How to connect SCSI HDD to home PC?

Archived from groups: jaring.pcbase,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

How do you conect a SCSI hard disk to a normal
( Asus P4 2.4 Ghz - 1 Gb DDR ) home PC ? Is there
any real advantage in using SCSI instead of the
normal IDE?
Do I have to get some special interface card and
is it expensive?
The drive was received as a gift and is a Seagate
Cheetah 10 K-rpm 37Gb.
Any advise is very appreciated as I don't know much
about computers ......
TIA
5 answers Last reply
More about connect scsi home
  1. Archived from groups: jaring.pcbase,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Adaptec SCSI controller. They are not too expensive, but not cheap.

    SCSI is faster than IDE.
    Wide SCSI controllers can drive upto 15 hard disks per SCSI channel.
    SCSI hard disks can work at the same time. IDE work in a master-slave relation per SCSI
    channel
    SCSI easily supports RAID 5, at best you can do RAID 0/1 with IDE

    http://www.adaptec.com/


    --
    Dave


    "Zul" <zulkifli_555@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:arntt0digkb2d52hssek55h2qs4iugddkn@4ax.com...
    |
    | How do you conect a SCSI hard disk to a normal
    | ( Asus P4 2.4 Ghz - 1 Gb DDR ) home PC ? Is there
    | any real advantage in using SCSI instead of the
    | normal IDE?
    | Do I have to get some special interface card and
    | is it expensive?
    | The drive was received as a gift and is a Seagate
    | Cheetah 10 K-rpm 37Gb.
    | Any advise is very appreciated as I don't know much
    | about computers ......
    | TIA
    |
  2. Archived from groups: jaring.pcbase,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Zul wrote:
    > How do you conect a SCSI hard disk to a normal
    > ( Asus P4 2.4 Ghz - 1 Gb DDR ) home PC ? Is there
    > any real advantage in using SCSI instead of the
    > normal IDE?
    > Do I have to get some special interface card and
    > is it expensive?
    > The drive was received as a gift and is a Seagate
    > Cheetah 10 K-rpm 37Gb.
    > Any advise is very appreciated as I don't know much
    > about computers ......
    > TIA
    >

    You'll need a SCSI controller card - those tend to be relatively
    expensive by home PC standards these days.

    That drive will be faster than most IDE/SATA drives (faster spindle
    speed, probably lower seek time), however there are some that come close
    like the Western Digital Raptor drives. As far as the interface itself,
    at least with a single drive the performance benefit from SCSI over SATA
    would be negligible (the only area where it would be better is that it
    has command queueing, however this generally only makes a difference in
    server-type multitasking environments and some SATA setups now have this
    as well).

    --
    Robert Hancock Saskatoon, SK, Canada
    To email, remove "nospam" from hancockr@nospamshaw.ca
    Home Page: http://www.roberthancock.com/
  3. Archived from groups: jaring.pcbase,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Zul wrote:

    >
    > How do you conect a SCSI hard disk to a normal
    > ( Asus P4 2.4 Ghz - 1 Gb DDR ) home PC ? Is there
    > any real advantage in using SCSI instead of the
    > normal IDE?
    > Do I have to get some special interface card and
    > is it expensive?
    > The drive was received as a gift and is a Seagate
    > Cheetah 10 K-rpm 37Gb.
    > Any advise is very appreciated as I don't know much
    > about computers ......
    > TIA

    Get a cheap scsi controller on ebay The adaptec 2940 are a dime a dozen.

    Scsi is
    - faster (up to 15,000 RPM)
    - lower access times (down to 3.4 msec)
    - generally longer warranty/more reliable (1.2 millions hours average
    between failures)
    - has smart controller cards. Controller cards with 256MB RAM buffers are
    common
    - has TCQ (tagged command queueing). The drive reorders requests to speed
    things up, though sata is getting something similar.
    - can daisy chain many drives
    - can easily have external drives.

    gtoomey
  4. Archived from groups: jaring.pcbase,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    The AHA-2940 is a 8 bit narrow SCSI controller.

    This Seagate Cheetah is a Ulta320 wide SCSI controller.
    http://www.seagate.com/cda/products/discsales/marketing/detail/0,1081,541,00.html

    Even with a AHA-2940U2W SCSI controller, the 80Mb/s transfer ratye doesn't come close to the
    drives 320Mb/s capability.

    I would suggest at the load end a 29160 SCSI card (Ultra160, wide SCSI)
    on the high end that matches the hard disk, 29320A SCSI card (Ultra320, wide SCSI)

    --
    Dave


    "Gregory Toomey" <nospam@bigpond.com> wrote in message
    news:348j11F48fap7U1@individual.net...
    | Zul wrote:
    |
    | >
    | > How do you conect a SCSI hard disk to a normal
    | > ( Asus P4 2.4 Ghz - 1 Gb DDR ) home PC ? Is there
    | > any real advantage in using SCSI instead of the
    | > normal IDE?
    | > Do I have to get some special interface card and
    | > is it expensive?
    | > The drive was received as a gift and is a Seagate
    | > Cheetah 10 K-rpm 37Gb.
    | > Any advise is very appreciated as I don't know much
    | > about computers ......
    | > TIA
    |
    | Get a cheap scsi controller on ebay The adaptec 2940 are a dime a dozen.
    |
    | Scsi is
    | - faster (up to 15,000 RPM)
    | - lower access times (down to 3.4 msec)
    | - generally longer warranty/more reliable (1.2 millions hours average
    | between failures)
    | - has smart controller cards. Controller cards with 256MB RAM buffers are
    | common
    | - has TCQ (tagged command queueing). The drive reorders requests to speed
    | things up, though sata is getting something similar.
    | - can daisy chain many drives
    | - can easily have external drives.
    |
    | gtoomey
  5. Archived from groups: jaring.pcbase,alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <8cFDd.428$hc7.406@trnddc08>, "David H. Lipman"
    <DLipman~nospam~@Verizon.Net> wrote:

    > The AHA-2940 is a 8 bit narrow SCSI controller.
    >
    > This Seagate Cheetah is a Ulta320 wide SCSI controller.
    >
    http://www.seagate.com/cda/products/discsales/marketing/detail/0,1081,541,00.html
    >
    > Even with a AHA-2940U2W SCSI controller, the 80Mb/s transfer
    > ratye doesn't come close to the drives 320Mb/s capability.
    >
    > I would suggest at the load end a 29160 SCSI card
    > (Ultra160, wide SCSI) on the high end that matches the
    > hard disk, 29320A SCSI card (Ultra320, wide SCSI)

    The example drive above has a sustained transfer rate of
    38MB to 68MB/sec (transfer speed varies with position of
    data on the disk).

    The typical PCI bus limit of 100-110MB/sec on a desktop
    motherboard will limit the transfer rate of faster
    controller cards. If you have a good server motherboard,
    then they usually have faster bus options.

    Here is pretty cheap card, but it has got to be cheap
    for a reason. It is a 64 bit PCI card, and claims to
    be backward compatible with 32 bit PCI. I hope that
    is true. The customer reviews claim the product plugs
    into WinXP, so there must be drivers for it ? This
    product only seems to be offered in OEM form (a bare
    card), so don't expect a driver disk. $31 .

    http://www.newegg.com/app/viewproductdesc.asp?description=16-118-009&DEPA=0

    I think the LSIU160 is powered by a Symbios 53C1010 chip.
    The product blurb is here. The LSIU160 card uses one
    half of this chip, and the other channel is not wired up.

    http://web.archive.org/web/20000309111808/http://www.lsilogic.com/techlib/techdocs/MARKETING_DOCS/mktgio_standard/sym53c1010.pdf

    The LSIU160 card looks similar to this SYM21040 card, only
    the components on the right hand side of the card are not
    populated:

    http://web.archive.org/web/20010331173249/http://www.lsilogic.com/techlib/marketing_docs/storage_stand_prod/habs/sym21040.pdf

    Compare to the picture of the LSIU160 on the Newegg page:
    http://images10.newegg.com/productimage/16-118-009-03.JPG

    Now all you need is a cheap ribbon cable. This is an example
    of an expensive source of SCSI accessories. Use this site
    to give you some ideas.

    http://granitedigital.com/catalog/indx_scsi.htm

    This page has cables. Their cheapest internal cable is $63!
    http://granitedigital.com/catalog/pg06_incable.htm

    Perhaps the #3450 terminator from this page ($39.95) would work.
    http://granitedigital.com/catalog/pg05_terminators.htm

    Chances are, you could buy an IDE drive, for the price of
    even the cheapest SCSI support components.

    Be aware that some SCSI drives are noisy buggers. IBM made
    some drives that do a diagnostic every 60 or 70 seconds, and
    there is a burst of head activity that will wake the dead.
    I hope your Seagate does not share that "feature".

    The drive you have been given, is not a "cheap gift". If
    it was given with a controller card, cable, terminator,
    drivers diskette, then it is a gift. This is a lot like
    being given the steering wheel of a Cadillac, and then
    having to buy the rest of the parts needed to make a
    car :-)

    HTH,
    Paul
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