Damn Microsoft Activation!!!!

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

I am SO SICK AND TIRED of calling Microsoft on the telephone to
reactivate every goddamn time I change my motherboard!!!

They are the *only* software company I know of which requires hardware
enthusiasts who change hardware regularly to constantly call them and
read off strings of numbers whenever there is a significant hardware
change. It is *SO* *FREAKING* *ARROGANT*!! I own hundreds of software
titles - they are the *only one* that makes me do this.

What makes it so bad is that installing new hardware can sometimes be
a *very* frustrating experience, especially if you get a bad board or
RAM. Once you get to this screen, you may have been pulling your hair
out for hours, and you just want to scream when you see you have to
call them.

To add insult to injury, their automated system was all screwed up
today, and the automated voice kept dropping out and wouldnt respond
to input, so I had to get forwarded to a human.

I have no problem whatsoever with them incorporating antipiracy, but I
have *lots* of software with antipiracy techniques, and NONE of them
are this obnoxious.

What really annoys me is that all I have to do is tell them that I am
installing a new motherboard and I dont have it on multiple computers
- and they are like 'ok!'.

If thats OK, then how about just putting a radio button thats says 'I
installed some new hardware and am only running this on one computer -
leave me alone!' and save us both a lot of trouble!!!

GAAHHH!@!!
</rant>
14 answers Last reply
More about damn microsoft activation
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    >-----Original Message-----
    >I am SO SICK AND TIRED of calling Microsoft on the
    telephone to
    >reactivate every goddamn time I change my motherboard!!!
    >
    >They are the *only* software company I know of which
    requires hardware
    >enthusiasts who change hardware regularly to constantly
    call them and
    >read off strings of numbers whenever there is a
    significant hardware
    >change. It is *SO* *FREAKING* *ARROGANT*!! I own hundreds
    of software
    >titles - they are the *only one* that makes me do this.
    >
    >What makes it so bad is that installing new hardware can
    sometimes be
    >a *very* frustrating experience, especially if you get a
    bad board or
    >RAM. Once you get to this screen, you may have been
    pulling your hair
    >out for hours, and you just want to scream when you see
    you have to
    >call them.
    >
    >To add insult to injury, their automated system was all
    screwed up
    >today, and the automated voice kept dropping out and
    wouldnt respond
    >to input, so I had to get forwarded to a human.
    >
    >I have no problem whatsoever with them incorporating
    antipiracy, but I
    >have *lots* of software with antipiracy techniques, and
    NONE of them
    >are this obnoxious.
    >
    >What really annoys me is that all I have to do is tell
    them that I am
    >installing a new motherboard and I dont have it on
    multiple computers
    >- and they are like 'ok!'.
    >
    >If thats OK, then how about just putting a radio button
    thats says 'I
    >installed some new hardware and am only running this on
    one computer -
    >leave me alone!' and save us both a lot of trouble!!!
    >
    >GAAHHH!@!!
    ></rant>
    >.

    "Hardware enthusiasts"?? You sure make it sound like a
    lovely and relaxing avocation. You need to understand that
    your frustration is a result of your neurosis, and not
    the fault of a large corporation that's out to get you.
    Yes, activation is a PITA, and it serves mainly to obstruct
    honest users, but you need to get a grip and stop looking
    for trouble. Why not try knitting?
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    well thats not right you should not have to do this if the
    screen come up again to call microsoft try control alt
    delete and stop the program.they have no legal right to
    know whats on your computer other than windows,thats why
    motherboard makers provide microsoft with drivers etc...
    >-----Original Message-----
    >I am SO SICK AND TIRED of calling Microsoft on the
    telephone to
    >reactivate every goddamn time I change my motherboard!!!
    >
    >They are the *only* software company I know of which
    requires hardware
    >enthusiasts who change hardware regularly to constantly
    call them and
    >read off strings of numbers whenever there is a
    significant hardware
    >change. It is *SO* *FREAKING* *ARROGANT*!! I own hundreds
    of software
    >titles - they are the *only one* that makes me do this.
    >
    >What makes it so bad is that installing new hardware can
    sometimes be
    >a *very* frustrating experience, especially if you get a
    bad board or
    >RAM. Once you get to this screen, you may have been
    pulling your hair
    >out for hours, and you just want to scream when you see
    you have to
    >call them.
    >
    >To add insult to injury, their automated system was all
    screwed up
    >today, and the automated voice kept dropping out and
    wouldnt respond
    >to input, so I had to get forwarded to a human.
    >
    >I have no problem whatsoever with them incorporating
    antipiracy, but I
    >have *lots* of software with antipiracy techniques, and
    NONE of them
    >are this obnoxious.
    >
    >What really annoys me is that all I have to do is tell
    them that I am
    >installing a new motherboard and I dont have it on
    multiple computers
    >- and they are like 'ok!'.
    >
    >If thats OK, then how about just putting a radio button
    thats says 'I
    >installed some new hardware and am only running this on
    one computer -
    >leave me alone!' and save us both a lot of trouble!!!
    >
    >GAAHHH!@!!
    ></rant>
    >.
    >
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Greetings --

    Replacing a non-defective motherboard more frequently than every 4
    months is not "hardware enthusiasm." It's just plain silly.
    Particularly since you know in advance that activation will be
    requires - you're just deliberately asking for trouble and looking for
    an excuse to whine. I've no sympathy. Perhaps you'd prefer one of
    these other common means of software copy-protection:

    1) The hardware dongles that must be attached to the parallel port to
    enable an application to work?

    2) Faxing a document signed by a company officer certifying the
    number of installations before being sent a code to enable the
    software?

    3) Performing the application installations at bizarre hours of the
    night because you have to call another time-zone during the
    installation in order to obtain the necessary registration code from a
    company representative?


    Bruce Chambers
    --
    Help us help you:
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on
    having both at once. - RAH


    "Seth Brundle" <brundlefly76@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:53e2ec95.0408051118.18236d68@posting.google.com...
    > I am SO SICK AND TIRED of calling Microsoft on the telephone to
    > reactivate every goddamn time I change my motherboard!!!
    >
    > They are the *only* software company I know of which requires
    hardware
    > enthusiasts who change hardware regularly to constantly call them
    and
    > read off strings of numbers whenever there is a significant hardware
    > change. It is *SO* *FREAKING* *ARROGANT*!! I own hundreds of
    software
    > titles - they are the *only one* that makes me do this.
    >
    > What makes it so bad is that installing new hardware can sometimes
    be
    > a *very* frustrating experience, especially if you get a bad board
    or
    > RAM. Once you get to this screen, you may have been pulling your
    hair
    > out for hours, and you just want to scream when you see you have to
    > call them.
    >
    > To add insult to injury, their automated system was all screwed up
    > today, and the automated voice kept dropping out and wouldnt respond
    > to input, so I had to get forwarded to a human.
    >
    > I have no problem whatsoever with them incorporating antipiracy, but
    I
    > have *lots* of software with antipiracy techniques, and NONE of them
    > are this obnoxious.
    >
    > What really annoys me is that all I have to do is tell them that I
    am
    > installing a new motherboard and I dont have it on multiple
    computers
    > - and they are like 'ok!'.
    >
    > If thats OK, then how about just putting a radio button thats says
    'I
    > installed some new hardware and am only running this on one
    computer -
    > leave me alone!' and save us both a lot of trouble!!!
    >
    > GAAHHH!@!!
    > </rant>
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    > Replacing a non-defective motherboard more frequently than every 4
    > months is not "hardware enthusiasm." It's just plain silly.

    Thats your opinion. I can do whatever I want to do with my computers,
    and I choose to upgrade frequently - no one gets to tell me what is
    'silly'. Recently I upgraded my dual-boot system to AMD64 because Suse
    can run 64-bit software, which I required to port my Linux software
    projects so my users with AMD64 can compile and make use of the
    extensions, but I dont need an excuse that good to upgrade any time I
    choose. Thats my business, not M$'s

    > Particularly since you know in advance that activation will be
    > requires - you're just deliberately asking for trouble and looking for
    > an excuse to whine. I've no sympathy.

    No, its just that if I have decided I want new hardware, Im not going
    to let Microsoft stop me from doing it just because its the one piece
    of software on 16 of my workstations and servers which makes me call
    them, like a friggin parent, to get their permission.

    Let me ask you this - how would you like it if *every* piece of
    software you own worked exactly like WPA? Doesnt scale very well, does
    it? I would have been on the phone with over 25 companies every time I
    make a significant hardware change. What is so special about Microsoft
    that they get to do this?

    Perhaps you'd prefer one of
    > these other common means of software copy-protection:
    (snip)

    I dont own one single piece of software that requires any of those
    methods, so I dont know what youre talking about.

    Of the hundreds of titles I do own, Microsoft Windows and Office 2003
    are the *only* ones that insist on getting involved when I change
    hardware. Period.

    Although even as a Linux developer I would be the last one to ever say
    that Linux can replace Windows at this point, I *cant wait* until it
    can. Even commercial Linux distros dont make me go through M$'s happy
    horseshit.

    What is really funny is that the only company which requires me to
    take such invasive and bothersome steps to prevent piracy is also the
    most profitable software company in the world - and was long before
    WPA.
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Want a litte cheese with that?

    Seth Brundle wrote:

    >> Replacing a non-defective motherboard more frequently than every 4
    >>months is not "hardware enthusiasm." It's just plain silly.
    >>
    >
    > Thats your opinion. I can do whatever I want to do with my computers,

    <snip rest of pointless rant>
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Seth;
    Unfortunately you are in an extreme minority.
    Microsoft thought long and hard before implementing WPA.
    Microsoft came up with a plan which is a compromise between user
    convenience and protection of their property.
    The majority of users have little inconvenience.
    I do understand the frustration of constantly calling in for
    activation.
    Unfortunately I have no practical suggestion.

    If you want to get away from phone activation, the only thing I can
    think of is another Windows XP license.
    Then you could rotate them and reduce the chance for having to call.
    Not a good solution at all but if you want to constantly change
    hardware and avoid the phone, that may be the only solution.

    --
    Jupiter Jones [MVP]
    http://www3.telus.net/dandemar/


    "Seth Brundle" <brundlefly76@hotmail.com> wrote in message > Thats
    your opinion. I can do whatever I want to do with my computers,
    > and I choose to upgrade frequently - no one gets to tell me what is
    > 'silly'. Recently I upgraded my dual-boot system to AMD64 because
    Suse
    > can run 64-bit software, which I required to port my Linux software
    > projects so my users with AMD64 can compile and make use of the
    > extensions, but I dont need an excuse that good to upgrade any time
    I
    > choose. Thats my business, not M$'s
    >
    > No, its just that if I have decided I want new hardware, Im not
    going
    > to let Microsoft stop me from doing it just because its the one
    piece
    > of software on 16 of my workstations and servers which makes me call
    > them, like a friggin parent, to get their permission.
    >
    > Let me ask you this - how would you like it if *every* piece of
    > software you own worked exactly like WPA? Doesnt scale very well,
    does
    > it? I would have been on the phone with over 25 companies every time
    I
    > make a significant hardware change. What is so special about
    Microsoft
    > that they get to do this?
    >
    > Perhaps you'd prefer one of
    > > these other common means of software copy-protection:
    > (snip)
    >
    > I dont own one single piece of software that requires any of those
    > methods, so I dont know what youre talking about.
    >
    > Of the hundreds of titles I do own, Microsoft Windows and Office
    2003
    > are the *only* ones that insist on getting involved when I change
    > hardware. Period.
    >
    > Although even as a Linux developer I would be the last one to ever
    say
    > that Linux can replace Windows at this point, I *cant wait* until it
    > can. Even commercial Linux distros dont make me go through M$'s
    happy
    > horseshit.
    >
    > What is really funny is that the only company which requires me to
    > take such invasive and bothersome steps to prevent piracy is also
    the
    > most profitable software company in the world - and was long before
    > WPA.
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    You don't have xp. I sure there are some old copies of windows 2000
    you could buy on the web that don't require activation.


    Greg R
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    LOL, the truth is if you are doing something that requires you to change
    the hardware this much, you should look into getting a Corp version.
    Many hardware review websites purchase special VLK licenses for a
    handful of machines so that they don't have to deal with Activation
    every time. Most of them save the money and just don't activate though :)

    ----
    Nathan McNulty


    Greg R wrote:
    > You don't have xp. I sure there are some old copies of windows 2000
    > you could buy on the web that don't require activation.
    >
    >
    > Greg R
  9. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Jupiter Jones [MVP]

    I can understand a hardware tester doing this. The hardware tester
    most likely has a volume license key that requires no activation.

    He going to break his machine if he keep changing his hardware.


    Greg R
  10. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Greetings --

    Wouldn't bother me a bit.

    Bruce Chambers
    --
    Help us help you:
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on
    having both at once. - RAH


    "Seth Brundle" <brundlefly76@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:53e2ec95.0408052259.161427f7@posting.google.com...
    >
    > Let me ask you this - how would you like it if *every* piece of
    > software you own worked exactly like WPA?
  11. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    > Lo and Behold, I never read the most important part...you only have to do
    > that if you buy a computer with XP pre-loaded, and you have THEIR disk and
    > not the XP disk. We have three computers in our house, and we each have our
    > own XP Home Full disk. After I rebuilt her computer, I reformated her
    > primary hard drive, reinstalled XP, and reactivated it over the net in about
    > fifteen seconds. I was quite a happy camper.
    >
    > Since I've actually done what I claimed, I know what I'm talking about,
    > which is why I seriously doubt that this guy does.

    No, thats not true at all. I have a full retail boxed XP Professional
    and built the original machine from scratch. Its not OEM. You can
    activate Windows a second time like you did and it may be fine, maybe
    not. But once you have changed motherboards 4-5 times like I have, it
    starts pinging you every time, retail or OEM makes no difference.

    Ive built over 3 dozen machines, both Linux and Windows, workstations
    and servers, in the past 10 years. You will notice that even the MVP's
    and M$ folks dont dispute my claim here, but hilariously some people
    think WPA is fine - even one guy saying that he wouldnt mind a bit if
    he had to call every software vendor every time he changed his
    motherboard (LOL!) Lil more experience then the guy upgrading his
    daughters computer.

    The fact is, the only reason M$ gets away with WPA is that they are
    the only ones doing it so far for the most part, other titles which
    have hardcore activation not being nearly as mainstream.

    But you notice M$ is not offering WPA as a solution within the OS to
    other software vendors (why not? works great, right - why not offer it
    as an OS service?), because once 4 major titles start doing it people
    will start screaming.
  12. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    I have 7 computers with quite a few different hardware configurations.
    I do beta testing and many other things that require me to switch up
    these configurations constantly. I am always running into WPA and
    having to call in and activate. They never argue with me and it takes
    all of about 5 minutes. I agree that it is almost pointless because the
    only people who are going to be stopped from stealing Windows because of
    WPA are simple folk who don't know anything about computers.

    WPA would be a great feature if it weren't so easily bypassed. The
    purpose of WPA has been defeated and the only other reason for it is to
    prevent people from installing their single licensed XP on all of their
    computers. Personally, I don't like WPA very much, but honestly it
    doesn't bother me at all. I can live with having to call in and
    activate over the phone. Now the day they tell me they won't activate
    it for me will be when I go ranting as you have :)

    ----
    Nathan McNulty


    Minnie Johnson wrote:
    >>Lo and Behold, I never read the most important part...you only have to do
    >>that if you buy a computer with XP pre-loaded, and you have THEIR disk and
    >>not the XP disk. We have three computers in our house, and we each have our
    >>own XP Home Full disk. After I rebuilt her computer, I reformated her
    >>primary hard drive, reinstalled XP, and reactivated it over the net in about
    >>fifteen seconds. I was quite a happy camper.
    >>
    >>Since I've actually done what I claimed, I know what I'm talking about,
    >>which is why I seriously doubt that this guy does.
    >
    >
    > No, thats not true at all. I have a full retail boxed XP Professional
    > and built the original machine from scratch. Its not OEM. You can
    > activate Windows a second time like you did and it may be fine, maybe
    > not. But once you have changed motherboards 4-5 times like I have, it
    > starts pinging you every time, retail or OEM makes no difference.
    >
    > Ive built over 3 dozen machines, both Linux and Windows, workstations
    > and servers, in the past 10 years. You will notice that even the MVP's
    > and M$ folks dont dispute my claim here, but hilariously some people
    > think WPA is fine - even one guy saying that he wouldnt mind a bit if
    > he had to call every software vendor every time he changed his
    > motherboard (LOL!) Lil more experience then the guy upgrading his
    > daughters computer.
    >
    > The fact is, the only reason M$ gets away with WPA is that they are
    > the only ones doing it so far for the most part, other titles which
    > have hardcore activation not being nearly as mainstream.
    >
    > But you notice M$ is not offering WPA as a solution within the OS to
    > other software vendors (why not? works great, right - why not offer it
    > as an OS service?), because once 4 major titles start doing it people
    > will start screaming.
  13. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    >No, thats not true at all. I have a full retail boxed XP Professional
    >and built the original machine from scratch. Its not OEM. You can
    >activate Windows a second time like you did and it may be fine, maybe
    >not. But once you have changed motherboards 4-5 times like I have, it
    >starts pinging you every time, retail or OEM makes no difference.
    >
    >Ive built over 3 dozen machines, both Linux and Windows, workstations
    >and servers, in the past 10 years. You will notice that even the MVP's
    >and M$ folks dont dispute my claim here, but hilariously some people
    >think WPA is fine - even one guy saying that he wouldnt mind a bit if
    >he had to call every software vendor every time he changed his
    >motherboard (LOL!) Lil more experience then the guy upgrading his
    >daughters computer.
    >
    >The fact is, the only reason M$ gets away with WPA is that they are
    >the only ones doing it so far for the most part, other titles which
    >have hardcore activation not being nearly as mainstream.

    Nortons and Macromedia are using it. Others will follow.
  14. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Here is a list of Program that require you to activate
    http://www.vttoth.com/dontactivate.asp

    There maybe some others as well.

    Greg R
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