
    > > Settings like this are a convenient BIOS setting on other boards,
    > > and microATX boards are notorious for not having necessary settings.
    > >
    > > I put a table of values for AthlonXP here:
    > > http://groups.google.ca/groups?selm=nospam-2811041527420001%40192.168.1.177
    > >
    > > Hope that gives you a few hints,
    > > Paul
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