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Which Asus LGA775 board is most popular now? 915P, 915G, 9..

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February 7, 2005 10:44:38 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

I'm having a big headache trying to decide which motherboard to buy. I'll
likely buy an ASUS or ABIT eventhough I've had bad luck with Asus boards in
the past (but looks like it's still the popular one these days). And will
probably go with LGA775 since it seems to be a replacement to the older
ones.

So now I find many different chipsets out now .. 915P, 915G, 925X, 925XE,
etc. Which one is the "most economical for end users" and thus most
popular? I do not need features like RAID or dual LAN but would like the
latest technology to maximize life of system in terms of upgrades :-)

Also will they work with an Antec Phantom 350W PSU or will I need an
adapter?

More about : asus lga775 board popular 915p 915g

February 7, 2005 3:40:46 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

In article <soJNd.1425$504.186010@news20.bellglobal.com>, "Jojo"
<josNOSPAM555@yahoo.com> wrote:

> I'm having a big headache trying to decide which motherboard to buy. I'll
> likely buy an ASUS or ABIT eventhough I've had bad luck with Asus boards in
> the past (but looks like it's still the popular one these days). And will
> probably go with LGA775 since it seems to be a replacement to the older
> ones.
>
> So now I find many different chipsets out now .. 915P, 915G, 925X, 925XE,
> etc. Which one is the "most economical for end users" and thus most
> popular? I do not need features like RAID or dual LAN but would like the
> latest technology to maximize life of system in terms of upgrades :-)
>
> Also will they work with an Antec Phantom 350W PSU or will I need an
> adapter?

To measure popularity, you can visit the download page.
(Note: This metric is all I've got, as you aren't likely
to find sales figures anywhere.)

http://www.asus.com.tw/support/download/download.aspx

Pop in the model name, and select "All" for filetype.
Then, select a file by clicking it. You will see a
web page that offers you four servers to download from.
At the bottom of the page, is a field that says how many
times the file has been downloaded.

Here, I tried to pick a representative file. The file
chosen, is the chipset driver file for the board. Now,
a customer could go to the Intel or Via website, and also
get the file, but I'll assume the same percentage of
customers stick with the Asus site.

p5ad2-e premium 925xe inf6211001.zip 1051 downloads
p5ad2 premium 925x inf6211001.zip 141 downloads
p5gdc deluxe 915p inf6211001.zip 1074 downloads
p5gd2 premium 915p inf6011002.zip 1084 downloads
p5gdc-v deluxe 915g inf6211001.zip 1145 downloads

A8V Deluxe S939 4in1_449p3.zip 5318 downloads
K8V SE Deluxe S754 4in1_449.zip 6062 downloads

The last two items are AMD boards.

Obviously, a person who can afford to buy the 925x, can
afford whatever extra it costs for a 925xe. So, that result
is easy to explain. What I cannot explain, is why the 915p
boards aren't more popular. I would expect (without checking
it), that the 915p boards are cheaper than their 925
counterparts, and judging by how price conscious people on
this newsgroup are, that should make the 915p more attractive.
Maybe the Asus 915p boards are just too expensive compared
to the competition, and some other vendor is more popular ?

Something to remember when comparing boards, is Asus has
covered many different combinations of PCI-Express/AGP,
DDR/DDR2, LGA775/S478 and so on. The price adder for some
of these options, makes a big difference to many customers,
and not many people want to buy a new LGA775 processor,
a high end PCI-Express video card, and some DDR2 memory,
when they have some perfectly good S478 processor, AGP
Video card, and DDR memory sitting around. So, what you
decide to buy, could be influenced by what parts you
currently own. If that is not the case, then buy a
p5ad2-e premium, and go "all new tech".

One you didn't mention, is the P5P800. It uses an 865PE
Northbridge, and is similar to a P4P800, only it has
the newer LGA775 processor socket on it. Since only the
socket is upgraded, you could take all the parts off a
previous generation S478 system, buy a new LGA775 processor,
and build a system that way. That might be a bit more
cost effective than going with the P5xxx crowd.

To answer your power supply question, really requires
knowledge of what video card you have in mind. A high end
ATI card uses 3.3A from +12V, and a high end Nvidia card
uses 4.5A from +12V. The TDP is 84W or 115W for the Intel
LGA775 processors (it is a function of core frequency),
and assuming 90% conversion efficiency, that is 7.8A or
10.6A from the +12V supply. So far, that means 11..15 amps
for a processor and a high end video card. Disk drives and
fans will add more amps to the requirement. Rather than shop
by total power, it is better to work out the amps needed,
and in this case (Intel P4), +12V has the heavy load on it.
If your existing supply isn't good for at least 15 amps
on the +12V output, I'd be shopping for something with more
output.

Here is a sample table of Antec Truepower numbers. You can
see that even though the total power is increasing pretty
rapidly, the current available on the +12V isn't really
going up that much. That is why I'd rather compare the
current numbers themselves, to another brand, for
shopping purposes.

VOLTAGE +5V +12V +3.3V -5V -12V +5VSB
TRUE330 30A 17A 28A 0.5A 1.0A 2.0A
TRUE380 35A 18A 28A 0.5A 1.0A 2.0A
TRUE430 36A 20A 28A 0.5A 1.0A 2.0A
TRUE480 38A 22A 30A 1.5A 1.0A 2.0A
TRUE550 40A 24A 32A 0.5A 1.0A 2.0A

Something else to note. Power is current times volts, and if
you sum all the output powers on the Truepower table above,
it adds up to more than the rated power. This is good, because
on a given computer, only one output is really heavily loaded,
and you'll run out of amperes before you run out of watts.
You will find some other brands, state their "power" as being
exactly equal to the sum of all the outputs, and that makes
their power rating worth about 60% of a properly rated supply
like the Antec above. (This is because you cannot draw the max
from all the outputs at the same time, so adding the powers
directly is not correct. The power supply is limited by
overheating, and the real power it offers stops before all
outputs go to max.) What it boils down to, is stick with
brand name supplies, if you expect to get something with
representative ratings. After all, there has to be a reason
that one company can offer a "550W" power supply for only $26.

HTH,
Paul
February 8, 2005 2:54:19 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

Thanks for the info! Well I don't have any spare parts lying around other
than possibly the GFTi4200 I have in my system now. But that would mean I
have to buy a cheap AGP card to replace it with.

i like your idea of determining which is most popular. Regarding your
analysis I think actually the 915P is more popular than you said it is,
since if you combine the two 915P motherboard you get a total of 2000+
downloads. And as for 915P vs. 915G ... after a little more research I
notice 915G is the same as 915P but with integrated graphics. So I would
even pay a little more for 915G since I've found having backup graphics is
useful sometimes (especially now since I haven't decided on a video card
yet). Also notice the price is around the same ... the p5gdc-v deluxe seems
to be the same price as the 915P ones more or less.




"Paul" <nospam@needed.com> wrote in message
news:nospam-0702051241310001@192.168.1.177...
> In article <soJNd.1425$504.186010@news20.bellglobal.com>, "Jojo"
> <josNOSPAM555@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>> I'm having a big headache trying to decide which motherboard to buy.
>> I'll
>> likely buy an ASUS or ABIT eventhough I've had bad luck with Asus boards
>> in
>> the past (but looks like it's still the popular one these days). And
>> will
>> probably go with LGA775 since it seems to be a replacement to the older
>> ones.
>>
>> So now I find many different chipsets out now .. 915P, 915G, 925X, 925XE,
>> etc. Which one is the "most economical for end users" and thus most
>> popular? I do not need features like RAID or dual LAN but would like the
>> latest technology to maximize life of system in terms of upgrades :-)
>>
>> Also will they work with an Antec Phantom 350W PSU or will I need an
>> adapter?
>
> To measure popularity, you can visit the download page.
> (Note: This metric is all I've got, as you aren't likely
> to find sales figures anywhere.)
>
> http://www.asus.com.tw/support/download/download.aspx
>
> Pop in the model name, and select "All" for filetype.
> Then, select a file by clicking it. You will see a
> web page that offers you four servers to download from.
> At the bottom of the page, is a field that says how many
> times the file has been downloaded.
>
> Here, I tried to pick a representative file. The file
> chosen, is the chipset driver file for the board. Now,
> a customer could go to the Intel or Via website, and also
> get the file, but I'll assume the same percentage of
> customers stick with the Asus site.
>
> p5ad2-e premium 925xe inf6211001.zip 1051 downloads
> p5ad2 premium 925x inf6211001.zip 141 downloads
> p5gdc deluxe 915p inf6211001.zip 1074 downloads
> p5gd2 premium 915p inf6011002.zip 1084 downloads
> p5gdc-v deluxe 915g inf6211001.zip 1145 downloads
>
> A8V Deluxe S939 4in1_449p3.zip 5318 downloads
> K8V SE Deluxe S754 4in1_449.zip 6062 downloads
>
> The last two items are AMD boards.
>
> Obviously, a person who can afford to buy the 925x, can
> afford whatever extra it costs for a 925xe. So, that result
> is easy to explain. What I cannot explain, is why the 915p
> boards aren't more popular. I would expect (without checking
> it), that the 915p boards are cheaper than their 925
> counterparts, and judging by how price conscious people on
> this newsgroup are, that should make the 915p more attractive.
> Maybe the Asus 915p boards are just too expensive compared
> to the competition, and some other vendor is more popular ?
>
> Something to remember when comparing boards, is Asus has
> covered many different combinations of PCI-Express/AGP,
> DDR/DDR2, LGA775/S478 and so on. The price adder for some
> of these options, makes a big difference to many customers,
> and not many people want to buy a new LGA775 processor,
> a high end PCI-Express video card, and some DDR2 memory,
> when they have some perfectly good S478 processor, AGP
> Video card, and DDR memory sitting around. So, what you
> decide to buy, could be influenced by what parts you
> currently own. If that is not the case, then buy a
> p5ad2-e premium, and go "all new tech".
>
> One you didn't mention, is the P5P800. It uses an 865PE
> Northbridge, and is similar to a P4P800, only it has
> the newer LGA775 processor socket on it. Since only the
> socket is upgraded, you could take all the parts off a
> previous generation S478 system, buy a new LGA775 processor,
> and build a system that way. That might be a bit more
> cost effective than going with the P5xxx crowd.
>
> To answer your power supply question, really requires
> knowledge of what video card you have in mind. A high end
> ATI card uses 3.3A from +12V, and a high end Nvidia card
> uses 4.5A from +12V. The TDP is 84W or 115W for the Intel
> LGA775 processors (it is a function of core frequency),
> and assuming 90% conversion efficiency, that is 7.8A or
> 10.6A from the +12V supply. So far, that means 11..15 amps
> for a processor and a high end video card. Disk drives and
> fans will add more amps to the requirement. Rather than shop
> by total power, it is better to work out the amps needed,
> and in this case (Intel P4), +12V has the heavy load on it.
> If your existing supply isn't good for at least 15 amps
> on the +12V output, I'd be shopping for something with more
> output.
>
> Here is a sample table of Antec Truepower numbers. You can
> see that even though the total power is increasing pretty
> rapidly, the current available on the +12V isn't really
> going up that much. That is why I'd rather compare the
> current numbers themselves, to another brand, for
> shopping purposes.
>
> VOLTAGE +5V +12V +3.3V -5V -12V +5VSB
> TRUE330 30A 17A 28A 0.5A 1.0A 2.0A
> TRUE380 35A 18A 28A 0.5A 1.0A 2.0A
> TRUE430 36A 20A 28A 0.5A 1.0A 2.0A
> TRUE480 38A 22A 30A 1.5A 1.0A 2.0A
> TRUE550 40A 24A 32A 0.5A 1.0A 2.0A
>
> Something else to note. Power is current times volts, and if
> you sum all the output powers on the Truepower table above,
> it adds up to more than the rated power. This is good, because
> on a given computer, only one output is really heavily loaded,
> and you'll run out of amperes before you run out of watts.
> You will find some other brands, state their "power" as being
> exactly equal to the sum of all the outputs, and that makes
> their power rating worth about 60% of a properly rated supply
> like the Antec above. (This is because you cannot draw the max
> from all the outputs at the same time, so adding the powers
> directly is not correct. The power supply is limited by
> overheating, and the real power it offers stops before all
> outputs go to max.) What it boils down to, is stick with
> brand name supplies, if you expect to get something with
> representative ratings. After all, there has to be a reason
> that one company can offer a "550W" power supply for only $26.
>
> HTH,
> Paul
!