Motherborad & ATX Backplate Compatibility

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

Having decided to build my own PC I have chosen the P4P800 -E/Deluxe mobo,
along with a P4 E 3.0G Intel proc and appropriate memory. However, in
looking for a nice shiny new case in which to house all this expensive
gubbins, I noticed that the ATX input/output backplate (cut-outs for USB,
Parallel, Serial, Sound, etc connectors) on all the cases that I looked at
were different from the I/O layout on the back of the ASUS mobo. ASUS mobos
seem to have substantially more connectors than the standard (?) ATX
cut-outs I have seen. I asked a couple of case manufacturers and they told
me that the backplates come with the motherboards. I looked at a couple of
motherboards at a local shop where a very flimsy plate was supplied but this
looked like some kind of screening plate and did not have any fixing holes
to screw it to the ATC case aperture. Also several people tell me that
cases come with an assortment of backplates.

Looking at various cases and motherboards, there seem to be so many
different backplate layouts and methods of attaching them to the main case,
that I would be surprised if it was possible to make a perfect match without
having to resort to drilling, filing and compromising neatness.

Can anyone advise before I give up and buy a bare bones, which means major
compromises having to be made.

Thanks
DIY
5 answers Last reply
More about motherborad backplate compatibility
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <cvq3vr$c3t$1@news6.svr.pol.co.uk>, "Tony"
    <nospam@nospam.co.uk> wrote:

    > Having decided to build my own PC I have chosen the P4P800 -E/Deluxe mobo,
    > along with a P4 E 3.0G Intel proc and appropriate memory. However, in
    > looking for a nice shiny new case in which to house all this expensive
    > gubbins, I noticed that the ATX input/output backplate (cut-outs for USB,
    > Parallel, Serial, Sound, etc connectors) on all the cases that I looked at
    > were different from the I/O layout on the back of the ASUS mobo. ASUS mobos
    > seem to have substantially more connectors than the standard (?) ATX
    > cut-outs I have seen. I asked a couple of case manufacturers and they told
    > me that the backplates come with the motherboards. I looked at a couple of
    > motherboards at a local shop where a very flimsy plate was supplied but this
    > looked like some kind of screening plate and did not have any fixing holes
    > to screw it to the ATC case aperture. Also several people tell me that
    > cases come with an assortment of backplates.
    >
    > Looking at various cases and motherboards, there seem to be so many
    > different backplate layouts and methods of attaching them to the main case,
    > that I would be surprised if it was possible to make a perfect match without
    > having to resort to drilling, filing and compromising neatness.
    >
    > Can anyone advise before I give up and buy a bare bones, which means major
    > compromises having to be made.
    >
    > Thanks
    > DIY

    There is a standard for the backplate. The backplates are
    interchangable, and they are a compression fit into the aperture
    in the back of the computer case. Simply pop out the old one and
    pop in the new.

    http://web.archive.org/web/20021201185206/http://www.formfactors.org/developer/specs/atx/atxio_11.pdf

    Installing the plate on the inside of the case, means the motherboard
    connectors press against it and keep it in place. So, once the
    motherboard is secure and screwed down, the backplate isn't going
    anywhere because it is "trapped", as well as being snapped into
    place.

    You could probably install the motherboard without the backplate.
    But the purpose of the backplate, and the conductive springs on
    the I/O connectors, is to drain electromagnetic interference into
    the chassis, rather than let the I/O connectors function as radio
    antennas. Although the scheme is flimsy, it is all part of trying
    to prevent your computer from disturbing your broadcast TV reception.
    A lot of the noise that escapes the computer, is via any wires that
    escape the case, and that includes keyboard, mouse, video cables
    and so on.

    One source of interference I find annoying, is via the power cord.
    A computer power supply is supposed to have a common mode filter
    on the incoming AC, and the filter is supposed to prevent noise
    from escaping back down the power cord. A couple of ATX supplies
    I have here, are very poor at it. You can find power strips with
    common mode filters (chokes) inside them, and such a power strip
    can further reduce the herringbone pattern on a TV.

    Paul
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    The backplate that you are to use does come with the motherboard and is a
    pressure fit device; it does NOT attach using screws. And, yes, the Asus
    backplates that come with their motherboards work just fine in a wide
    variety of brands of cases.

    --
    DaveW


    "Tony" <nospam@nospam.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:cvq3vr$c3t$1@news6.svr.pol.co.uk...
    > Having decided to build my own PC I have chosen the P4P800 -E/Deluxe
    > mobo,
    > along with a P4 E 3.0G Intel proc and appropriate memory. However, in
    > looking for a nice shiny new case in which to house all this expensive
    > gubbins, I noticed that the ATX input/output backplate (cut-outs for USB,
    > Parallel, Serial, Sound, etc connectors) on all the cases that I looked at
    > were different from the I/O layout on the back of the ASUS mobo. ASUS
    > mobos
    > seem to have substantially more connectors than the standard (?) ATX
    > cut-outs I have seen. I asked a couple of case manufacturers and they told
    > me that the backplates come with the motherboards. I looked at a couple of
    > motherboards at a local shop where a very flimsy plate was supplied but
    > this
    > looked like some kind of screening plate and did not have any fixing holes
    > to screw it to the ATC case aperture. Also several people tell me that
    > cases come with an assortment of backplates.
    >
    > Looking at various cases and motherboards, there seem to be so many
    > different backplate layouts and methods of attaching them to the main
    > case,
    > that I would be surprised if it was possible to make a perfect match
    > without
    > having to resort to drilling, filing and compromising neatness.
    >
    > Can anyone advise before I give up and buy a bare bones, which means major
    > compromises having to be made.
    >
    > Thanks
    > DIY
    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Seems like you spoke to a lot of people and they said
    "The backplate comes with the motherboard"
    Your not going to get a different answer here.

    A basic motherboard (standard io ports, no sound, video, networking) will
    usually fit the bays in the cases. Just buy a case, and buy a motherboard..
    It will work.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    The backplate comes with the motherboard. Put the exisiting backplate out of
    the case and push your new one in

    "Tony" <nospam@nospam.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:cvq3vr$c3t$1@news6.svr.pol.co.uk...
    > Having decided to build my own PC I have chosen the P4P800 -E/Deluxe
    mobo,
    > along with a P4 E 3.0G Intel proc and appropriate memory. However, in
    > looking for a nice shiny new case in which to house all this expensive
    > gubbins, I noticed that the ATX input/output backplate (cut-outs for USB,
    > Parallel, Serial, Sound, etc connectors) on all the cases that I looked at
    > were different from the I/O layout on the back of the ASUS mobo. ASUS
    mobos
    > seem to have substantially more connectors than the standard (?) ATX
    > cut-outs I have seen. I asked a couple of case manufacturers and they told
    > me that the backplates come with the motherboards. I looked at a couple of
    > motherboards at a local shop where a very flimsy plate was supplied but
    this
    > looked like some kind of screening plate and did not have any fixing holes
    > to screw it to the ATC case aperture. Also several people tell me that
    > cases come with an assortment of backplates.
    >
    > Looking at various cases and motherboards, there seem to be so many
    > different backplate layouts and methods of attaching them to the main
    case,
    > that I would be surprised if it was possible to make a perfect match
    without
    > having to resort to drilling, filing and compromising neatness.
    >
    > Can anyone advise before I give up and buy a bare bones, which means major
    > compromises having to be made.
    >
    > Thanks
    > DIY
    >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Many thanks for the definite advice. I wonder why the nice experts at my
    local "Computer Specialists" shop didn't explain this! (perhaps the subject
    of another posting elsewhere some day)? :)
    Thanks again.
    Tony


    "Tony" <nospam@nospam.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:cvq3vr$c3t$1@news6.svr.pol.co.uk...
    > Having decided to build my own PC I have chosen the P4P800 -E/Deluxe
    mobo,
    > along with a P4 E 3.0G Intel proc and appropriate memory. However, in
    > looking for a nice shiny new case in which to house all this expensive
    > gubbins, I noticed that the ATX input/output backplate (cut-outs for USB,
    > Parallel, Serial, Sound, etc connectors) on all the cases that I looked at
    > were different from the I/O layout on the back of the ASUS mobo. ASUS
    mobos
    > seem to have substantially more connectors than the standard (?) ATX
    > cut-outs I have seen. I asked a couple of case manufacturers and they told
    > me that the backplates come with the motherboards. I looked at a couple of
    > motherboards at a local shop where a very flimsy plate was supplied but
    this
    > looked like some kind of screening plate and did not have any fixing holes
    > to screw it to the ATC case aperture. Also several people tell me that
    > cases come with an assortment of backplates.
    >
    > Looking at various cases and motherboards, there seem to be so many
    > different backplate layouts and methods of attaching them to the main
    case,
    > that I would be surprised if it was possible to make a perfect match
    without
    > having to resort to drilling, filing and compromising neatness.
    >
    > Can anyone advise before I give up and buy a bare bones, which means major
    > compromises having to be made.
    >
    > Thanks
    > DIY
    >
    >
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