Asus A8N-SLi Deluxe nForce4 SLi (Socket 939) PCI-Express M..

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

I am quite keen on ordering this new mobo from ASUS (PCI Express for AMD
proc.) and was wondering whether someone with knowledge and experience in PC
building could comment on how risky it is to buy a rather new mobo.
I have looked at the ASUS site and they still do not have any documentation
apart from two BIOS recently posted.

Thank you in advance for your help!

Cheers,
Jordan
5 answers Last reply
More about asus deluxe nforce4 socket express
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    On Fri, 3 Dec 2004 20:38:12 -0000, "Jordan Petkov"
    <jordan.petkov1@tiscali.co.uk> wrote:

    >I am quite keen on ordering this new mobo from ASUS (PCI Express for AMD
    >proc.) and was wondering whether someone with knowledge and experience in PC
    >building could comment on how risky it is to buy a rather new mobo.
    >I have looked at the ASUS site and they still do not have any documentation
    >apart from two BIOS recently posted.
    >
    >Thank you in advance for your help!
    >
    >Cheers,
    >Jordan
    >

    Buying the first revisions (1.00, 1.01) of any board is risky if you ask
    me, seems to me there is always a bug or two that needs fixing in the
    early revisions, I'd at least wait and see what the early adopters,
    reviewers are saying about the board.

    I always seem to buy revision 1.03 or later boards, no problems here. ;p

    Ed
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Typical ASUS,they dont even have the board out yet and there are 2 bios's for
    it. Asus has the worst bios of any board,they can never get one to work
    right,you have to use the one with the least issues.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    "Ed" <not@here.com> wrote in message
    news:mpl1r0929v4po1aajum6i7scp2vipg14tl@4ax.com...
    > On Fri, 3 Dec 2004 20:38:12 -0000, "Jordan Petkov"
    > <jordan.petkov1@tiscali.co.uk> wrote:
    >
    > >I am quite keen on ordering this new mobo from ASUS (PCI Express for AMD
    > >proc.) and was wondering whether someone with knowledge and experience in
    PC
    > >building could comment on how risky it is to buy a rather new mobo.
    > >I have looked at the ASUS site and they still do not have any
    documentation
    > >apart from two BIOS recently posted.
    > >
    > >Thank you in advance for your help!
    > >
    > >Cheers,
    > >Jordan
    > >
    >
    > Buying the first revisions (1.00, 1.01) of any board is risky if you ask
    > me, seems to me there is always a bug or two that needs fixing in the
    > early revisions, I'd at least wait and see what the early adopters,
    > reviewers are saying about the board.
    >
    > I always seem to buy revision 1.03 or later boards, no problems here. ;p
    >
    > Ed
    >

    Thanks for your explanations. I could not agree more, however tempting it is
    to get a SLI motherboard it is still too risky to jump in.
    The only review I have seen is this one:

    http://www.pcper.com/article.php?aid=98&type=expert&pid=2

    As I am first-time builder and do not have much experience does ever happen
    that one is able to exchange a faulty mobo due to the manufacturer? How easy
    could this be?

    Cheers,
    Jordan
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Jordan Petkov wrote:
    > I am quite keen on ordering this new mobo from ASUS (PCI Express for AMD
    > proc.) and was wondering whether someone with knowledge and experience in PC
    > building could comment on how risky it is to buy a rather new mobo.
    > I have looked at the ASUS site and they still do not have any documentation
    > apart from two BIOS recently posted.

    The problem with getting a new toy that has just been invented is that
    it simply isn't "tried and tested" to the extent that all minor
    design-flaws and bugs have been eliminated, or that later revisions will
    come with a better support for newer hardware.

    If you want a rock-stable system that boots every time you press the
    button, and doesn't fail, get a board that has been on the market a few
    months. You'll most likely get a newer revision of the board than the
    one that first came out.

    If you want the latest of the latest, buy it knowing you might encounter
    some problems along the way, be it crashes, not booting, some hardware
    not working or anything else you can think of with a mobo. Fixes in the
    form of bios-updates may come, but some things can only be fixed by
    changing parts - and thus creating a new revision of the board.

    I can't tell you how many problems the ASUS A8N-SLI might give. But the
    chances you'll run into problems are far greater than with boards that
    have been on the market for some time.
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    On Fri, 3 Dec 2004 21:56:39 -0000, "Jordan Petkov"
    <jordan.petkov1@tiscali.co.uk> wrote:

    >Thanks for your explanations. I could not agree more, however tempting it is
    >to get a SLI motherboard it is still too risky to jump in.
    >The only review I have seen is this one:
    >
    >http://www.pcper.com/article.php?aid=98&type=expert&pid=2
    >
    >As I am first-time builder and do not have much experience does ever happen
    >that one is able to exchange a faulty mobo due to the manufacturer? How easy
    >could this be?
    >
    >Cheers,
    >Jordan
    >

    There is always a chance you get a dud, read the vendors exchange/return
    policy, after that you have to deal with Asus or whoever. I've been
    buying parts from Newegg for the last couple years without any problems.

    Ed
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