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Transcend Has a PATA SSD For Your Aging PC

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Anonymous
March 30, 2012 8:16:12 PM

I could use this for my old laptop... but how is TRIM implemented with ATA?
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March 30, 2012 8:25:20 PM

Quote:
I could use this for my old laptop... but how is TRIM implemented with ATA?


I'm guessing it doesn't. Most likely some kind of internal GC (garbage collection).
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March 30, 2012 8:51:38 PM

T... h... a... t... '... s... g... r...e...a...t...!
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March 30, 2012 9:04:21 PM

At that price, a CPU, motherboard and RAM upgrade may be a better choice. Something like a G530, ASRock H61M-VS and 4GB RAM would be much better (costs ~$120).
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March 30, 2012 9:08:49 PM

Now if only they could make a solid state floppy, it takes forever to flash the BIOS....
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March 30, 2012 9:17:04 PM

This would be good for proprietary equipment that can't be removed quite yet, but more speed is desired. Mostly manufacturing control type machines, centrally controlled POS systems. Those are the machines that the person is smashing on when they take ur money at mcdonalds or some supermarket, gas station, etc... Just about any computer that has a motherboard with a ISA slot with some goofball proprietary interface card on it..... Where the owner doesn't want to tear out the whole thing just for a little burst of speed at closing time.......
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March 30, 2012 9:20:46 PM

Haaaa Haa!
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March 30, 2012 9:29:26 PM

yes this sounds a bit stupid, the same way releasing a CD burner with lightscribe in 2012 sounds stupid.
but i can imagine there being a small (yet not insignificant) market for it, and transcend is smart for seeing this.
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March 30, 2012 9:34:34 PM

I'm waiting for AGP version of GTX 680.
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March 30, 2012 9:44:35 PM

April 1 got early this year.
LOL
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March 30, 2012 9:45:20 PM

Might help a laptop with little RAM, but not sure it's worth the investment. 4 x that buys a new laptop.
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March 30, 2012 9:47:46 PM

Better to invest in the future and let old units go into retirement. That is if you got the budget.
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March 30, 2012 9:50:20 PM

christoiAt that price, a CPU, motherboard and RAM upgrade may be a better choice. Something like a G530, ASRock H61M-VS and 4GB RAM would be much better (costs ~$120).

It absolutely is, except that this drive is the 2.5" format for laptops, you'll notice in the picture there's no 4pin molex connector. This is the only reason this thing would make sense since....

a regular sata interface can be adapted to pata with a cheap adapter and vice versa. like this:
http://www.meritline.com/ide-to-sata-or-sata-to-ide-ada...
Eliminating the need for a specialized product like this.

This would only be useful for laptops, since it should carry a price premium for being a niche product, and the fact that it would physically fit in the laptop where there are space constraints.

Again bad idea. Since you'll typically be way better off just buying a new laptop, since laptops are cheap and your pata equiped laptop is practically obsolete by now, anyway.
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March 30, 2012 9:53:55 PM

I actually remember working on a core 2 laptop that had a pata drive, I thought it was so odd until I realized the manufacturer was probably using the old stock motherboards for the core duo since they shared the same mobile socket.
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March 30, 2012 10:50:29 PM

I actually saw these on their site quite a while back and they are expensive. Haven't checked recently for the prices though. Building a new computer is ultimately a better route.
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March 30, 2012 10:57:22 PM

if i had the ability i would use light scribe over my crappy handwriting,
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March 31, 2012 12:10:51 AM

no Transcend, you are not focused on what is really important... consumers don't really want new SSD's with new interfaces and such. just focus yourselves on lowering the prices!
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March 31, 2012 12:13:28 AM

christoiAt that price, a CPU, motherboard and RAM upgrade may be a better choice. Something like a G530, ASRock H61M-VS and 4GB RAM would be much better (costs ~$120).

Perhaps people want to breathe new life into their old machines.
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March 31, 2012 1:10:26 AM

good for ppl with old notebooks, nothing else ;x
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March 31, 2012 1:13:11 AM

Not everyone can afford a new PC build, but they could afford a drive like this to hold them over even longer until an upgrade becomes absolutely necessary.

Also remember that not everything in this world is using SATA- there are plenty of Point of Sale (POS) and other hardware that still uses very tried and true hardware that has stood the test of time. This could greatly improve speeds of older hardware that would benefit from disk access read/writes but no other upgrade paths currently exist.
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March 31, 2012 1:15:50 AM

g0rd0 said:
Now if only they could make a solid state floppy, it takes forever to flash the BIOS....


Joking aside that doesn't seem possible. The read/write head is not inside the floppy like in hdds so they would have to have some sort of interface that would communicate with the head. Whereas with a hdd they can just use the ata interface.
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March 31, 2012 1:41:01 AM

Quote:
Joking aside that doesn't seem possible.


Congratulations, you got the joke.
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March 31, 2012 2:07:34 AM

When did people start calling IDE PATA?
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March 31, 2012 2:25:55 AM

Nice,
XP and Win 98 have less background clutter/activity. Trim is less of a necessity there.
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March 31, 2012 2:42:10 AM

spaceinvaderxWhen did people start calling IDE PATA?


ATA was the industry standard name for IDE which was a WD proprietary format originally. Then in 03' SATA came out and ATA became PATA retroactively.
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Anonymous
March 31, 2012 3:39:49 AM

seriously? if you have enough for an ssd why dont you upgrade the whole system? if your system only supports pata then it's suppose to be obsolete
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March 31, 2012 8:12:31 AM

I'm currently browsing this page on an aged laptop from 2006! It's running W7 though, and quite stable with it. I only use it for browsing, email, and the occasional office document, so it's not exactly stretched. The only thing I wouldn't mind is for it to be a bit faster in the HDD department when it comes to read performance. If the price of the 64GB or 128GB drives is below 100 GBP, then it might be worth upgrading this laptop. If the prices of the larger drives are in the 150-200 GBP mark or more, then it just wouldn't be worth it and like others have said, better to get a new laptop.
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March 31, 2012 12:06:41 PM

Isn't the maximum bandwidth for ide/pata around 100/130 mb/s? Doesn't that seem to defeat the purpose?
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March 31, 2012 12:07:27 PM

PATA SSD's... Helping users reach bottlenecks in record time!
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March 31, 2012 3:17:00 PM

This is great for an older laptop, especially the lower power draw. Did Transcend think ahead and implement these SSDs with 512 byte blocks? Machines that use PATA are also typically running XP, and with older bios as well. Both of these are going to have problems with the larger 4K blocks that most SSDs utilize.

This upgrade path needs to have as little problems possible for it to be useful, as well as minimal extra cost (no OS upgrade, etc.). Otherwise, like the other comments, it appears to me that it is better to upgrade the system as a whole (OS, MB, CPU, mem, and SSD).
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March 31, 2012 6:34:22 PM

zootedIsn't the maximum bandwidth for ide/pata around 100/130 mb/s? Doesn't that seem to defeat the purpose?

No, it doesn't. The "purpose" of SSDs isn't their sequential read/write speeds, that's merely a nice bonus. What really makes SSDs far superior to HDDs are their low (pratcially non-existent) seek times and random read/write speeds that are in a whole 'nother stratosphere compared to HDDs.
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April 1, 2012 2:55:08 AM

upgrading some machines requires all new software because the new hardware doesn't work on 98/xp and the new software is quite expensive, thousands of dollars expensive esp. for businesses where it amounts to tens and hundreds of thousands of dollars.
remember the halo 2 debacle?
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April 1, 2012 6:18:09 AM

If the price were right I would consider buying this. I still have a IBM ThinkPad T30 that I use all the time for simple jobs like at school in my computer networking lab, office applications, and just general web browsing. It runs Windows 7 just fine as is. But the important thing would be the random access times especially at the lower I/Os that you would typically be at on an older laptop doing general computing. The throughput isn't as important in my opinion for a product like this.
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April 1, 2012 8:09:18 AM

Remember that it's not about the sequential reads/writes for everyday performance. The majority of the benefit is the random read/write improvement (even the fastest consumer SSDs hardly saturate PATA in random I/O). In that light, a PATA SSD doesn't look as bad. It is certainly a niche product (POS, old systems, and such as people said above) but it will add some more life into an old system.
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April 2, 2012 12:07:17 AM

Stardude82ATA was the industry standard name for IDE which was a WD proprietary format originally. Then in 03' SATA came out and ATA became PATA retroactively.

indeed. Because it's Parallel, opposed to Serial.
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April 2, 2012 12:10:21 AM

zootedIsn't the maximum bandwidth for ide/pata around 100/130 mb/s? Doesn't that seem to defeat the purpose?

No! Why? Because the real strenght of SSD is in r/w of very small files. HDD's go into kilobytes/second, when disk head is jumping around to locate very small files. As Sheldon would say, it's only logical...
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April 2, 2012 12:27:46 AM

Wow! This would've been great for my K6-2 sytem!
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!