Memory errors, crashing - Asus P4C800-E deluxe

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

Greetings, I hope someone can help me as I cannot figure this problem out.

My PC intermittently (every day or so, but sometimes after an hour,
sometimes after a few days) crashes, usually during video playback. I use
Zoom media player which will automatically play back the next file in a
directory. Usually the crash occurs following the end of one file's playback
when I'd expect it to simply start on the next file.

When it crashes I get the same memory error in Windows:
***STOP:0x0000007F (0x00000000,0x00000000,0x00000000,0x00000000)
UNEXPECTED_KERNEL_MODE_TRAP Beginning dump of physical memory

Because this is a memory error, I downloaded the Microsoft Windows Memory
Diagnostic tool (http://oca.microsoft.com/en/windiag.asp) to find the fault.

If I run this tool with the Motherboard Bios set to your default settings
(which sets Advanced>Onboard Devices Configuration>Onboard Promise
Controller>Operating Mode>RAID), not all hard disks are identified upon
boot, but the tool says that all memory passes all tests (the tool runs
before the OS is loaded, from a bootable floppy disk).

However, as soon as I change the Operating Mode of the Onboard Promise
Controller to IDE (not the default setting), all hard disks become
identified upon boot, BUT the memory fails all tests. This is the only
configuration that enables me to properly boot and use all drives, though.

I don't know whether the faults are connected however the errors I receive
are memory errors and, it would seem that the only way I can set the Bios to
successfully boot with all drives seen, is to set the Promise Controller to
IDE (I don't use a RAID array) and doing this leads to memory faults being
identified by the Windows Memory Diagnostic tool.

I have tried using different (known good) memory and still get the same
intermittent crashes with the same memory fault.

Motherboard: Asus P4C800-E Deluxe
Bios: 1018
Revision: 2
Video: Asus V9520 Magic NVidia
Driver: 44.03
CPU: Intel Pentium 4 3.066GHz Prescott (800MHz) 1MB cache
Memory: 2 x Geil 512MB DDR PC3200 400MHz running in dual channel mode
OS: Windows 2000

Please can anyone help me to identify the cause and suggest a resolution?
9 answers Last reply
More about memory errors crashing asus p4c800 deluxe
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <422be944$0$24954$ed2e19e4@ptn-nntp-reader04.plus.net>,
    "JustMe" <nospam@here.com> wrote:

    > Greetings, I hope someone can help me as I cannot figure this problem out.
    >
    > My PC intermittently (every day or so, but sometimes after an hour,
    > sometimes after a few days) crashes, usually during video playback. I use
    > Zoom media player which will automatically play back the next file in a
    > directory. Usually the crash occurs following the end of one file's playback
    > when I'd expect it to simply start on the next file.
    >
    > When it crashes I get the same memory error in Windows:
    > ***STOP:0x0000007F (0x00000000,0x00000000,0x00000000,0x00000000)
    > UNEXPECTED_KERNEL_MODE_TRAP Beginning dump of physical memory
    >
    > Because this is a memory error, I downloaded the Microsoft Windows Memory
    > Diagnostic tool (http://oca.microsoft.com/en/windiag.asp) to find the fault.
    >
    > If I run this tool with the Motherboard Bios set to your default settings
    > (which sets Advanced>Onboard Devices Configuration>Onboard Promise
    > Controller>Operating Mode>RAID), not all hard disks are identified upon
    > boot, but the tool says that all memory passes all tests (the tool runs
    > before the OS is loaded, from a bootable floppy disk).
    >
    > However, as soon as I change the Operating Mode of the Onboard Promise
    > Controller to IDE (not the default setting), all hard disks become
    > identified upon boot, BUT the memory fails all tests. This is the only
    > configuration that enables me to properly boot and use all drives, though.
    >
    > I don't know whether the faults are connected however the errors I receive
    > are memory errors and, it would seem that the only way I can set the Bios to
    > successfully boot with all drives seen, is to set the Promise Controller to
    > IDE (I don't use a RAID array) and doing this leads to memory faults being
    > identified by the Windows Memory Diagnostic tool.
    >
    > I have tried using different (known good) memory and still get the same
    > intermittent crashes with the same memory fault.
    >
    > Motherboard: Asus P4C800-E Deluxe
    > Bios: 1018
    > Revision: 2
    > Video: Asus V9520 Magic NVidia
    > Driver: 44.03
    > CPU: Intel Pentium 4 3.066GHz Prescott (800MHz) 1MB cache
    > Memory: 2 x Geil 512MB DDR PC3200 400MHz running in dual channel mode
    > OS: Windows 2000
    >
    > Please can anyone help me to identify the cause and suggest a resolution?

    First, I would get a copy of memtest86 from memtest.org . That program
    will format a blank floppy for you. The floppy has its own boot loader,
    so no OS is needed. Using the floppy route for testing, means the
    code doesn't go near any IDE or SATA controllers. (Set the floppy
    to be first in the boot order.)

    Test the memory with the Promise controller set in both of the
    options you mentioned above.

    My suspicion is you have a bad Promise chip, and need to RMA.
    But perhaps memtest86 will give a different set of symptoms
    and a different conclusion as to where the fault lies. (I'm trying
    to remember now, what the fault was with the 20378. I thought
    some people were getting interrupt storms from faulty chips,
    but I don't remember where I read that.)

    For the memory, a Vdimm setting of at least 2.6V is needed at
    DDR400. You can use 2.75V on just about any memory without
    any consequences to speak of. Sometimes the memory just needs
    a little more voltage to work well.

    HTH,
    Paul
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    "Paul" <nospam@needed.com> wrote in message
    news:nospam-0703050338180001@192.168.1.178...
    > In article <422be944$0$24954$ed2e19e4@ptn-nntp-reader04.plus.net>,
    > "JustMe" <nospam@here.com> wrote:
    >
    > > Greetings, I hope someone can help me as I cannot figure this problem
    out.
    > >
    > > My PC intermittently (every day or so, but sometimes after an hour,
    > > sometimes after a few days) crashes, usually during video playback. I
    use
    > > Zoom media player which will automatically play back the next file in a
    > > directory. Usually the crash occurs following the end of one file's
    playback
    > > when I'd expect it to simply start on the next file.
    > >
    > > When it crashes I get the same memory error in Windows:
    > > ***STOP:0x0000007F (0x00000000,0x00000000,0x00000000,0x00000000)
    > > UNEXPECTED_KERNEL_MODE_TRAP Beginning dump of physical memory
    > >
    > > Because this is a memory error, I downloaded the Microsoft Windows
    Memory
    > > Diagnostic tool (http://oca.microsoft.com/en/windiag.asp) to find the
    fault.
    > >
    > > If I run this tool with the Motherboard Bios set to your default
    settings
    > > (which sets Advanced>Onboard Devices Configuration>Onboard Promise
    > > Controller>Operating Mode>RAID), not all hard disks are identified upon
    > > boot, but the tool says that all memory passes all tests (the tool runs
    > > before the OS is loaded, from a bootable floppy disk).
    > >
    > > However, as soon as I change the Operating Mode of the Onboard Promise
    > > Controller to IDE (not the default setting), all hard disks become
    > > identified upon boot, BUT the memory fails all tests. This is the only
    > > configuration that enables me to properly boot and use all drives,
    though.
    > >
    > > I don't know whether the faults are connected however the errors I
    receive
    > > are memory errors and, it would seem that the only way I can set the
    Bios to
    > > successfully boot with all drives seen, is to set the Promise Controller
    to
    > > IDE (I don't use a RAID array) and doing this leads to memory faults
    being
    > > identified by the Windows Memory Diagnostic tool.
    > >
    > > I have tried using different (known good) memory and still get the same
    > > intermittent crashes with the same memory fault.
    > >
    > > Motherboard: Asus P4C800-E Deluxe
    > > Bios: 1018
    > > Revision: 2
    > > Video: Asus V9520 Magic NVidia
    > > Driver: 44.03
    > > CPU: Intel Pentium 4 3.066GHz Prescott (800MHz) 1MB cache
    > > Memory: 2 x Geil 512MB DDR PC3200 400MHz running in dual channel mode
    > > OS: Windows 2000
    > >
    > > Please can anyone help me to identify the cause and suggest a
    resolution?
    >
    > First, I would get a copy of memtest86 from memtest.org . That program
    > will format a blank floppy for you. The floppy has its own boot loader,
    > so no OS is needed. Using the floppy route for testing, means the
    > code doesn't go near any IDE or SATA controllers. (Set the floppy
    > to be first in the boot order.)
    >
    > Test the memory with the Promise controller set in both of the
    > options you mentioned above.
    >
    > My suspicion is you have a bad Promise chip, and need to RMA.
    > But perhaps memtest86 will give a different set of symptoms
    > and a different conclusion as to where the fault lies. (I'm trying
    > to remember now, what the fault was with the 20378. I thought
    > some people were getting interrupt storms from faulty chips,
    > but I don't remember where I read that.)
    >
    > For the memory, a Vdimm setting of at least 2.6V is needed at
    > DDR400. You can use 2.75V on just about any memory without
    > any consequences to speak of. Sometimes the memory just needs
    > a little more voltage to work well.
    >
    > HTH,
    > Paul

    Hi Paul,

    Thanks for your help.

    I did as you advised and tried Memtest. It found no fault with the memory
    with the controller in IDE mode - contradicting the Microsoft test. I reran
    the MS test under the same conditions and it still reported errors :o/

    I'm not familiar with the faults you describe above but the only memory
    setting I could find was under Voltages where there is a VCore st to 1.73
    volts. This can be switched to "Disabled" but I see no means to increment
    the voltage nor enter my own setting.

    Could a low setting here be the cause of the faults I am experiencing and,
    if so, how/where do I adjust this - I cannot see a means in the Bios, beyond
    switching between a predefined voltage and "Disabled". Or am I looking at
    completely the wrong setting?
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    "JustMe" <nospam@here.com> wrote in message
    news:422c9305$0$8210$ed2619ec@ptn-nntp-reader02.plus.net...
    >
    > "Paul" <nospam@needed.com> wrote in message
    > news:nospam-0703050338180001@192.168.1.178...
    > > In article <422be944$0$24954$ed2e19e4@ptn-nntp-reader04.plus.net>,
    > > "JustMe" <nospam@here.com> wrote:
    > >
    > > > Greetings, I hope someone can help me as I cannot figure this problem
    > out.
    > > >
    > > > My PC intermittently (every day or so, but sometimes after an hour,
    > > > sometimes after a few days) crashes, usually during video playback. I
    > use
    > > > Zoom media player which will automatically play back the next file in
    a
    > > > directory. Usually the crash occurs following the end of one file's
    > playback
    > > > when I'd expect it to simply start on the next file.
    > > >
    > > > When it crashes I get the same memory error in Windows:
    > > > ***STOP:0x0000007F (0x00000000,0x00000000,0x00000000,0x00000000)
    > > > UNEXPECTED_KERNEL_MODE_TRAP Beginning dump of physical memory
    > > >
    > > > Because this is a memory error, I downloaded the Microsoft Windows
    > Memory
    > > > Diagnostic tool (http://oca.microsoft.com/en/windiag.asp) to find the
    > fault.
    > > >
    > > > If I run this tool with the Motherboard Bios set to your default
    > settings
    > > > (which sets Advanced>Onboard Devices Configuration>Onboard Promise
    > > > Controller>Operating Mode>RAID), not all hard disks are identified
    upon
    > > > boot, but the tool says that all memory passes all tests (the tool
    runs
    > > > before the OS is loaded, from a bootable floppy disk).
    > > >
    > > > However, as soon as I change the Operating Mode of the Onboard Promise
    > > > Controller to IDE (not the default setting), all hard disks become
    > > > identified upon boot, BUT the memory fails all tests. This is the only
    > > > configuration that enables me to properly boot and use all drives,
    > though.
    > > >
    > > > I don't know whether the faults are connected however the errors I
    > receive
    > > > are memory errors and, it would seem that the only way I can set the
    > Bios to
    > > > successfully boot with all drives seen, is to set the Promise
    Controller
    > to
    > > > IDE (I don't use a RAID array) and doing this leads to memory faults
    > being
    > > > identified by the Windows Memory Diagnostic tool.
    > > >
    > > > I have tried using different (known good) memory and still get the
    same
    > > > intermittent crashes with the same memory fault.
    > > >
    > > > Motherboard: Asus P4C800-E Deluxe
    > > > Bios: 1018
    > > > Revision: 2
    > > > Video: Asus V9520 Magic NVidia
    > > > Driver: 44.03
    > > > CPU: Intel Pentium 4 3.066GHz Prescott (800MHz) 1MB cache
    > > > Memory: 2 x Geil 512MB DDR PC3200 400MHz running in dual channel mode
    > > > OS: Windows 2000
    > > >
    > > > Please can anyone help me to identify the cause and suggest a
    > resolution?
    > >
    > > First, I would get a copy of memtest86 from memtest.org . That program
    > > will format a blank floppy for you. The floppy has its own boot loader,
    > > so no OS is needed. Using the floppy route for testing, means the
    > > code doesn't go near any IDE or SATA controllers. (Set the floppy
    > > to be first in the boot order.)
    > >
    > > Test the memory with the Promise controller set in both of the
    > > options you mentioned above.
    > >
    > > My suspicion is you have a bad Promise chip, and need to RMA.
    > > But perhaps memtest86 will give a different set of symptoms
    > > and a different conclusion as to where the fault lies. (I'm trying
    > > to remember now, what the fault was with the 20378. I thought
    > > some people were getting interrupt storms from faulty chips,
    > > but I don't remember where I read that.)
    > >
    > > For the memory, a Vdimm setting of at least 2.6V is needed at
    > > DDR400. You can use 2.75V on just about any memory without
    > > any consequences to speak of. Sometimes the memory just needs
    > > a little more voltage to work well.
    > >
    > > HTH,
    > > Paul
    >
    > Hi Paul,
    >
    > Thanks for your help.
    >
    > I did as you advised and tried Memtest. It found no fault with the memory
    > with the controller in IDE mode - contradicting the Microsoft test. I
    reran
    > the MS test under the same conditions and it still reported errors :o/
    >
    > I'm not familiar with the faults you describe above but the only memory
    > setting I could find was under Voltages where there is a VCore st to 1.73
    > volts. This can be switched to "Disabled" but I see no means to increment
    > the voltage nor enter my own setting.
    >
    > Could a low setting here be the cause of the faults I am experiencing and,
    > if so, how/where do I adjust this - I cannot see a means in the Bios,
    beyond
    > switching between a predefined voltage and "Disabled". Or am I looking at
    > completely the wrong setting?

    Whoops - posted before complete.
    I've found the setting and am now trying at 2.75 volts. Same questions
    apply.
    Cheers.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <422c9305$0$8210$ed2619ec@ptn-nntp-reader02.plus.net>, "JustMe"
    <nospam@here.com> wrote:

    > "Paul" <nospam@needed.com> wrote in message
    > news:nospam-0703050338180001@192.168.1.178...
    > > In article <422be944$0$24954$ed2e19e4@ptn-nntp-reader04.plus.net>,
    > > "JustMe" <nospam@here.com> wrote:
    > >
    > > > Greetings, I hope someone can help me as I cannot figure
    > > > this problem out.
    > > >
    > > > My PC intermittently (every day or so, but sometimes after an
    > > > hour, sometimes after a few days) crashes, usually during
    > > > video playback. I use Zoom media player which will
    > > > automatically play back the next file in a directory. Usually
    > > > the crash occurs following the end of one file's playback
    > > > when I'd expect it to simply start on the next file.
    > > >
    > > > When it crashes I get the same memory error in Windows:
    > > > ***STOP:0x0000007F (0x00000000,0x00000000,0x00000000,0x00000000)
    > > > UNEXPECTED_KERNEL_MODE_TRAP Beginning dump of physical memory
    > > >
    > > > Because this is a memory error, I downloaded the Microsoft
    > > > Windows Memory Diagnostic tool
    > > > (http://oca.microsoft.com/en/windiag.asp) to find the fault.
    > > >
    > > > If I run this tool with the Motherboard Bios set to your
    > > > default settings (which sets Advanced>Onboard Devices
    > > > Configuration>Onboard Promise Controller>Operating Mode>RAID),
    > > > not all hard disks are identified upon boot, but the tool
    > > > says that all memory passes all tests (the tool runs
    > > > before the OS is loaded, from a bootable floppy disk).
    > > >
    > > > However, as soon as I change the Operating Mode of the
    > > > Onboard Promise Controller to IDE (not the default setting),
    > > > all hard disks become identified upon boot, BUT the memory
    > > > fails all tests. This is the only configuration that enables
    > > > me to properly boot and use all drives, though.
    > > >
    > > > I don't know whether the faults are connected however the
    > > > errors I receive are memory errors and, it would seem that
    > > > the only way I can set the Bios to successfully boot with
    > > > all drives seen, is to set the Promise Controller to
    > > > IDE (I don't use a RAID array) and doing this leads to
    > > > memory faults being identified by the Windows Memory
    > > > Diagnostic tool.
    > > >
    > > > I have tried using different (known good) memory and still
    > > > get the same intermittent crashes with the same memory fault.
    > > >
    > > > Motherboard: Asus P4C800-E Deluxe
    > > > Bios: 1018
    > > > Revision: 2
    > > > Video: Asus V9520 Magic NVidia
    > > > Driver: 44.03
    > > > CPU: Intel Pentium 4 3.066GHz Prescott (800MHz) 1MB cache
    > > > Memory: 2 x Geil 512MB DDR PC3200 400MHz running in dual
    > > > channel mode
    > > > OS: Windows 2000
    > > >
    > > > Please can anyone help me to identify the cause and suggest
    > > > a resolution?
    > >
    > > First, I would get a copy of memtest86 from memtest.org . That
    > > program will format a blank floppy for you. The floppy has its
    > > own boot loader, so no OS is needed. Using the floppy route for
    > > testing, means the code doesn't go near any IDE or SATA
    > > controllers. (Set the floppy to be first in the boot order.)
    > >
    > > Test the memory with the Promise controller set in both of the
    > > options you mentioned above.
    > >
    > > My suspicion is you have a bad Promise chip, and need to RMA.
    > > But perhaps memtest86 will give a different set of symptoms
    > > and a different conclusion as to where the fault lies. (I'm
    > > trying to remember now, what the fault was with the 20378.
    > > I thought some people were getting interrupt storms from
    > > faulty chips, but I don't remember where I read that.)
    > >
    > > For the memory, a Vdimm setting of at least 2.6V is needed at
    > > DDR400. You can use 2.75V on just about any memory without
    > > any consequences to speak of. Sometimes the memory just needs
    > > a little more voltage to work well.
    > >
    > > HTH,
    > > Paul
    >
    > Hi Paul,
    >
    > Thanks for your help.
    >
    > I did as you advised and tried Memtest. It found no fault with
    > the memory with the controller in IDE mode - contradicting the
    > Microsoft test. I reran the MS test under the same conditions
    > and it still reported errors :o/
    >
    > I'm not familiar with the faults you describe above but the
    > only memory setting I could find was under Voltages where
    > there is a VCore st to 1.73 volts. This can be switched to
    > "Disabled" but I see no means to increment the voltage nor
    > enter my own setting.
    >
    > Could a low setting here be the cause of the faults I am
    > experiencing and, if so, how/where do I adjust this - I cannot
    > see a means in the Bios, beyond switching between a predefined
    > voltage and "Disabled". Or am I looking at completely the
    > wrong setting?

    OK. The memory test results tell me your memory is not at fault,
    so you don't need any extra voltage. (It would only be a waste.)
    While it is not a complete test, I would say your processor Vcore
    doesn't need to be adjusted either, because to complete the
    memtest86 program, the processor has to be stable as well.

    I would say your problem is disk related. When comparing the
    potential reliability of the Promise chip, to those rotating
    disk drive mechanisms, it is more likely you have a disk problem.

    Do you have some kind of fancy "swap file" setup ? Maybe the disk
    with the system swap on it is actually at fault ? (Like an errored
    sector in the swap file area.) If this was my system, I would
    back up the data on each drive, and then find a disk test that
    includes write operations to the entire disk. The manufacturer's
    test utilities aren't as a general rule, very thorough, but
    would be a good place to start (they are free, after all).
    A non-destructive test does nothing but read operations, and
    doesn't test the ability to write any data. It is also possible
    a simple surface scan for read errors, will give you some ideas
    as to how healthy the disk is.

    To test the disk controllers, you would need a disk utility that
    works properly, whether the disk is on the Southbridge or
    the disk is on the Promise controller. Run the test twice,
    once on one controller and again on the other controller. If
    the results diverge wildly (pass on one interface, fail
    badly on the other), it may be time to RMA the motherboard under
    warranty.

    If I had to guess, you have a bad disk. You could also have a
    bad power supply. Some disks are pretty sensitive to low
    voltage from the PSU, so take a look at +5V and +12V using
    Asus Probe, while the system is running something like
    the Prime95 torture test (mersenne.org). Most power supplies
    regulate to 5%, so if your +12V is, say, less than +11V, or
    the +5V is less than +4.7V as measured by Asus Probe, you
    might want to try another power supply and repeat your disk
    tests. (I am allowing more than a 5% error here, because
    the monitor chip has some potential for measurement error as
    well, and I wouldn't want to condemn the power supply, if the
    monitor chip is reading slightly on the low side. A cheap
    digital multimeter can also be used to verify the voltages.)

    Testing disks is no fun, but it is better to catch a bad disk
    problem, before you lose some data.

    HTH,
    Paul
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    "JustMe" <nospam@here.com> wrote in message
    news:422c935f$0$8210$ed2619ec@ptn-nntp-reader02.plus.net...
    >
    > "JustMe" <nospam@here.com> wrote in message
    > news:422c9305$0$8210$ed2619ec@ptn-nntp-reader02.plus.net...
    > >
    > > "Paul" <nospam@needed.com> wrote in message
    > > news:nospam-0703050338180001@192.168.1.178...
    > > > In article <422be944$0$24954$ed2e19e4@ptn-nntp-reader04.plus.net>,
    > > > "JustMe" <nospam@here.com> wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > Greetings, I hope someone can help me as I cannot figure this
    problem
    > > out.
    > > > >
    > > > > My PC intermittently (every day or so, but sometimes after an hour,
    > > > > sometimes after a few days) crashes, usually during video playback.
    I
    > > use
    > > > > Zoom media player which will automatically play back the next file
    in
    > a
    > > > > directory. Usually the crash occurs following the end of one file's
    > > playback
    > > > > when I'd expect it to simply start on the next file.
    > > > >
    > > > > When it crashes I get the same memory error in Windows:
    > > > > ***STOP:0x0000007F (0x00000000,0x00000000,0x00000000,0x00000000)
    > > > > UNEXPECTED_KERNEL_MODE_TRAP Beginning dump of physical memory
    > > > >
    > > > > Because this is a memory error, I downloaded the Microsoft Windows
    > > Memory
    > > > > Diagnostic tool (http://oca.microsoft.com/en/windiag.asp) to find
    the
    > > fault.
    > > > >
    > > > > If I run this tool with the Motherboard Bios set to your default
    > > settings
    > > > > (which sets Advanced>Onboard Devices Configuration>Onboard Promise
    > > > > Controller>Operating Mode>RAID), not all hard disks are identified
    > upon
    > > > > boot, but the tool says that all memory passes all tests (the tool
    > runs
    > > > > before the OS is loaded, from a bootable floppy disk).
    > > > >
    > > > > However, as soon as I change the Operating Mode of the Onboard
    Promise
    > > > > Controller to IDE (not the default setting), all hard disks become
    > > > > identified upon boot, BUT the memory fails all tests. This is the
    only
    > > > > configuration that enables me to properly boot and use all drives,
    > > though.
    > > > >
    > > > > I don't know whether the faults are connected however the errors I
    > > receive
    > > > > are memory errors and, it would seem that the only way I can set the
    > > Bios to
    > > > > successfully boot with all drives seen, is to set the Promise
    > Controller
    > > to
    > > > > IDE (I don't use a RAID array) and doing this leads to memory faults
    > > being
    > > > > identified by the Windows Memory Diagnostic tool.
    > > > >
    > > > > I have tried using different (known good) memory and still get the
    > same
    > > > > intermittent crashes with the same memory fault.
    > > > >
    > > > > Motherboard: Asus P4C800-E Deluxe
    > > > > Bios: 1018
    > > > > Revision: 2
    > > > > Video: Asus V9520 Magic NVidia
    > > > > Driver: 44.03
    > > > > CPU: Intel Pentium 4 3.066GHz Prescott (800MHz) 1MB cache
    > > > > Memory: 2 x Geil 512MB DDR PC3200 400MHz running in dual channel
    mode
    > > > > OS: Windows 2000
    > > > >
    > > > > Please can anyone help me to identify the cause and suggest a
    > > resolution?
    > > >
    > > > First, I would get a copy of memtest86 from memtest.org . That program
    > > > will format a blank floppy for you. The floppy has its own boot
    loader,
    > > > so no OS is needed. Using the floppy route for testing, means the
    > > > code doesn't go near any IDE or SATA controllers. (Set the floppy
    > > > to be first in the boot order.)
    > > >
    > > > Test the memory with the Promise controller set in both of the
    > > > options you mentioned above.
    > > >
    > > > My suspicion is you have a bad Promise chip, and need to RMA.
    > > > But perhaps memtest86 will give a different set of symptoms
    > > > and a different conclusion as to where the fault lies. (I'm trying
    > > > to remember now, what the fault was with the 20378. I thought
    > > > some people were getting interrupt storms from faulty chips,
    > > > but I don't remember where I read that.)
    > > >
    > > > For the memory, a Vdimm setting of at least 2.6V is needed at
    > > > DDR400. You can use 2.75V on just about any memory without
    > > > any consequences to speak of. Sometimes the memory just needs
    > > > a little more voltage to work well.
    > > >
    > > > HTH,
    > > > Paul
    > >
    > > Hi Paul,
    > >
    > > Thanks for your help.
    > >
    > > I did as you advised and tried Memtest. It found no fault with the
    memory
    > > with the controller in IDE mode - contradicting the Microsoft test. I
    > reran
    > > the MS test under the same conditions and it still reported errors :o/
    > >
    > > I'm not familiar with the faults you describe above but the only memory
    > > setting I could find was under Voltages where there is a VCore st to
    1.73
    > > volts. This can be switched to "Disabled" but I see no means to
    increment
    > > the voltage nor enter my own setting.
    > >
    > > Could a low setting here be the cause of the faults I am experiencing
    and,
    > > if so, how/where do I adjust this - I cannot see a means in the Bios,
    > beyond
    > > switching between a predefined voltage and "Disabled". Or am I looking
    at
    > > completely the wrong setting?
    >
    > Whoops - posted before complete.
    > I've found the setting and am now trying at 2.75 volts. Same questions
    > apply.
    > Cheers.
    >
    Still getting the same problem :o(
    What else would you suggest I check?
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    STOP 7f does not strictly indicate a memory fault (that is one of several
    possibilities).

    Try a google on "STOP 0x0000007f" (without the quotes).

    Note that you indicate that the first parameter to the stop is 0x00000000,
    not 0x00000008 (which indicates double fault - a somewhat different problem)
    as mentioned in many of the googled articles.

    There is some good news on this page:

    http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/Windows/XP/all/reskit/en-us/Default.asp?url=/resources/documentation/Windows/XP/all/reskit/en-us/prmd_stp_ukdq.asp

    It says if Parameter 1 is Zero ==> Divide by zero error which could be a
    driver fault, some other hardware fault (EG the device controllers you
    mention before) or a number of other things. Quote "0x00000000, or a divide
    by zero error, occurs when a divide (DIV) instruction is run and the divisor
    is 0. Memory corruption, other hardware failures, or software problems can
    cause this message. ". This makes me think stuffed driver, stuffed
    controller, or stuffed up bios / firmware / settings.

    Have you tried clearing the BIOS using the reset procedure? This would be my
    first step. Also check the RAM is running at the correct voltage (usually
    default + 0.1v - this will do no harm to any ram).

    The fact you have issues with the promise controller tends to indicate
    either a BIOS, Controller Firmware, or Electronic fault problem. If you can,
    can you use a controller other than the promise and disable it?

    - Tim


    "JustMe" <nospam@here.com> wrote in message
    news:422be944$0$24954$ed2e19e4@ptn-nntp-reader04.plus.net...
    > Greetings, I hope someone can help me as I cannot figure this problem out.
    >
    > My PC intermittently (every day or so, but sometimes after an hour,
    > sometimes after a few days) crashes, usually during video playback. I use
    > Zoom media player which will automatically play back the next file in a
    > directory. Usually the crash occurs following the end of one file's
    > playback
    > when I'd expect it to simply start on the next file.
    >
    > When it crashes I get the same memory error in Windows:
    > ***STOP:0x0000007F (0x00000000,0x00000000,0x00000000,0x00000000)
    > UNEXPECTED_KERNEL_MODE_TRAP Beginning dump of physical memory
    >
    > Because this is a memory error, I downloaded the Microsoft Windows Memory
    > Diagnostic tool (http://oca.microsoft.com/en/windiag.asp) to find the
    > fault.
    >
    > If I run this tool with the Motherboard Bios set to your default settings
    > (which sets Advanced>Onboard Devices Configuration>Onboard Promise
    > Controller>Operating Mode>RAID), not all hard disks are identified upon
    > boot, but the tool says that all memory passes all tests (the tool runs
    > before the OS is loaded, from a bootable floppy disk).
    >
    > However, as soon as I change the Operating Mode of the Onboard Promise
    > Controller to IDE (not the default setting), all hard disks become
    > identified upon boot, BUT the memory fails all tests. This is the only
    > configuration that enables me to properly boot and use all drives, though.
    >
    > I don't know whether the faults are connected however the errors I receive
    > are memory errors and, it would seem that the only way I can set the Bios
    > to
    > successfully boot with all drives seen, is to set the Promise Controller
    > to
    > IDE (I don't use a RAID array) and doing this leads to memory faults being
    > identified by the Windows Memory Diagnostic tool.
    >
    > I have tried using different (known good) memory and still get the same
    > intermittent crashes with the same memory fault.
    >
    > Motherboard: Asus P4C800-E Deluxe
    > Bios: 1018
    > Revision: 2
    > Video: Asus V9520 Magic NVidia
    > Driver: 44.03
    > CPU: Intel Pentium 4 3.066GHz Prescott (800MHz) 1MB cache
    > Memory: 2 x Geil 512MB DDR PC3200 400MHz running in dual channel mode
    > OS: Windows 2000
    >
    > Please can anyone help me to identify the cause and suggest a resolution?
    >
    >
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Hi Tim,

    Thanks for the advice.

    I'm starting to think that the Promise Controller isn't the issue. The
    reason I linked that to a potential fault initially, was because the MS
    Memory Test utility wouldn't pass the memory with the controller set to IDE.
    But the utility suggested by Paul (above) passed it just fine, set to IDE.

    However your talk of drivers has set me thinking.

    I can now predictably cause a crash. Here's how:

    Boot into Windows 2000.

    Start viewing video using Zoom player.

    My video card is set to "Clone". This has the effect of delivering a
    full-screen output of whatever video window is being played at the time, via
    the video card's composite or S-Video outputs.

    Normally I can then minimise Zoom, leave it running in the background with
    the video happily rendered on the TV screen. However I am finding that if I
    restore the Zoom player to the front, my PC crashes. For a while I linked
    this to Zoom starting to play a new file, as I would tend to bring zoom back
    for the start of playing back the next file, usually to adjust the volume.

    So I'm going to try reinstalling the drivers for the video card and see
    where that gets me...

    Thanks to you both - BRB!


    "Tim" <Tim@NoSpam.com> wrote in message news:d0itcf$ptt$1@lust.ihug.co.nz...
    > STOP 7f does not strictly indicate a memory fault (that is one of several
    > possibilities).
    >
    > Try a google on "STOP 0x0000007f" (without the quotes).
    >
    > Note that you indicate that the first parameter to the stop is 0x00000000,
    > not 0x00000008 (which indicates double fault - a somewhat different
    problem)
    > as mentioned in many of the googled articles.
    >
    > There is some good news on this page:
    >
    >
    http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/Windows/XP/all/reskit/en-us/Default.asp?url=/resources/documentation/Windows/XP/all/reskit/en-us/prmd_stp_ukdq.asp
    >
    > It says if Parameter 1 is Zero ==> Divide by zero error which could be a
    > driver fault, some other hardware fault (EG the device controllers you
    > mention before) or a number of other things. Quote "0x00000000, or a
    divide
    > by zero error, occurs when a divide (DIV) instruction is run and the
    divisor
    > is 0. Memory corruption, other hardware failures, or software problems can
    > cause this message. ". This makes me think stuffed driver, stuffed
    > controller, or stuffed up bios / firmware / settings.
    >
    > Have you tried clearing the BIOS using the reset procedure? This would be
    my
    > first step. Also check the RAM is running at the correct voltage (usually
    > default + 0.1v - this will do no harm to any ram).
    >
    > The fact you have issues with the promise controller tends to indicate
    > either a BIOS, Controller Firmware, or Electronic fault problem. If you
    can,
    > can you use a controller other than the promise and disable it?
    >
    > - Tim
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "JustMe" <nospam@here.com> wrote in message
    > news:422be944$0$24954$ed2e19e4@ptn-nntp-reader04.plus.net...
    > > Greetings, I hope someone can help me as I cannot figure this problem
    out.
    > >
    > > My PC intermittently (every day or so, but sometimes after an hour,
    > > sometimes after a few days) crashes, usually during video playback. I
    use
    > > Zoom media player which will automatically play back the next file in a
    > > directory. Usually the crash occurs following the end of one file's
    > > playback
    > > when I'd expect it to simply start on the next file.
    > >
    > > When it crashes I get the same memory error in Windows:
    > > ***STOP:0x0000007F (0x00000000,0x00000000,0x00000000,0x00000000)
    > > UNEXPECTED_KERNEL_MODE_TRAP Beginning dump of physical memory
    > >
    > > Because this is a memory error, I downloaded the Microsoft Windows
    Memory
    > > Diagnostic tool (http://oca.microsoft.com/en/windiag.asp) to find the
    > > fault.
    > >
    > > If I run this tool with the Motherboard Bios set to your default
    settings
    > > (which sets Advanced>Onboard Devices Configuration>Onboard Promise
    > > Controller>Operating Mode>RAID), not all hard disks are identified upon
    > > boot, but the tool says that all memory passes all tests (the tool runs
    > > before the OS is loaded, from a bootable floppy disk).
    > >
    > > However, as soon as I change the Operating Mode of the Onboard Promise
    > > Controller to IDE (not the default setting), all hard disks become
    > > identified upon boot, BUT the memory fails all tests. This is the only
    > > configuration that enables me to properly boot and use all drives,
    though.
    > >
    > > I don't know whether the faults are connected however the errors I
    receive
    > > are memory errors and, it would seem that the only way I can set the
    Bios
    > > to
    > > successfully boot with all drives seen, is to set the Promise Controller
    > > to
    > > IDE (I don't use a RAID array) and doing this leads to memory faults
    being
    > > identified by the Windows Memory Diagnostic tool.
    > >
    > > I have tried using different (known good) memory and still get the same
    > > intermittent crashes with the same memory fault.
    > >
    > > Motherboard: Asus P4C800-E Deluxe
    > > Bios: 1018
    > > Revision: 2
    > > Video: Asus V9520 Magic NVidia
    > > Driver: 44.03
    > > CPU: Intel Pentium 4 3.066GHz Prescott (800MHz) 1MB cache
    > > Memory: 2 x Geil 512MB DDR PC3200 400MHz running in dual channel mode
    > > OS: Windows 2000
    > >
    > > Please can anyone help me to identify the cause and suggest a
    resolution?
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Well, that does make me think that the problem lies around the graphics
    drivers / zoom software (I am not familiar with it).

    As a general rule, if memtest86 does not report errors after 5 full runs
    then your memory is ok.

    It is always possible that the graphics card has faulty video ram, so if you
    have an alternative graphics card - known good - then give that a blast.

    - Tim


    "JustMe" <no@spam.thanks> wrote in message
    news:422d0e37$0$87553$ed2619ec@ptn-nntp-reader01.plus.net...
    > Hi Tim,
    >
    > Thanks for the advice.
    >
    > I'm starting to think that the Promise Controller isn't the issue. The
    > reason I linked that to a potential fault initially, was because the MS
    > Memory Test utility wouldn't pass the memory with the controller set to
    > IDE.
    > But the utility suggested by Paul (above) passed it just fine, set to IDE.
    >
    > However your talk of drivers has set me thinking.
    >
    > I can now predictably cause a crash. Here's how:
    >
    > Boot into Windows 2000.
    >
    > Start viewing video using Zoom player.
    >
    > My video card is set to "Clone". This has the effect of delivering a
    > full-screen output of whatever video window is being played at the time,
    > via
    > the video card's composite or S-Video outputs.
    >
    > Normally I can then minimise Zoom, leave it running in the background with
    > the video happily rendered on the TV screen. However I am finding that if
    > I
    > restore the Zoom player to the front, my PC crashes. For a while I linked
    > this to Zoom starting to play a new file, as I would tend to bring zoom
    > back
    > for the start of playing back the next file, usually to adjust the volume.
    >
    > So I'm going to try reinstalling the drivers for the video card and see
    > where that gets me...
    >
    > Thanks to you both - BRB!
    >
    >
    > "Tim" <Tim@NoSpam.com> wrote in message
    > news:d0itcf$ptt$1@lust.ihug.co.nz...
    >> STOP 7f does not strictly indicate a memory fault (that is one of several
    >> possibilities).
    >>
    >> Try a google on "STOP 0x0000007f" (without the quotes).
    >>
    >> Note that you indicate that the first parameter to the stop is
    >> 0x00000000,
    >> not 0x00000008 (which indicates double fault - a somewhat different
    > problem)
    >> as mentioned in many of the googled articles.
    >>
    >> There is some good news on this page:
    >>
    >>
    > http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/Windows/XP/all/reskit/en-us/Default.asp?url=/resources/documentation/Windows/XP/all/reskit/en-us/prmd_stp_ukdq.asp
    >>
    >> It says if Parameter 1 is Zero ==> Divide by zero error which could be a
    >> driver fault, some other hardware fault (EG the device controllers you
    >> mention before) or a number of other things. Quote "0x00000000, or a
    > divide
    >> by zero error, occurs when a divide (DIV) instruction is run and the
    > divisor
    >> is 0. Memory corruption, other hardware failures, or software problems
    >> can
    >> cause this message. ". This makes me think stuffed driver, stuffed
    >> controller, or stuffed up bios / firmware / settings.
    >>
    >> Have you tried clearing the BIOS using the reset procedure? This would be
    > my
    >> first step. Also check the RAM is running at the correct voltage (usually
    >> default + 0.1v - this will do no harm to any ram).
    >>
    >> The fact you have issues with the promise controller tends to indicate
    >> either a BIOS, Controller Firmware, or Electronic fault problem. If you
    > can,
    >> can you use a controller other than the promise and disable it?
    >>
    >> - Tim
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> "JustMe" <nospam@here.com> wrote in message
    >> news:422be944$0$24954$ed2e19e4@ptn-nntp-reader04.plus.net...
    >> > Greetings, I hope someone can help me as I cannot figure this problem
    > out.
    >> >
    >> > My PC intermittently (every day or so, but sometimes after an hour,
    >> > sometimes after a few days) crashes, usually during video playback. I
    > use
    >> > Zoom media player which will automatically play back the next file in a
    >> > directory. Usually the crash occurs following the end of one file's
    >> > playback
    >> > when I'd expect it to simply start on the next file.
    >> >
    >> > When it crashes I get the same memory error in Windows:
    >> > ***STOP:0x0000007F (0x00000000,0x00000000,0x00000000,0x00000000)
    >> > UNEXPECTED_KERNEL_MODE_TRAP Beginning dump of physical memory
    >> >
    >> > Because this is a memory error, I downloaded the Microsoft Windows
    > Memory
    >> > Diagnostic tool (http://oca.microsoft.com/en/windiag.asp) to find the
    >> > fault.
    >> >
    >> > If I run this tool with the Motherboard Bios set to your default
    > settings
    >> > (which sets Advanced>Onboard Devices Configuration>Onboard Promise
    >> > Controller>Operating Mode>RAID), not all hard disks are identified upon
    >> > boot, but the tool says that all memory passes all tests (the tool runs
    >> > before the OS is loaded, from a bootable floppy disk).
    >> >
    >> > However, as soon as I change the Operating Mode of the Onboard Promise
    >> > Controller to IDE (not the default setting), all hard disks become
    >> > identified upon boot, BUT the memory fails all tests. This is the only
    >> > configuration that enables me to properly boot and use all drives,
    > though.
    >> >
    >> > I don't know whether the faults are connected however the errors I
    > receive
    >> > are memory errors and, it would seem that the only way I can set the
    > Bios
    >> > to
    >> > successfully boot with all drives seen, is to set the Promise
    >> > Controller
    >> > to
    >> > IDE (I don't use a RAID array) and doing this leads to memory faults
    > being
    >> > identified by the Windows Memory Diagnostic tool.
    >> >
    >> > I have tried using different (known good) memory and still get the same
    >> > intermittent crashes with the same memory fault.
    >> >
    >> > Motherboard: Asus P4C800-E Deluxe
    >> > Bios: 1018
    >> > Revision: 2
    >> > Video: Asus V9520 Magic NVidia
    >> > Driver: 44.03
    >> > CPU: Intel Pentium 4 3.066GHz Prescott (800MHz) 1MB cache
    >> > Memory: 2 x Geil 512MB DDR PC3200 400MHz running in dual channel mode
    >> > OS: Windows 2000
    >> >
    >> > Please can anyone help me to identify the cause and suggest a
    > resolution?
    >> >
    >> >
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Well, I've worked backwards. I was getting crashes with video and also when
    I disabled the USB ADSL modem, I found.

    So I ripped out the only non-essential card (Compro DTV card which has been
    a pain anyway), uninstalled it and its drivers, uninstalled USB modem
    removed drivers and uninstalled/reinstalled video drivers.

    Since then it's been OK with no crashes, although I'll give it a couple of
    weeks before I'm certain that the problems have been eliminated, but it's
    been good so far.

    Thanks for advice so far - I'm sure I'll be back!

    Cheers.


    "Tim" <Tim@NoSpam.com> wrote in message news:d0j3mh$u2g$1@lust.ihug.co.nz...
    > Well, that does make me think that the problem lies around the graphics
    > drivers / zoom software (I am not familiar with it).
    >
    > As a general rule, if memtest86 does not report errors after 5 full runs
    > then your memory is ok.
    >
    > It is always possible that the graphics card has faulty video ram, so if
    you
    > have an alternative graphics card - known good - then give that a blast.
    >
    > - Tim
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "JustMe" <no@spam.thanks> wrote in message
    > news:422d0e37$0$87553$ed2619ec@ptn-nntp-reader01.plus.net...
    > > Hi Tim,
    > >
    > > Thanks for the advice.
    > >
    > > I'm starting to think that the Promise Controller isn't the issue. The
    > > reason I linked that to a potential fault initially, was because the MS
    > > Memory Test utility wouldn't pass the memory with the controller set to
    > > IDE.
    > > But the utility suggested by Paul (above) passed it just fine, set to
    IDE.
    > >
    > > However your talk of drivers has set me thinking.
    > >
    > > I can now predictably cause a crash. Here's how:
    > >
    > > Boot into Windows 2000.
    > >
    > > Start viewing video using Zoom player.
    > >
    > > My video card is set to "Clone". This has the effect of delivering a
    > > full-screen output of whatever video window is being played at the time,
    > > via
    > > the video card's composite or S-Video outputs.
    > >
    > > Normally I can then minimise Zoom, leave it running in the background
    with
    > > the video happily rendered on the TV screen. However I am finding that
    if
    > > I
    > > restore the Zoom player to the front, my PC crashes. For a while I
    linked
    > > this to Zoom starting to play a new file, as I would tend to bring zoom
    > > back
    > > for the start of playing back the next file, usually to adjust the
    volume.
    > >
    > > So I'm going to try reinstalling the drivers for the video card and see
    > > where that gets me...
    > >
    > > Thanks to you both - BRB!
    > >
    > >
    > > "Tim" <Tim@NoSpam.com> wrote in message
    > > news:d0itcf$ptt$1@lust.ihug.co.nz...
    > >> STOP 7f does not strictly indicate a memory fault (that is one of
    several
    > >> possibilities).
    > >>
    > >> Try a google on "STOP 0x0000007f" (without the quotes).
    > >>
    > >> Note that you indicate that the first parameter to the stop is
    > >> 0x00000000,
    > >> not 0x00000008 (which indicates double fault - a somewhat different
    > > problem)
    > >> as mentioned in many of the googled articles.
    > >>
    > >> There is some good news on this page:
    > >>
    > >>
    > >
    http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/Windows/XP/all/reskit/en-us/Default.asp?url=/resources/documentation/Windows/XP/all/reskit/en-us/prmd_stp_ukdq.asp
    > >>
    > >> It says if Parameter 1 is Zero ==> Divide by zero error which could be
    a
    > >> driver fault, some other hardware fault (EG the device controllers you
    > >> mention before) or a number of other things. Quote "0x00000000, or a
    > > divide
    > >> by zero error, occurs when a divide (DIV) instruction is run and the
    > > divisor
    > >> is 0. Memory corruption, other hardware failures, or software problems
    > >> can
    > >> cause this message. ". This makes me think stuffed driver, stuffed
    > >> controller, or stuffed up bios / firmware / settings.
    > >>
    > >> Have you tried clearing the BIOS using the reset procedure? This would
    be
    > > my
    > >> first step. Also check the RAM is running at the correct voltage
    (usually
    > >> default + 0.1v - this will do no harm to any ram).
    > >>
    > >> The fact you have issues with the promise controller tends to indicate
    > >> either a BIOS, Controller Firmware, or Electronic fault problem. If you
    > > can,
    > >> can you use a controller other than the promise and disable it?
    > >>
    > >> - Tim
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> "JustMe" <nospam@here.com> wrote in message
    > >> news:422be944$0$24954$ed2e19e4@ptn-nntp-reader04.plus.net...
    > >> > Greetings, I hope someone can help me as I cannot figure this problem
    > > out.
    > >> >
    > >> > My PC intermittently (every day or so, but sometimes after an hour,
    > >> > sometimes after a few days) crashes, usually during video playback. I
    > > use
    > >> > Zoom media player which will automatically play back the next file in
    a
    > >> > directory. Usually the crash occurs following the end of one file's
    > >> > playback
    > >> > when I'd expect it to simply start on the next file.
    > >> >
    > >> > When it crashes I get the same memory error in Windows:
    > >> > ***STOP:0x0000007F (0x00000000,0x00000000,0x00000000,0x00000000)
    > >> > UNEXPECTED_KERNEL_MODE_TRAP Beginning dump of physical memory
    > >> >
    > >> > Because this is a memory error, I downloaded the Microsoft Windows
    > > Memory
    > >> > Diagnostic tool (http://oca.microsoft.com/en/windiag.asp) to find the
    > >> > fault.
    > >> >
    > >> > If I run this tool with the Motherboard Bios set to your default
    > > settings
    > >> > (which sets Advanced>Onboard Devices Configuration>Onboard Promise
    > >> > Controller>Operating Mode>RAID), not all hard disks are identified
    upon
    > >> > boot, but the tool says that all memory passes all tests (the tool
    runs
    > >> > before the OS is loaded, from a bootable floppy disk).
    > >> >
    > >> > However, as soon as I change the Operating Mode of the Onboard
    Promise
    > >> > Controller to IDE (not the default setting), all hard disks become
    > >> > identified upon boot, BUT the memory fails all tests. This is the
    only
    > >> > configuration that enables me to properly boot and use all drives,
    > > though.
    > >> >
    > >> > I don't know whether the faults are connected however the errors I
    > > receive
    > >> > are memory errors and, it would seem that the only way I can set the
    > > Bios
    > >> > to
    > >> > successfully boot with all drives seen, is to set the Promise
    > >> > Controller
    > >> > to
    > >> > IDE (I don't use a RAID array) and doing this leads to memory faults
    > > being
    > >> > identified by the Windows Memory Diagnostic tool.
    > >> >
    > >> > I have tried using different (known good) memory and still get the
    same
    > >> > intermittent crashes with the same memory fault.
    > >> >
    > >> > Motherboard: Asus P4C800-E Deluxe
    > >> > Bios: 1018
    > >> > Revision: 2
    > >> > Video: Asus V9520 Magic NVidia
    > >> > Driver: 44.03
    > >> > CPU: Intel Pentium 4 3.066GHz Prescott (800MHz) 1MB cache
    > >> > Memory: 2 x Geil 512MB DDR PC3200 400MHz running in dual channel mode
    > >> > OS: Windows 2000
    > >> >
    > >> > Please can anyone help me to identify the cause and suggest a
    > > resolution?
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >>
    > >>
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
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